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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1846

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

C. Seaforth Stewart: An engineer, especially of coastal works in California.

George B. McClellan: His initial successes in the Union victories in western Virginia propelled him to General-in‑Chief of the Armies, but his excessive caution led to failures and his replacement. Photograph.

Charles E. Blunt: Over forty years as a military engineer, primarily of harbors.

John G. Foster: An engineer who in the War between the States was several times breveted for gallantry in action in the Carolinas and eventually commanded various important Departments; after the war he worked in harbor improvements. Woodcut.

Edmund Hardcastle: Fought in the Mexican War, and resigned after a 10‑year Army career. Delegate to the Democratic Conventions of Charleston and Baltimore; a Marylander, he then sidestepped the War between the States: state politics, railroads, and farming were his life.

Francis T. Bryan: Topographical engineer until the outbreak of the War between the States, when he resigned; he lived nearly sixty more years, but the Register expressly notes that he held neither civil nor military office.

George H. Derby: Topographical Engineer, fought in the Mexican War and served in the West; humorous writer of Phoenixiana and the Squibob Papers.

Jesse L. Reno: Several brevets for gallantry in the Mexican War; killed in the War between the States, at the Battle of South Mountain.

Clarendon J. Wilson: Fought in the Mexican War; died in New Mexico six years after graduating.

Thomas M. Whedbee: Ordnance officer, died on sick leave within three years of graduating.

Edmund Hayes: Artilleryman, served in the Mexican War and the Third Seminole War; died seven years after graduating.

Edward C. Boynton: Artilleryman, fought in the Mexican War and served in the Third Seminole War; taught chemistry at the Military Academy and elsewhere, served as Adjutant or Quartermaster at the Academy for ten years, and was an amateur historian, publishing among other things one of the earliest histories of West Point. [+ AOG]

Darius Nash Couch: Fought in the Mexican War, served in the Third Seminole War and on the western frontier, and fought for the Union in the War between the States, commanding the II Corps.

Henry B. Sears: Fought in the Mexican War, resigning afterwards, three years after graduating; an engineer of underwater structures, and for twenty years until his death, a merchant in England.

William Dutton: Resigned immediately due to illness, and was a civilian educator and businessman; joined the Army again and fought for the Union in the War between the States, but died of illness during the war.

John A. Brown: Served in the Mexican War and two tours of duty in the Third Seminole War; fought for the Confederacy in the War between the States, and was an engineer after the war.

Thomas J. Jackson: This is Stonewall Jackson, who fought in the Mexican War and taught science and artillery at the Virginia Military Institute; and — actually mentioned by Cullum — was a valiant Confederate commander, killed at Chancellorsville.

Albert L. Magilton: Fought in the Mexican War and served in the Third Seminole War; resigned ten years after graduating but fought for a year for the Union in the War between the States; as a civilian, was an IRS agent.

Truman Seymour: Artilleryman, fought in the Mexican War and served in the Third Seminole War; fought for the Union in the War between the States.

Colville J. Minor: Sent to the California theater of the Mexican War, where he died thirteen months after graduating.

Charles C. Gilbert: Infantryman, fought in the Mexican War, against Indians on the western frontier, and for the Union in the War between the States; after the war, commanded several frontier posts, mostly in the northwest.

Marcus D. L. Simpson: Fought in the Mexican War; the last thirty-three years of his forty-two years in the Army were as a Commissary officer.

Rufus J. Bacon: Died a month after graduating.

Hamilton L. Shields: Fought in the Mexican War, but resigned within eight years of graduating and was a Vermont farmer.

John Adams: Cavalryman, fought in the Mexican War and against Indians in the West; Confederate general.

Richard H. Rush: Fought in the Mexican War, and resigned seven years after graduating; joined the Union Army and fought in the War between the States, resigning before the war was over; the Register has no information on his civilian career.

Henry A. Ehninger: Fought in the Mexican War, but resigned within three years of graduating. American consul in Cuba, where he continued to live in retirement until his death.

Thomas F. Castor: Fought in the Mexican War and served on the Pacific coast, where he fought Indians; died in California seven years after graduating.

Orren Chapman: Fought in the Mexican War and served on the western frontier, where he died fairly young.

Alexander P. Rodgers: Killed in the Mexican War within a year of graduating.

