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Bill Thayer

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clickmap of the Via Flaminia; everything is also linked below

There is no Roman pavement to be seen in this stretch of the Flaminia, yet the most Roman feature about it is clear: its modern highway successor is ruler-straight, with only two very slight swerves of no more than twenty meters. Even the casual walker will realize that any Roman pavement must lie under the asphalt: else why would two very old tombs 250m apart line up along the modern road?


[image ALT: Roman stones in a church façade]

1
The Roman town of Mevania has several of its buildings left; at least two of them are on the street that becomes the Flaminia once it leaves the walls.


[image ALT: arched gate with palm tree]

2
The Roman road left town thru a gate still called the Porta Flaminia although it is now only a medieval successor; but within 30 meters some walls and substructures of opus reticulatum can be seen.


[image ALT: a patch of woods]

3
The scant remains, if any, of the amphitheatre of Bevagna lie fifty meters or so off the Flaminia about half a kilometer out of town.
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[image ALT: a long straight river flowing across a plain]

4
Another kilometer away, the Flaminia crosses the Tinia river (now the Topino) where the remains of a small bridge can be seen below the modern highway.
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[image ALT: a stone house]

5
The day I was in Búdino I may have been the first foreign tourist to visit in many years. Full of Roman stuff, though: a semi-abandoned farmhouse a couple hundred yards away is built of beautifully squared ancient travertine, and 200 years ago Pope Pius VI's bishop of Foligno saw fit to restore it; it's in fact the church of S. Angelo del Rosario.


[image ALT: a sarcophagus]

6
Fiamenga is a village strung along a long straight street (you're way ahead of me. . .) that the modern highway and its traffic sidestep ever so slightly. Yes, the street overlies the ancient Via Flaminia; and the name of the town tips the visitor off: in Antiquity, something like *Flaminica, probably. Two churches and quite a bit of Roman stone, including a sarcophagus.


[image ALT: a ruined 2‑storey stone tower]

7
Just outside Fiamenga, the first of two Roman tombs: as usual, only the rubble core, the decorative facing of good stone having been reused.


[image ALT: a stone wall with 5 niches]

8
150 meters further towards Foligno the second Roman tomb: in its stripped state, it looks much like the first. A close look shows the two to be somewhat differently built.


[image ALT: a church at an intersection]

9
The attractive chapel of the Madonna della Fiamenga may reuse one or two big Roman stones, but otherwise is the work of the 13c. It does mark the intersection, however, of the Flaminia and the road from Foligno to Spello: the ancient road from Fulginiae to Hispellum was surely the same, but here I'm talking thru my hat.


[image ALT: the stone base to a water faucet]

10
Forum Flaminii ( [right arrow] For' Flamma [right arrow] Frofiamma [right arrow] now S. Giovanni Profiamma) must have been a largish Roman town, since this is where the two branches of the Flaminia met again to cross the Apennines on its way to the Adriatic. There aren't many choices, and the valley of the Topino is the best: the modern roads and railroad do the same. Traces of Antiquity, and an attractive church.


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Site updated: 27 Mar 99