[image ALT: Much of my site will be useless to you if you've got the images turned off!]
mail:
Bill Thayer

[image ALT: Cliccare qui per una pagina di aiuto in Italiano.]
Italiano

[Link to a series of help pages]
Help
[Link to the next level up]
Up
[Link to my homepage]
Home
This site is not affiliated with the US Military Academy.
[decorative delimiter]
USMA
Home

Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1835

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

George W. Morell: Resigned after two years; New York lawyer, returned to the Army to fight for the Union in the War between the States.

Charles H. Bigelow: Ten years as an Army engineer, building New England forts; as a civilian engineer, worked on dams and canals and a few government forts.

John H. Martindale: Resigned immediately; New York lawyer, returned to the Army to fight for the Union in the War between the States.

Charles J. Whiting: Resigned within a year, and worked as an engineer and surveyor; his second Army career lasted fifteen years, during which he fought Indians and Confederates.

George M. Legate: Resigned within the year; a civilian merchant at Galena on the Illinois frontier, he died five years after graduating.

Alfred Herbert: Fought in the Second Seminole War, but resigned two years after graduating; railroad engineer, educator, and patent examiner and agent.

Arnoldus V. Brumby: Fought in the Second Seminole War, but resigned a year after graduating; Superintendent of the Alabama Military Institute then of the Georgia Military Institute until the outbreak of the War between the States, in which he served neither side.

Joseph Roberts: Artilleryman, served in frontier posts north, south and west, including in Florida during the Third Seminole War; but mostly a military educator, teaching science at the Military Academy for twelve years, and artillery at the Army school at Ft. Monroe.

Horace Brooks: Artilleryman, fought in the Second Seminole War, taught mathematics at the Military Academy, fought in the Mexican War and against Indians in the West where he served for ten years; served the Union in the War between the States.

James M. Morgan: Fought in the Second Seminole War; Ordnance officer or commander of various arsenals.

Robert M. Renick: Resigned within a year; pursued various careers as a civilian, military in banking and real estate.

Richard Henderson: Fresh out of the Point, was killed in Dade's Massacre, that triggered the Second Seminole War.

James N. Ellis: Resigned immediately, worked as a railroad engineer, and died at 23.

John L. Keais: Fresh out of the Point, was killed in Dade's Massacre, that triggered the Second Seminole War.

William Spencer Brown: Resigned immediately; railroad engineer.

Henry L. Kendrick: Taught chemistry, mineralogy and geology 35 years at the Military Academy in two tours of duty separated by service on the western frontier that included fighting the Navajo and the Mojave.

James H. Stokes: Eight years in the Army, during which he fought in the Second Seminole War; a civilian interlude of seventeen years as a glass manufacturer and a railroad executive; then returned to the Army to fight for the Union in the War between the States. [+ AOG]

Montgomery Blair: Resigned within the year; lawyer and politician; Postmaster-General of the United States.

George G. Meade: Served in the Second Seminole War, but resigned after a year; came back to the army a few years later, as a Topographical Engineer, and fought in the Mexican War; and fought for the Union in the War between the States, when his natural ability made him the victor at Gettysburg and propelled him from major to major-general in two years.

William H. Betts: Fought in the Second Seminole War; resigned just short of four years in the Army, and died the following year.

George G. Waggaman: Artilleryman, but quickly found his niche in the Commissariat; fought in the Mexican War, but when the War between the States broke out, left the Army to continue the same line of work as a civilian wholesale grocer.

Weightman K. Hanson: Infantryman, fought in the Second Seminole War and taught at the Military Academy; died nine years after graduating.

Henry M. Naglee: Resigned almost immediately; civil engineer and banker, he joined the Army again for the Mexican War, in which he saw combat against both Mexicans and Indians; and again for the War between the States, in which he fought for the Union.

Archibald Campbell: Resigned after a year, but after a few years as a railroad engineer, made a career as a high-ranking official in the War Department.

Alexander S. Macomb: For most of his five years in the Army, he was aide-de‑camp to his father the famous general, and then retired to a life of leisure. [+ AOG]

John H. Hanley: Cavalryman, killed in a riding accident a few months after graduating.

