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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1832

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

George W. Ward: Four years in the Army, including action in the Second Seminole War; then a merchant in Texas.

Robert Percy Smith: Four years in the Army, during one of which he taught at the Academy; more teaching as a civilian, but died fairly young.

Benjamin S. Ewell: Resigned after four years; professor of mathematics and science in various Virginia colleges, but especially at William and Mary, of which he was President; defending it against Union troops in the War between the States, and fighting for it for many years after the war. [+ AOG]

George W. Cass: Resigned after four years, during which, however, he got a real taste for engineering; he became a railroad engineer and eventually president of the Northern Pacific Railroad.

Jacob W. Bailey: Professor of chemistry, mineralogy and geology at the Academy for twenty years; best known as the leading expert of his time on infusoria and algae, a pioneer in microbotany and microgeology, and inventor of significant improvements to the microscope.

Philip St. George Cocke: Resigned within two years; a successful Virginia planter, an unsuccessful Confederate general.

Henry G. Sill: Sent on the Black Hawk Expedition, but was mostly assigned to topographical duty; died three years after graduating.

Joseph C. Vance: Left the army after three years; killed in a traffic accident a few years later.

George Watson: Six years in the Army, including combat in the Second Seminole War; spent the rest of his life as a Methodist minister.

Erasmus D. Keyes: Over thirty years in the Army: Indian removal, teaching at the Military Academy, posts in the Pacific Northwest including skirmishes with Indians; fought in the War between the States; a pioneer vintner in Napa Valley.

Franklin McDuffee: On graduating, he was sent to the Black Hawk War; two weeks later, he was dead.

Lewis Howell: Resigned after a year; civil engineer, iron manufacturer, insurance executive.

William Wall: Fifteen years in the Army, including service on the western frontier and in the Second Seminole War; fought in the Mexican War, and died in Mexico.

John N. Macomb: His early career was spent mostly surveying, mapping and exploring, and his later career in river improvements.

Edward Deas: Served in various frontier forts for fifteen years, and fought in the Mexican War; drowned in the Rio Grande shortly afterwards.

John E. Brackett: Resigned after a year to become a civilian lawyer, mirroring the country by successive moves from New York to Michigan and Illinois to California, where he served in the Mexican War.

Ward B. Burnett: Four years in the Artillery, and resigned; engineer in charge of large naval dry docks and water works; fought in the Mexican War.

James H. Simpson: A lifelong engineer specializing mostly in railroad work and river and port improvements.

Alfred Brush: Four years in the Army; became a doctor in Detroit.

Richard G. Fain: Resigned six months after graduating, but not before serving in the Black Hawk War; a businessman and local politician in Rogersville, TN, he raised a volunteer regiment for the Second Seminole War and another to fight for the Confederacy in the War between the States.

Henderson K. Yoakum: Resigned nine months after graduating, but not before serving in the Black Hawk War; a lawyer in Tennessee and Texas, and served in the Mexican War with the troops of the Republic of Texas.

Tench Tilghman: Resigned after a year; farmer, educator, railroad executive, and occasional U. S. government official.

William H. Pettes: Resigned after four years; civil engineer in river and harbor improvements in New York State, came back to the Army to fight for the Union in the War between the States.

Theophilus F. J. Wilkinson: Resigned within three years, having spent them in southern garrisons; civilian career unknown, and died young.

Lorenzo Sitgreaves: Surveyor and topographical engineer, best known today for his exploration of the Zuñi River; fought in the Mexican War and served the Union in the War between the States.

George B. Crittenden: Resigned within the year; a lawyer for a while, but back in the Army fairly soon; fought in the Mexican War and served on the western frontier; fought briefly for the Confederacy in the War between the States. His career as a whole was marred by arrests, drunkenness, and court-martials.

Jacob Brown: Four years in the Army, and as a civilian was for nearly two years the Acting Paymaster of the Army in the Second Seminole War; died young.

Daniel P. Whiting: Infantryman in southern and western frontier posts; fought in the Mexican War and continued in the Union Army during the War between the States; best known today for his lithographs of the Mexican War.

Randolph B. Marcy: Inspector-General of the Army; author of Thirty Years of Army Life on the Border and other books drawing on his frontier experiences.

James P. Hardin: Resigned after five months, having gone on the Black Hawk Expedition. Kentucky lawyer and state politician, died young.

Thomas M. Hill: Served mostly in Wisconsin; died young, apparently while home on leave.

Roger S.Dix: Nearly twenty years in the Army: various low-key duties, then fought in the Mexican War.

Robert H. Archer: Resigned after five years; was the principal of two successive boarding schools for girls.

James V. Bomford: Infantryman, posted to many garrisons, then fought in the Mexican War, after which for thirteen years he was assigned to multiple garrisons again, but only in Texas; fought for the Union in the War between the States. [+ AOG]

Richard C. Gatlin: Infantryman, served on the western frontier and in the Second Seminole War and later Indian hostilities in Florida; fought in the Mexican War; and in the War between the States, defended his State against the North. [+ AOG]

William H. Storer: Seven years in the Army, mostly in garrisons in the Old Northwest, but also fought in the Second Seminole War; after that, a long life as a Maine farmer.

George H. Griffin: Infantryman, served on the western and southern frontier, and fought in the Second Sminole War; died in Florida.

John Beach: Resigned after six years in the Old Northwest; Indian agent for the Sac and Fox. [+ AOG]

William O. Kello: Fought in various Indian wars; died young.

Henry Swartwout: Infantryman, posted to West Point as instructor and quartermaster, and to frontier garrisons north, west, and south; then in the Artillery, fought in the Mexican War and served in the Second Seminole War and later Indian hostilities in Florida, where he died. [+ AOG]

Gaines P. Kingsbury: Mounted Ranger and Dragoon on the western frontier, resigned after four years; died three years later while serving as an Indian agent.

Humphrey Marshall: Resigned within a year; Kentucky lawyer and militiaman, U. S. Representative, Commissioner to China; Confederate general and Congressman.

James M. Bowman: Mounted Ranger, on the western frontier seven years, and died.

Asbury Ury: Mounted Ranger, on the western frontier four years; died on sick leave, in Cuba, six years after graduating.

Albert G. Edwards: Resigned within three years; merchant and financial executive, Assistant Treasurer of the United States. [+ AOG]


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Site updated: 15 Feb 13