[image ALT: Much of my site will be useless to you if you've got the images turned off!]
mail:
Bill Thayer

[image ALT: Cliccare qui per una pagina di aiuto in Italiano.]
Italiano

[Link to a series of help pages]
Help
[Link to the next level up]
Up
[Link to my homepage]
Home
This site is not affiliated with the US Military Academy.
[decorative delimiter]
USMA
Home

Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1828

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

Albert E. Church: His entire half-century career was spent as a professor of mathematics at the Academy. [+ AOG]

Richard C. Tilghman: A Marylander, after eight years as a military engineer, resigned to pursue farming mostly; he managed to sidestep the War between the States, despite being an officer in the militia of his State during that time.

Hugh W. Mercer: A quiet seven years in the Artillery mostly in his home State of Georgia, where he returned as planter and banker; defended his State against the Union in the War between the States.

Robert E. Temple: Artilleryman served eleven years in various garrisons, and fought in the Second Seminole War; an attorney in Albany, NY except for a year or so back in the Army during the Mexican War, on the Texas border.

Charles O. Collins: Artilleryman, served at various flashpoints but apparently without seeing combat in his eighteen years in the Army; died on the western frontier.

Ivers J. Austin: Resigned immediately; became a successful Boston lawyer.

Edmund French: Eight years in the Artillery in various East Coast garrisons, about half of it on topographical duty; as a civilian, worked as an engineer mostly in New York State, on railroads and the Croton Aqueduct.

Joseph L. Locke: Eight years in the Artillery in various Southern garrisons, including service in the Second Seminole War; in civilian life, an engineer and a newspaper editor, returning home from a long residence in Europe to serve his home State of Georgia in the War between the States.

George E. Chase: Five years in the Army, surveying and engineering; also worked for the federal government as a civilian engineer.

John F. Lane: A very miscellaneous eight-year Army career ending with his promotion, skipping a rank, and transfer to the Dragoons, action in the Second Seminole War, and his death in Florida all within five months.

William Palmer: Seven years in the Artillery in various garrisons, and died young.

Thomas B. Adams: Nine years in the Artillery, with combat in the Second Seminole War; died in garrison in Florida.

Robert E. Clary: Nearly forty years in the Infantry, mostly on the Western frontier, building barracks when he was young, on quartermaster duty later; served in the Second Seminole War and on the Union side in the War between the States.

Robert Sevier: Nine years in the Army, mostly on the western frontier, with service in the Black Hawk War and the Second Seminole War; the long peaceful life of a Missouri farmer afterwards.

William W. Mather: Developed a taste for geology while a cadet; for most of his eight years in the Army, he taught the subject at the Academy, and continued his career as a civilian, rising to national prominence in that field.

Enos J. Mitchell: Infantryman, posted to various garrisons in the Old Northwest, and fought in the Black Hawk War; died in Florida during the Second Seminole War.

James F. Izard: Served on the frontier and in the Black Hawk War; killed in the Second Seminole War at the Battle of the Withlacoochee River.

Thomas Cutts: Infantryman, ten years on the western frontier, where he died.

William H. Baker: Resigned within three years of graduating, and died four years later.

James L. Thompson: Eighteen years in the Infantry, mostly on the Northwest frontier; retired to farm in Michigan, but died there not long after.

Gustave S. Rousseau: Nearly five years on the western frontier, then a long civilian life as a Louisiana planter and law officer, interrupted by a few weeks in the Volunteers during the Mexican War.

Benjamin W. Kinsman: Posted to western garrisons; died within four years of graduating.

Jefferson Davis: Resigned after seven years on the western frontier, to lead a political career; U. S. Representative, Senator, Secretary of War; President of the Confederacy, which is not mentioned in the Register.

William L. E. Morrison: Left the Army after two years, and died four years later.

Samuel K. Cobb: Five and a half years on western frontier duty; died in Louisiana.

Samuel Torrence: Four years on the western frontier, including service in the Black Hawk War; died in Illinois.

Amos Foster: Three years on the frontier in the Northwest; killed by a soldier.

Thomas F. Drayton: Eight years in the Army, half of it on topographical duty; in civilian life, a South Carolina planter and railroad engineer; defended his State against the Union in the War between the States. [+ AOG]

Thomas C. Brockway: Died on the western frontier three years after graduating.

John R. B. Gardenier: His twenty-two years in the Army were spent on the western frontier, at the lead and zinc mines of Dubuque and Galena, in the Black Hawk War, the First Seminole War and the Mexican War; not surprisingly they included five or six years of sick leave, at the end of which he died, still fairly young.

Crafts J. Wright: Resigned immediately, and was an Ohio lawyer and newspaper editor; in the War between the States, fought for the Union as a Volunteer, but poor health forced his resignation.

James W. Penrose: Infantryman; fought in the Black Hawk War, the Second Seminole War, and the Mexican War.

Philip R. Van Wyck: He graduated, but was deaf, and therefore not commissioned in the Army; a civil engineer, died within four years.


[image ALT: Valid HTML 4.01.]

Site updated: 15 Feb 13