Oliver H. P. Taylor: Fought in the Mexican War, and Indians on the western frontier; killed in action twelve years after graduating.

Samuel D. Sturgis: Forty-some years in the Army as a cavalryman; fought in the Mexican War, against Indians on the western frontier, and for the Union in the War between the States.

George Stoneman: Thirty-six years in the Dragoons and Cavalry on the western frontier, fighting Indians and Mexican cross-border raiders; fought for the Union in the War between the States; after resigning, was Governor of California.

James Oakes: Cavalryman, fought in the Mexican War, against Indians on the western frontier, and for the Union in the War between the States.

William D. Smith: Cavalryman, fought in the Mexican War and served on the western frontier; served the Confederacy in the War between the States, but died (of yellow fever) only a year into the war.

George F. Evans: Fought in the Mexican War and served in California; four years after graduating, a long leave of absence for sickness, and died fairly young.

Dabney H. Maury: Fought in the Mexican War, taught at the Academy, served on the Texas and New Mexico frontier; fought for the Confederacy in the War between the States.

Innis N. Palmer: Cavalryman, fought in the Mexican War, served on the western frontier, and fought for the Union in the War between the States.

James Stuart: Cavalryman, fought in the Mexican War and against Indians in Oregon, where he was killed, five years after graduating.

Parmenas T. Turnley: Infantryman, soon specializing in Quartermaster duty and transportation; fought in the Mexican War and served the Union in the War between the States; after leaving the Army, was mayor of Highland Park, IL.

David R. Jones: Infantryman, fought in the Mexican War; in the War between the States he fought for the Confederacy, reaching the rank of Major-General.

Alfred Gibbs: Cavalryman, fought in the Mexican War, against Indians on the western frontier, and for the Union in the War between the States; died suddenly, still young, on the western frontier after the war.

George H. Gordon: Cavalryman, fought in the Mexican War and for the Union in the War between the States; in civilian life, an attorney.

Frederic Myers: Infantryman, fought in the Mexican War, served on the western frontier, and as Quartermaster in the Union Army in the War between the States.

DeLancey Floyd-Jones: Infantryman, fought in the Mexican War, against Indians in the Pacific Northwest, and for the Union in the War between the States; commanded various frontier posts for fifteen years after the war.

John D. Wilkins: Infantryman; fought in the Mexican War and for the Union in the War between the States, and the remainder of his forty years in the Army were spent on the western frontier.

Joseph N. G. Whistler: Infantryman; fought in the Mexican War and for the Union in the War between the States, and the remainder of his forty years in the Army were spent on the western frontier.

Thomas Easley: Killed in the Mexican War a year after graduating.

Nelson H. Davis: Nearly forty years in the Army: fought as an infantryman in the Mexican War, but made his later career as an Inspector-General in the Union Army in the War between the States, and on the western frontier after the war.

Thomas R. McConnell: Infantryman, fought in the Mexican War, after which he was posted to various western garrisons, leaving the Army within ten years of graduating; died five years later.

Matthew R. Stevenson: To all appearances, an unhappy and mixed career: dismissal, although followed by reappointment, then in the War between the States a surrender to Confederates by his superior officer, followed soon after by his death on sick leave, while still young.

George S. Humphreys: Died in cavalry training a year after graduating.

William H. Tyler: Infantryman, fought in the Mexican War; died seven years after graduating.

Cadmus M. Wilcox: Fought in the Mexican War, the Third Seminole War, and for the Confederacy in the War between the States; wrote a manual on rifle practice and a history of the Mexican War.

William M. Gardner: Infantryman, fought in the Mexican War and served on the western frontier; fought for the Confederacy in the War between the States. [+ AOG]

Edmund Russell: Infantryman, fought in the Mexican War, then against Indians in California, and was killed, six years after graduating.

Archibald B. Botts: Died in Mexico during the Mexican War, a few months after graduating.

Samuel Bell Maxey: Fought in the Mexican War, but left the Army after three years; his career as a lawyer and court official in Kentucky and Texas was interrupted by the War between the States, in which he fought for the Confederacy; after the war, he represented Texas in the U. S. Senate.

George E. Pickett: Fought in the Mexican War then against Indians in the Pacific Northwest; is forever remembered by leading the gallant but unsuccessful Confederate charge at Gettysburg (not mentioned in the Register).


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Page updated: 15 Feb 13