William H. Griffin: Resigned within two years; a railroad engineer, in the War between the States he fought for the Confederacy.

Abraham R. Johnston: Dragoon, posted for most of his career to Midwest garrisons; killed while leading a charge in the Mexican War.

Peter C. Gaillard: Resigned within three years; cotton factor, and after fighting for the Confederacy in the War between the States, mayor of Charleston, SC.

Henry Prince: Infantryman, fought in the Second Seminole War and served on the western frontier; fought in the Mexican War and for the Union in the War between the States; closed his career with several years as a high-level paymaster.

Herman Haupt: Responsible in large measure for the outstanding success of the Union Army's military railroad system in the War between the States.

Samuel M. Plummer: Infantryman, fought in the Mexican War and served on the western frontier, where he died.

Alexander M. Mitchell: Infantryman, fought in the Second Seminole War, and left the Army within three years; civil engineer and territorial official; rejoined the Army briefly to fight in the Mexican War.

Alexander H. Tappen: Resigned after three years; no further trace of him.

William H. De Forest: Resigned after two years; a civilian lawyer, he rejoined the Union Army during the War between the States, but resigned after four months.

Philip R. Thompson: Twenty years on the western frontier, fought Indians and fought in the Mexican War; a drinking problem led to his dismissal.

William McD. McKissack: Frontier duty, a tour of duty in the Second Seminole War, western expeditions, and fought in the Mexican War; died fairly young.

S. Theodore Tibbatts: Fought in the Second Seminole War; died three years after graduating.

James M. Wells: Resigned about four years after graduating; served briefly in the Mexican War; in the War between the States, fought for the Confederacy.

William S. Henry: Infantryman, served in Florida and on the western frontier; fought in the Mexican War and published a diary of his experiences in it.

John M. Scott: Fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican War, and served on the western frontier; died fairly young.

George W. Shaw: Resigned after a year, to become part proprietor in a steamboat line on the Ohio River.

Joseph H. Eaton: Infantryman, taught at the Military Academy, fought in the Mexican War, and served the Union as paymaster in the War between the States and fifteen years after that.

Jones M. Withers: Quit the Army almost immediately, yet served in the Mexican War; mayor of Mobile, AL both before and after the War between the States — during which he was a Confederate general who distinguished himself at Shiloh and Stone River.

Isaac V. D. Reeve: Fought in the Second Seminole War on two tours of duty several years apart, and in the Mexican War; during the War between the States, in Union administrative service.

John W. Scott: Resigned within a year; small-town lawyer and district attorney.

Larkin Smith: Served in the Seminole Wars, in the Mexican War, and in Texas; Assistant Quartermaster General of the Confederate Army.

Marsena R. Patrick: Fifteen years on the frontier, and fighting in the Mexican War; civilian career as a farmer and agricultural educator interrupted by the War between the States, in which he fought for the Union and was Provost-Marshal General of the Army of the Potomac.

Thomas B. Arden: Seven years in the Army, more than half of it teaching at the Military Academy, and the rest on western and southern frontier duty; New York State farmer for fifty years after that except for brief Union service in the War between the States.

Joseph H. Whipple: The life of an infantryman on the western frontier, and in Mexico during the war, where he died.

Lucius Bradbury: Resigned immediately; civilian merchant, government customs collector.

Robert A. Wainwright: Ordnance officer, commanded several arsenals; in the War between the States, commanded the New York Ordnance Depot.

Benjamin S. Roberts: Cavalryman, resigned within four years, but rejoined the Army after a few years of unexceptional civilian life; fought in the Mexican War, served on the western frontier — intermittently because of illness — and fought for the Union in the War between the States.

William N. Grier: Cavalryman, spent almost all his thirty‑five-year Army career on the western frontier, where he fought in the Mexican War and fought Indians; in the War between the States, he fought for the Union in Virginia.

Thomas L. Brent: His twenty-three years in the Army included combat in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican War, and ten years of quartermaster duty.

Hugh McLeod: Resigned within a year, but continued his military career in the Republic of Texas, fighting Indians and imprisoned by Mexico; died fighting for the Confederacy.


[image ALT: Valid HTML 4.01.]

Site updated: 15 Feb 13