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Bill Thayer

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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1814

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

George W. Gardiner: served in the War of 1812; killed in Dade's Massacre, that triggered the Second Seminole War.

Charles S. Merchant: Fifty years in the Artillery, serving in the War of 1812, the Second Seminole War, the Mexican War, and the War between the States.

Nathaniel G. Dana: Nearly nineteen years in the Artillery, apparently without seeing action.

John Munroe: Born in Scotland, spent nearly fifty years in the Artillery, serving in the War of 1812, the Second Seminole War and Jackson's Indian resettlements, and brevetted for gallantry in the Mexican War.

John S. Allanson: Six years in the army, and ten years after returning to civilian life, died at sea on his way to Russia.

Lewis G. De Russy: New York-born, he served in the War of 1812 and more than fifteen years in the Red River region. Dropped from the army for irregularity in disbursements, became a Louisiana planter and engineer, and eventually a Confederate general.

Thomas Childs: served in the War of 1812, the Second Seminole War, the Mexican War, and further operations in Florida.

Stephen Birdsall: one year in the Army, during which he served in the War of 1812; then an undistinguished civilian career as a bureaucrat.

John Wright: four years in the Army, followed by a civilian career as a lawyer with political interests.

Edmund Brooke: Commissioned in the Marines; three years in the service, then disappeared into civilian life.

John Armstrong: Resigned after a year; his civilian career was as a lawyer and state politician.

James W. Ripley: Rose to become Chief of Ordnance of the Army; left behind him the memory of a stringently honest man who worked hard to prevent contractors from cheating the government.

Daniel Turner: Left the Army after a year; his civilian career included politics, engineering, and running a girls' school.

Isaac E. Craig: An engineer during the War of 1812, he died five years after graduating.

Charles M. Thruston: More than 20 years in the Army, and a civilian life of local prominence in Cumberland, MD.

Henry W. Fitzhugh: A 20‑year Army career as quartermaster of artillery followed by 40 years in civilian business pursuits.

Jackman J. Davis: A miscellaneous career in the North; transferred to Florida, he died there.

Thomas T. Stephenson: Garrison and ordnance duty in various posts during and after the War of 1812; died five years after graduating.

Evans Humphrey: Garrison and artillery duty in various posts during and after the War of 1812; disbanded after seven years, and disappeared into civilian life.

Samuel W. Wetmore: Two years in the Army, then two years in the South American wars for independence, where he died.

William Wells: Twenty years in the Artillery, and a varied civilian career in New Orleans.

William L. Booth: Eight years of artillery duty, then settled down to the life of a Kentucky farmer.

Thomas J. Baird: Irish-born, after 14 years in the Artillery, the rest of his life in rural Pennsylvania.

Jabez Parkhurst: He served in the War of 1812 and fought in the First Seminole War; and died 7 years after graduating.

Robert L. Armstrong: A career very blandly written up, but 20 years in the Army.

James F. Badollet: Four years in the Army and a long life as an Indiana farmer and local politician.

George W. Gardner: Five years in the Army, then disappeared into civilian life.

Bradley S. A. Lowe: Five years in the Army, then he too disappeared into civilian life.

Thomas R. Broom: Was disbanded after nearly seven years, and died eight years after that.

Hilary Brunot: Disbanded after seven years, he went on to a career in manufacturing; sat on the city council of Pittsburgh.


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Page updated: 15 Feb 13