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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1831

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

Roswell Park: Author of the first history of West Point. (A complete transcription of it is onsite.)

Henry Clay: Son of the senator, he was killed at Buena Vista. Photo of his grave.

James Allen: Resigned after three years; pursued a career as a lawyer.

Henry E. Prentiss: Resigned after four years; pursued a career as a lawyer and a lumber executive.

Albert Miller Lea: Resigned within five years, of mostly topographical duty; railroad engineer, surveyor, mathematics and science professor, glass manufacturer, and briefly Acting U. S. Secretary of War; in the War between the States, fought for the Confederacy. [+ AOG]

Richard H. Peyton: Died eight years after graduating, having taught two years at the Academy, fought in the Second Seminole War, and participated in the westward removal of the Cherokee Indians.

William A. Norton: His entire two years in the Army were spent teaching science at the Military Academy; as a civilian, a long professorial career.

George W. Turner: Five years in the Army, and fought in the Second Seminole War; many years later, as a Virginia farmer, he was caught up in the raid on Harper's Ferry and killed there.

Samuel C. Ridgely: Taught mathematics and engineering at the Military Academy for seven years; fought in the Mexican War and in the Second Seminole War; served in many garrisons, mostly in the Northeast.

Samuel H. Miller: Taught mathematics at the Academy for a year, resigned the following year, and died five weeks later.

George H. Talcott: Artillery and Ordnance; fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican War.

Jacob Ammen: Seven years in the Army, mostly teaching mathematics and science at the Military Academy; over twenty years of a similar career in civilian colleges, but back to the Army to defend the Union in the War between the States.

Andrew A. Humphreys: Engineer, especially of river and harbor improvements; fought in the Second Seminole War, and for the Union in the War between the States, commanding the Second Corps; Chief Engineer of the Army.

William H. Emory: Resigned after five years in the Artillery; re-appointed as a Topographical Engineer, and ran several border surveys; fought in the Mexican War and for the Union in the War between the States.

William Chapman: Infantryman, served on the western frontier, fought in the Mexican War and the Third Seminole War, and for the Union in the War between the States.

Charles H. Larnard: Infantryman, fought in the Second Seminole War, in the Mexican War, and against Indians in the Pacific Northwest, where he died in a mission-related boating accident.

Elbridge G. Eastman: Died on the western frontier three years after graduating.

Moses Scott: Four years of staff duties in the Army, then a civilian career as an engineer and mining company executive.

Thomas J. McKean: Resigned within three years; but came back to the Army for three short periods — in the Second Seminole War, to fight in the Mexican War, and in the service of the Union in the War between the States — while pursuing a civilian career as an engineer, surveyor, and politician.

Henry Van Rensselaer: Resigned immediately; a member of a rich and influential family, he became a U. S. Representative, and was Inspector-General of several large Union Army units during the War between the States.

Edmund A. Ogden: Infantryman, fought in the Black Hawk War, and served in the Mexican War and on the frontier north, south, and west, where he died.

Lucius B. Northrop: Infantryman, served on the western frontier for eight years but was disabled; practiced as a physician in his home State of South Carolina; served the Confederacy as its Commissary-General for the duration of the war. [+ AOG]

Erasmus F. Covington: Resigned after two years; farmer in Kentucky but died young.

Horatio P. Van Cleve: Resigned after five years of frontier duty in Wisconsin; farmer in Michigan then Minnesota, with an interruption to fight for the Union in the War between the States.

Bradford R. Alden: Taught seven years at the Academy, and came back later as Commandant of Cadets; frontier duty in the Pacific Northwest, where he was severely wounded fighting Indians, and was forced to retire; in his retirement, one of America's early oil drillers.

Thomas Stockton: Five years on the frontier in the Old Northwest, and as an engineer; a civilian engineer and mail contractor.

Samuel R. Curtis: One year after graduation, resigns for a varied and successful civilian life as an engineer, lawyer, and Congressman; but comes back to the Army to serve in the Mexican War and, signally, for the Union on the western front in the War between the States, in which he wins the important battle of Pea Ridge.

James S. Williams: Six years in the Army, on the western frontier, and fought in the Black Hawk War; a surveyor and railroad engineer.

Ingham Wood: Five years on the frontier in the Old Northwest; left the Army and died young the next year.

Frederick Wilkinson: Four years in garrisons mostly in Louisiana; started a promising civilian career as an engineer and surveyor, but died young.

John G. Harvey: Resigned after a year; newspaper editor.

Charles Whittlesey: Resigned after a year's frontier duty in the Old Northwest; became a prominent geologist and investigator of historical and archaeological subjects, particularly in his home State of Ohio; fought for the Union in the War between the States.

John Conrad: Infantryman, fought in the Black Hawk War and served in the Second Seminole War; died in Florida seven years after graduating.


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Site updated: 15 Feb 13