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Bill Thayer

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The Via Flaminia:
The "Other" Road from Rome to the Adriatic


[image ALT: An old straight road in the countryside with a Roman arch in the background. It is the Northern gate of the ancient Roman town of Carsulae, in Umbria (central Italy).]

A particularly atmospheric walk along the great road where she served as the main street of the Roman town of Carsulae in Umbria: here for the most part behind us as we near the gate westward out of the city.

This is one of the few remaining stretches of Roman pavement on the Flaminia. For others, see the Clivus Argentarius in Rome, Rignano Flaminio, and Ocriculum (for now, a bare photo).

In the summer of 2000 I walked about a third of the Flaminia, at least to the extent one can, since we have very little pavement and often enough we're not even too sure exactly where it was. In addition to gaining me some real familiarity with the road, this also netted me books, conversations, and photos, and I'm now rebuilding this site from scratch: the results will show up here as they occur.

On their way: better and more detailed maps covering the entire Flaminia from Rome to Rimini; rescans of all my previous photos with a negative scanner, which will mean much better screen images; proper pages for each of the identifiable places along the road; probably a small bibliography.

Right this minute, though, you can still form a fair idea of the road from the 39 pages and 75 images below. Consider them raw material, as I do: but from an eyewitness who took pictures, at least; if you need a bit more structure to hang them on, see the brief Encyclopedia Britannica article.


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[5/15/98: 11 pages, 12 photos ]

Rome including:
the Clivus Argentarius • the Tomb of Bibulus • the Ara Pacis • the Porta Flaminia • and the Milvian Bridge


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[5/23/01: 1 page, 2 photos ]

From Prima Porta to near Falerii Novi: my diary account, Sep. 13, covering Prima Porta • Malborghetto • Rignano Flaminio.


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[4/28/98: 1 page, 1 photo ]

Ocriculum and, separately, the modern town of Otricoli 3 km away, built of the ruins of the Roman city: it's really a large outdoor lapidary museum.


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[5/12/01: 2 pages, 2 photos, 1 engraving ]

Narni: the famous bridge is for now just represented by a placeholder page, since the photo was too striking to withhold; and Augustus Hare's view of it. Text and quite a few more pix on their way, of course.


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[4/2/98: 1 page, 2 photos ]

Carsulae: Now in a beautiful country setting, this Roman town almost certainly owes its very existence to the opening of the consular road in the 3c B.C.


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[4/21/11: 6 pages, 20 photos ]

From Carsulae to vicus ad Martis: A stretch of the Flaminia — don't get your hopes up, I saw no actual pavement — with a number of striking Roman sites:

the first bridge over the Naia at Ponte Fonnaia • the second bridge over the Naia at S. Giovanni de Butris • the remains of Villa S. Faustino • the church of S. Maria in Pantano • at Massa Martana, an inscription recording Hadrian's restoration of the road.


[image ALT: a 15‑foot-tall Roman tomb core by the side of a modern road]

[8/15/99: 10 pages, 25 photos ]

From Mevania to Forum Flaminii: A second stretch of the road — this time, the road is there, but no actual pavement — from the Roman monuments of Bevagna to the attractive church of S. Giovanni Profiamma with several interesting Roman vestiges on the way.


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[5/23/01: 5 pages, 11 photos ]

From Schisa to Fanum Fortunae: my diary account, Aug. 8‑13, covering Pontericcioli • Cantiano • Cagli • Domitian's tunnel at the Gola del Furlo • Forum Sempronii.


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[8/22/01: 1 photo ]

Fanum Fortunae: Mostly an attractive Roman gate, which would be in much better shape if a famous humanist Pope hadn't destroyed a good chunk of it.


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[5/8/98: 4 pages, 6 photos ]

Ariminum: The end of the Flaminia. Also the beginning of the Via Æmilia with a splendid Roman bridge.


[image ALT: a blocked-up arch of neat stone masonry]

[ 1 page, 1 photo ]

On the so‑called Via Flaminia Nova or "new" branch — said by many to be newer than the original road, although there is not full agreement on that — for now just a bridge in Spoletium.


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Site updated: 21 Apr 11