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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1823

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

Alfred Mordecai: An ordnance expert who wrote the Army's first Ordnance Manual and made improvements to gunpowder, he sidelined himself during the War between the States.

George S. Greene: Served thirteen years as an engineer after graduating, then continued with a civilian career as an engineer; served in the War between the States as a Union general mostly in Virginia and North Carolina, then returned to his civilian engineering career.

George C. Richards: Died (in France) two years after graduating.

Reuben Holmes: Ten years in the Army, all on the western frontier; fought in the Black Hawk War.

Samuel M. Southerland: Quit the Army after a year; an Alabama physician and planter, but died young.

Lucien B. Webster: Thirty years in the Army, on frontiers north, south, and west; served in the Second Seminole War, fought in the Mexican War, and died in Louisiana.

Frederick L. Guion: Died a few months after graduating.

George Nauman: Forty years in the Army; fought in the Second Seminole War, the Mexican War, and in the service of the Union in the War between the States.

Alfred Beckley: Thirteen years in the Artillery, in garrisons and on ordnance duty; fifty years of a civilian career in local and state courts and politics. [+ AOG]

Frederic Searle: Artilleryman; after ten years in frontier posts, fought in the Second Seminole War, in which he was wounded and permanently disabled.

Richard de Treville: Resigned after a year; his political career took him to Lieutenant-Governor of South Carolina.

Andrew Kinnard: Seven years in the Army on miscellaneous duties, mostly ordnance but six weeks teaching chemistry at the Academy; died very soon after resigning.

George W. Waters: Thirteen years in the Army, on the western frontier; settled down to the life of a civilian farmer in Missouri.

John Farley: Twelve years in the Army, much of it on topographical duty; as a civilian, a long career with the Geodetic Survey of the Atlantic Coast.

Levi M. Nute: Fifteen years on frontier duty; died five years after resigning, on the Santa Fé Expedition.

Mark W. Batman: Infantryman; died after fifteen years on the western frontier, Indian removal, etc.

Lorenzo Thomas: An adjutant for most of his career, he fought in the Second Seminole War, and became Adjutant-General of the Union Army during the War between the States; in charge of recruiting colored troops.

Julius J. B. Kingsbury: Infantryman; served in the Second Seminole War, fought and was breveted in the Mexican War, then was posted to California at the beginning of the Gold Rush, where he went AWOL for several years and was finally dismissed.

George Andrews: Infantryman for nearly forty years, almost all of it on the western frontier; fought in the Seminole Wars.

Richard D. C. Collins: Infantryman; after seventeen years of service in Florida and on the western frontier, dismissed for failure to render proper accounts.

William Reynolds: Died seven years after graduating — one month after leaving the Army.

Joseph R. Smith: Forty-five years in the Army: garrison, recruiting, topographical duty; at the beginning of the War between the States, he was retired by the Army for his wounds from the Mexican War, but he came back to serve the Union thru his home State of Michigan, until he died.

Hannibal Day: Infantry for forty years, mostly on frontier duty; fought for the Union in the War between the States.

Henry R. Stewart: Resigned after five years; no further trace of him.

Elias Phillips: Thirteen years in the Army, in the Southeast — garrisons, Indians, and construction of military roads; in civilian life, a manufacturer.

Joseph A. Phillips: Seventeen years in the Army, mostly on frontier duty; taught infantry tactics briefly at the Academy.

Asa Richardson: Twelve years on the western frontier, and died there.

John E. Newell: Died after nearly twelve years in the Army, almost all of it on the western frontier.

John Nicholls: Nearly twelve years in the Army, all of it on the western frontier but was dismissed for "un-officerlike conduct"; in civilian life, a merchant.

George H. Crosman: Forty-some years in the Army, on frontier posts and most of it on quartermaster duty, including for the Union in the War between the States.

Charles Holt: Died in Louisiana a year after graduating.

John W. Cotton: Twenty years in the Army, mostly on the western frontier; then settled down to farm in Wisconsin.

Edmund B. Alexander: Forty-five years in the Army, much of it on the western frontier; fought in the Mexican War and served the Union as a senior recruiting officer during the War between the States.

Albert S. Miller: Nearly thirty years in the Infantry, much of it on the western frontier; fought in the Black Hawk War, the Second Seminole War, and the Mexican War.

Egbert B. Birdsall: Twenty years in the Infantry, on the frontier, north, west, and south.


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Page updated: 1 Jun 14