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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1869

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

Eric Bergland: Twenty-six years as an Army Engineer, eleven of them teaching at the Military Academy. Before becoming a Cadet, was a lieutenant of Union Volunteers in the War between the States.

Leonard J. Hun: Honorably discharged from the Army a year after graduating; practiced law.

Samuel E. Tillman: Retired after forty-two years in the Army, over thirty of them as a professor of chemistry at the Military Academy, he returned to duty as its Superintendent during World War I.

Philip M. Price: Twenty-five years as an Engineer, working primarily on geographical exploration and river and harbor improvements.

Daniel M. Taylor: An ordnance officer for nearly forty years; by the end of his career he had commanded several arsenals.

William C. Fitzsimmons: Resigned six months after graduating; a shifting career as an editor, real estate agent, banker, fruit grower and miner.

William P. Duvall: Artilleryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; returned there at the end of his career, as commander of the Philippines Division.

Jacob A. Augur: Cavalryman, served twenty-five years on the western frontier, and fought insurgents in the Philippines.

Henry L. Harris: Forty years in the Artillery, almost entirely at coastal forts.

Arthur S. Hardy: Resigned after a year; taught mathematics and engineering, author of textbooks in those subjects, also of romantic novels; editor of Cosmopolitan Magazine, diplomat.

John G. Bourke: As an enlisted man in the Union Army in the War between the States before attending West Point, he was awarded the Medal of Honor; after graduating, fought Indians on the western frontier and was an ethnologist of note.

David A. Lyle: Ordnance officer: the inventor of the marine life-saving device known as the Lyle gun.

Worth Osgood: Left the Army a year and a half after graduating; a patent examiner and attorney.

Remembrance H. Lindsey: Resigned a year after graduating; corporate lawyer and banker.

Charles H. Rea: Resigned a year after graduating; a merchant in St. Louis.

James E. Porter: Cavalryman, killed at the Little Big Horn seven years after graduating.

Frank E. Nye: Resigned within four years of graduating; eleven years as a civilian followed by his return to the Army, as a commissary, for twenty years: served in Puerto Rico just after the Spanish-American War.

William T. Craycroft: Cavalryman, served mostly on the western frontier, but retired for disability nine years after graduating; as a civilian, in the insurance and newspaper business.

Charles Braden: Cavalryman, severely wounded in combat against Indians and retired for disability nine years after graduating; principal of a preparatory school for West Point, Secretary of the Association of Graduates of the Military Academy, contributed to Vols. I‑IV of the Register and was the Editor of Vol. V.

John Aspinwall: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier, but dropped five years after graduating; died not long after.

John W. Pullman: Forty years in the Army, first as a cavalryman on the western frontier, then as a quartermaster with increasingly high commands.

Franklin Yeaton: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier and died two years after graduating. [+ AOG]

Earl D. Thomas: Cavalryman, much of his career being connected with the inspection of horses; fought Indians on the western frontier, served in Puerto Rico shortly after the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency, as well as in Cuba.

William I. Reese: Cavalryman, died three years after graduating.

Charles Morton: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier and insurgents in the Philippines.

Charles H. Rockwell: Cavalryman, spent almost all his career on the western frontier, where he fought Indians.

Wells W. Leggett: Resigned almost immediately; lawyer and corporate executive.

Jenifer H. Smallwood: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier, but resigned four years after graduating; in civilian life, a drug manufacturer.

William F. Smith: Declined his commission upon graduation. A New York merchant.

George R. Bacon: Cavalryman, served in the Far West including in the Modoc campaign; resigned nine years after graduating and was a printer and stationer.

Henry P. Perrine: Cavalryman; his entire twenty-two years in the Army were spent on the western frontier.

William W. Robinson: Cavalryman, thirty years on the western frontier, fighting Indians in the upper Midwest; chief quartermaster of various divisions and departments, including in the Philippines.

Wentz C. Miller: Served ten years in the cavalry, in Texas and the Midwest; the Register has no information on his life as a civilian.

William Rawson: Died on his graduation leave.

Edward W. Brady: Left the army a year and a half after graduating; a newspaper editor.

Henry W. Sprole: Cavalryman, served twenty years on the western frontier, then in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Martin B. Hughes: Cavalryman; nearly all of his 37‑year Army career was on the western frontier, although he served in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William Gerhard: Resigned after five years; a manufacturer of chains and anchors.

Mason M. Maxon: Cavalryman, served thirty years on the western frontier; after a period of disability, taught military science for nine more.


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Page updated: 22 May 14