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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1867

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

Ernest H. Ruffner: Forty years as an engineer, in military roads, waterway and harbor improvement, and lighthouses.

John C. Mallery: Engineer, taught five years at the Military Academy; engaged in topographical and lighthouse work.

Clinton B. Sears: Forty years as an Army engineer, much of it in waterway improvement.

Thomas Turtle: Twenty-five years as an engineer, almost always on waterway improvement projects.

Joseph E. Griffith: Fought for the Union in the War between the States before becoming a Cadet; on graduating, was an engineer in river improvements, but resigned after four years; died fairly young.

William E. Rogers: Resigned two years after graduating; New York railroad commissioner and lawyer.

Lewis M. Haupt: Resigned two years after graduating; professor of civil engineering; and practicing engineer, primarily of canals.

John E. Greer: Forty years as an ordnance officer; commanded several arsenals.

Edward Maguire: Twenty-five years as an Army engineer, author of a work on coast fortifications. [+ AOG]

John Pitman: Ordnance officer, commanding various arsenals by the end of his career. Before becoming a Cadet, served as a volunteer in the Union Army in the War between the States.

Frederick A. Mahan: Engineer, mostly in waterway improvement, especially of the Ohio River; military attaché in Denmark and France.

Charles F. Powell: Forty years as an Army engineer, mostly in waterway improvement; before becoming a Cadet, fought for the Union in the War between the States as an enlisted man for two years.

Frederick A. Hinman: Engineer, mostly of harbor and river improvements; after retiring to civilian life, director of a cement company.

William F. Reynolds: Artilleryman, taught three years at the Military Academy; died ten years after graduating.

Charles Shaler: Ordnance officer; taught five years at the Military Academy, and served as a Senate committee staffer for three years; commanded various arsenals.

Charles S. Heintzelman: Artilleryman, but soon specialized in the construction of post buildings; died fairly young.

John M. K. Davis: Forty years in the Artillery, often as an instructor or an inspector; at the end of his career, commanding various districts and departments.

Crosby P. Miller: Artilleryman, but soon specialized in the construction of post buildings, for mcmost his thirty-nine years in the Army.

Charles G. Eckhart: Resigned three years after graduating; practiced law in Illinois, and twice a delegate to the Republican National Convention.

Luigi Lomia: Artilleryman, entered the Military Academy with a Master's Degree; posted to or commanded mostly coastal forts, and fought in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War.

James E. Bell: Artilleryman, died six years after graduating; served almost his whole brief career in New York State.

Robert M. Rogers: Artilleryman; almost all his thirty-three years in the Army were spent in East Coast garrisons. A year in the service of the Khedive of Egypt, and a brief tour of duty in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War.

Thomas H. Barber: An artilleryman for eighteen years, during which he was posted to various East Coast garrisons; as a civilian, devoted himself to charitable causes. Represented the Army at the Hawaiian annexation ceremonies.

John M. Johnson: Resigned after three years in the Cavalry scouting in Indian country; was a government official in Missouri and a lawyer in Colorado.

John McClellan: Thirty-nine years in the Artillery, almost entirely at coastal forts; served as ordnance officer in the Spanish-American War, with service in Cuba just after the war.

Thomas T. Thornburgh: Before his appointment as a Cadet, he had fought for the Union in the War between the States as a volunteer enlisted man; after graduating, posted mostly in the West, and killed by Indians when still young.

Eugene P. Murphy: Resigned within five years of graduating; went into brokerage, real estate, and insurance. [+ AOG]

Samuel R. Jones: Over forty years in the Army, the first twenty-five in the Artillery, sometimes fighting Indians in the Pacific Northwest; the remainder in the Quartermaster's Department. Fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War and during the insurgency.

Ephraim T. C. Richmond: Nearly forty years in the Artillery, almost all of them in Eastern coastal forts; but served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Henry B. Osgood: Artilleryman, found his niche as a commissary officer for they twenty years. Before becoming a Cadet, he fought for the Union in the War between the States. [+ AOG]

James Bassel: Resigned three years after graduating; in civilian life, worked mostly in railroads.

Sedgwick Pratt: Nearly forty years in the Artillery. Taught nine years at the Military Academy; by the end of his career, he was most often acting as an inspector.

Allyn Capron: Artilleryman, served at many posts in all parts of the country; fought in the Sioux Campaign of 1890 and in the Spanish-American War in Cuba.

Henry D. Wallen, Jr.: Left the army three years after graduating, went into railroads and the iron business.

Arthur Cranston: Artilleryman, killed in the Modoc Campaign six years after graduating.

Alexander D. Schenck: Nearly forty years in the Artillery, both coastal and field; served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War.

Oliver E. Wood: Almost forty years in the Artillery, almost all of them at coastal forts, except for two years in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and afterward, and four years as military attaché in Japan.

Edward M. Merriman: Left the army three years after graduating; a railroad engineer and state public official.

Edwin S. Curtis: Before becoming a Cadet, served as a private in the Union forces in the War between the States. Graduated as an artilleryman; taught military science; served in Cuba.

George A. Garretson: Resigned after two years; in civilian life, a banker. Participated in the Puerto Rican actions of the Spanish-American War.

Jacob Almy: Cavalryman, fought Indians in the West, and was killed by an Indian six years after graduating.

William J. Sartle: Infantryman; stationed at various forts in the South and West, died six years after graduating.

Leander T. Howes: Resigned within two years of graduating; banker and gentleman farmer.

Henry C. Danes: Thirty-four years in the Artillery, stationed mostly at coastal forts; served in China in the Boxer Rebellion and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Walter Howe: Artilleryman, posted to an unusually large number of garrisons thruout the United States; fought Indians on the western frontier and insurgents in the Philippines; by the end of his 43‑year career was a departmental commander.

Barnet Wager: Sixteen years in the Artillery, much of it at coastal forts.

Medorem Crawford: Forty years in the Artillery, mostly coastal; served on expedition into Mexico in 1878 and in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War.

Edward Davis: Thirty-eight years in the Artillery; served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

A. Tracy Lee: Died within three years of graduating.

Henry N. Moss: Cavalryman, served nine years on frontier duty in the Pacific Northwest, and resigned; search engine and superintendent of streets in Washington, DC.

Stanislaus Remak: Resigned four years after graduating, got a law degree, and practiced law.

Horatio M. Jones: Resigned six years after graduating; in civilian life, he was a lumber dealer.

Edward S. Godfrey: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier (Medal of Honor), served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William J. Roe: Resigned two years after graduating, without ever having performed any duties; a prolific writer and illustrator.

Christopher C. Wolcott: Fourteen years in the Artillery, then twenty-one years — the rest of his life — in the Navy as an engineer.

John A. Campbell: Twelve years in the Artillery, including a tour of duty in Alaska.

Gilbert P. Cotton: Thirty years in the Artillery, almost all of it in coastal forts mostly in the East.

Eliphalet N. Chester: Resigned three years after graduating; in civilian life, a patchwork of odd jobs.

George W. Cradlebaugh: Left the army within four years of graduating; a government surveyor, he died four years after that. Before becoming a Cadet, served in the Union Army in the War between the States.

William B. McCallum: Artilleryman; served almost all of his twenty-two years' Army career in Eastern coastal forts.

Orsemus B. Boyd: Cavalryman; died after an eighteen-year career spent entirely in western garrisons. [+ AOG]

Thomas R. Adams: Thirty-seven years in the Artillery, with brief tours of duty in Puerto Rico just after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

John H. Gifford: Thirty years in the Artillery, stationed at coastal and inland forts about equally. [+ AOG]


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Page updated: 27 Jan 14