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USMA
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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1836

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

George L. Welcker: Twelve years in the Army as an engineer building the Cumberland Road and several forts.

James L. Mason: Engineer of coastal fortifications; fought in Mexican War.

Danville Leadbetter: Engineer who worked most of his career in Mobile Bay; served in much the same capacity as a Confederate general in the War between the States.

Joseph R. Anderson: Resigned after fifteen months; in civilian life, an engineer and the owner and chief executive of the Tredegar Iron Foundry in Richmond; in the War between the States, fought for his State against the North.

Montgomery C. Meigs: U. S. Quartermaster-General for twenty years, including during the entire War between the States; involved in the establishment of Arlington National Cemetery, the building of the Capitol dome and the Smithsonian Institute, and many other important logistical enterprises.

Daniel P. Woodbury: Construction engineer, built forts and lighthouses and the author of two technical works on the subject; during the War between the States, fought for the Union.

Fisher A. Lewis: Fought in the Second Seminole War, but resigned after a year and a half; a long life as a (West) Virginia farmer.

Samuel J. Bransford: Taught mathematics at the Military Academy, where he was killed in a riding accident — only four years after graduating.

Augustus P. Allen: Artilleryman and Topographical Engineer; fought in the Second Seminole War; died in Louisiana five years after graduating.

William H. Warner: Ten years on topographical service; killed by Indians in the line of duty, surveying mountain passes for the transcontinental railroad.

Barnabas Conkling: Served on the frontier; assigned to Indian removal; died within three years of graduating.

William B. Wallace: Resigned immediately; worked as a railroad engineer and taught school, but died five years after graduating.

Marlborough Churchill: Resigned almost immediately; a school principal for most of his life.

David P. De Witt: Resigned almost immediately, and worked as a civil engineer; but in the War between the States, fought for the Union with several different volunteer and reserve units despite health problems; after the war, returned to civilian life as a supply manager for a transportation company.

James Lowry Donaldson: Artilleryman, posted to various hot spots during the first few years of his career, and fought in the Mexican War; his greatest achievements were in Union service during the War between the States, as Quartermaster in the Tennessee Campaign.

John P. J. O'Brien: Fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican War; author of a treatise on military law and the practice of courts-martial.

Roland A. Luther: Served in the Second Seminole War and on the western frontier; fought in the Mexican War and in the Third Seminole War; died fairly young after a seventeen-year career in the Army.

Thomas W. Sherman: Artilleryman, served in the Second Seminole War and fought in the Mexican War; served on the western frontier, and fought for the Union in the War between the States, losing his right leg.

John F. Roland: Fought in the Second Seminole War, the Mexican War, and the Third Seminole War.

Charles B. Sing: Fought in the Second Seminole War, but resigned after a year; a Methodist minister.

Alexander P. Crittenden: Resigned immediately; railroad engineer, lawyer and politician.

Henry H. Lockwood: Fought in the Second Seminole War, but resigned after a year; mathematics, science, and military science professor and one of the founders of the Naval Academy; fought for the Union in the War between the States.

Christopher A. Greene: Resigned within a year; a civilian educator.

John W. Phelps: Artilleryman, fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican War, and for the Union in the War between the States in which he organized the first Negro troops — out of conviction rather than Lincoln's later expediency — and resigned over the matter; a man of many convictions, he was a candidate for the presidency of the United States and an author.

Peter V. Hagner: Ordnance man, fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican War; during his forty-year Army career he commanded several arsenals and served as a technical expert on a number of ordnance boards.

Muscoe L. Shackleford: Fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican War; died from wounds suffered at the Battle of Molino del Rey, eleven years after graduating.

Christopher Q. Tompkins: Fought in the Second Seminole War; resigned after serving garrison duty during the Mexican War; in civilian life, iron manufacturer.

Martin J. Burke: Fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican War; killed at the Battle of Churubusco, eleven years after graduating.

John W. Judson: Declined his appointment; as a civilian construction engineer of harbor improvements, mostly in upstate New York.

I. Carle Woodruff: Forty-plus years in the Union Army as an engineer: surveying, harbor improvements, lighthouse construction.

William B. Arvin: Resigned almost immediately; Ohio court official.

John S. Hatheway: Artilleryman, fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican War; served in Oregon.

Robert Allen: Fought in the Mexican War; his greatest services to the country were as a quartermaster in charge of the logistics for many of the large Union army corps during the War between the States.

William Frazer: Fought in the Second Seminole War; two more tours of duty in Florida, and died eight years after graduating.

George C. Thomas: Fought in the Second Seminole War and served on an expedition against the Potawatomi Indians; resigning after five years, he was a lawyer and government employee.

Arthur B. Lansing: Resigned immediately, but after three years as a civilian engineer, rejoined the Army; fought in the Mexican War, then was posted to various western garrisons before resigning again after a twelve-year military career; no trace of his civilian life.

Charles B. Daniels: Artilleryman, fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican War; died of battle wounds at Molino del Rey, eleven years after graduating.

William Mock: Fought in the Second Seminole War, almost his whole five-year Army career being spent in Florida; after resigning, farmed a bit in Missouri, was a miner in the California gold rush, then settled down to forty years as a California farmer. [+ AOG]

Robert F. Baker: Infantryman, fought in the Second Seminole War, and was posted to southern and western frontier garrisons; seven years after graduating, he was dismissed for drunkenness, and he died the following year.

Charles Hoskins: Served on Indian and western garrison duty, and fought in the Mexican War; killed at the Battle of Monterey, ten years after graduating.

Samuel Whitehorn: Infantryman; posted to garrisons in the Old Northwest, where he died four years after graduating.

Collinson R. Gates: Infantryman, fought in the Second Seminole War in each of two tours of duty, and in the Mexican War; succumbed to cholera on the western frontier, while still young.

Marcus C. M. Hammond: Resigned after six years in Florida and on the western frontier; though a Southern planter, he stayed out of the War between the States.

Richard G. Stockton: Resigned within the year; a Missouri physician.

Thomas P. Chiffelle: Resigned right away; a civil engineer who held a variety of positions in his career.

Lloyd Tilghman: Railroad engineer and Confederate general killed in the Vicksburg campaign. Photograph.

Thomas McCrate: Served in the Dragoons in Kansas and Iowa; died young.

Henry C. Moorhead: Resigned right away; a Pennsylvania lawyer.

Charles H. E. Spoor: Died a year and a half after graduating.


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Page updated: 15 Feb 13