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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1870

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

Francis V. Greene: Engineer in the Army for sixteen years, often on special assignments; in civilian life, president and director of various electrical power and construction firms; author of books on military subjects; in the Army again for the few months of the Spanish-American War, as a top-level administrator.

Winfield S. Chaplin: Resigned from the Army after not quite two years; taught civil engineering at universities in Japan and the United States; Chancellor of Washington University, St. Louis.

Edward S. Holden: Resigned from the Army after not quite three years, to become one of the country's leading astronomers, first at the U. S. Naval Academy then as director of the Washburn Observatory and the Lick Observatory; President of the University of California; editor of the 4th volume of Cullum's Register; Librarian at the Military Academy.

Carl F. Palfrey: Engineer; thirty years in the Army, mostly in river and harbor improvements.

James Rockwell: Forty years in Ordnance, mostly on the western frontier. Fought in the Modoc War and in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War.

Edward E. Wood: Taught modern languages at the Military Academy for thirty years, most of them as full Professor.

William B. Weir: Artilleryman, served in various arsenals, mostly in the East, but was killed by Indians in Wyoming nine years after graduating.

William R. Quinan: Eleven years in the Artillery, serving in coastal forts; after leaving the Army, manufactured explosives.

Edward S. Chapin: Twenty-six years in the Artillery, almost all of them in the Midwest and on the western frontier.

Henry A. Reed: Forty years in the Artillery; wrote several books on military subjects, taught eight years at the Military Academy; in the Spanish-American War, fought in Puerto Rico.

William B. Homer: Artilleryman; served in coastal forts and as an instructor; with a tour of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Rollin B. Ives: Commissioned in the Artillery, in which he served for five years, he then started to make a career as a professor, teaching four years at the Academy; but died young, nine years after graduating.

James A. Dennison: Resigned two years after graduating; a New York lawyer.

Edward G. Stevens: Resigned after a year; insurance agent.

Edgar S. Dudley: Artilleryman and military law specialist, served as judge advocate of various departments and as legal adviser to the military governor of Cuba in the Spanish-American War; taught at the University of Nebraska and eight years at the Academy.

Clarence A. Postley: Artilleryman; about half of his twelve years in the Army were teaching mathematics at the Military Academy.

Charles W. Burrows: Resigned two years after graduating; bookseller and publisher of historical works.

Ira Mac Nutt: Ordnance officer, inspector of ordnance, commanded Sandy Hook Proving Ground and several large arsenals.

William E. Birkhimer: Artilleryman: fought insurgents in the Philippines (Medal of Honor); author of books on military law and history. Before he was a Cadet, fought for the Union as an enlisted man in the War between the States.

Walter S. Schuyler: Indian fighter, twenty-five years on the western frontier. Served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in Cuba not long after the Spanish-American War.

Benjamin H. Randolph: Artilleryman, served mostly in the East; fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War and afterwards.

Charles A. H. McCauley: Thirty-nine years in the Army; served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and ended his career as a high-ranking quartermaster.

Richard A. Williams: Twenty years as a cavalryman, all on the western frontier; fought Indians and scouted.

Edward C. Edgerton: Resigned two years after graduating; manufacturer of agricultural equipment and in the grain elevator business.

Daniel C. Pearson: Cavalryman, twenty-five years on the western frontier, and served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Clinton H. Tebbetts: Resigned two years after graduating; in civilian life, held an assortment of clerical and administrative positions; among them the superintendency of two military schools. [+ AOG]

Alexander O. Brodie: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier seven years and resigned; cattle raising, mining and political pursuits mostly in Arizona, where he became Territorial Governor. A second Army career of fifteen years with fighting in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and service in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Charles W. Larned: Served four years in the Cavalry, including combat against Indians on the Yellowstone Expedition; then taught drawing at the Academy for thirty-five years to his death. [+ AOG]

Edmund M. Cobb: Artilleryman, served in various coastal forts; died fairly young.

Austin L. Peirce: Cavalryman, died within six months of graduating.

Edward A. Godwin: Cavalryman stationed more than thirty years on the western frontier and in the Pacific Northwest; served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Samuel W. Fountain: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier where he was stationed over twenty years; served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Frederick K. Ward: Forty years in the Cavalry, almost all of it on the western frontier; served two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency; ended his career as Commandant of the Cavalry School.

Robert E. Coxe: Resigned four years after graduation; in civilian life, a hardware merchant.

Peter S. Bomus: Cavalryman, served twenty years in the Pacific Northwest; fought Apaches and other Indians elsewhere on the western frontier, and two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Edward J. McClernand: Cavalryman, served thirty years on the western frontier, and fought Indians (Medal of Honor); also in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Frederick E. Phelps: Twenty years in the Cavalry, most of it on the western frontier and often fighting Indians. Retired for disability but continued in the Army in various capacities for another decade.

Robert G. Carter: Six years in the Cavalry, fighting Indians on the western frontier (Medal of Honor); retired for disability. Wrote voluminously on military and genealogical subjects.

Dexter W. Parker: Resigned after a year; executive of several manufacturing companies.

Charles B. Schofield: Cavalryman, served twenty-eight years on the western frontier and fought Indians; in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, where he died.

Frederick W. Kingsbury: Twenty-seven years in the Cavalry, entirely on the western frontier; fought Indians.

John G. Kyle: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier, but died seven years after graduating.

Jerauld A. Olmsted: Most of his forty years in the Army was spent in the Cavalry on the western frontier, where he served in Indian campaigns. [+ AOG]

Francis Michler: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier and as a high-level staff officer.

Benjamin H. Hodgson: Cavalryman, killed by Indians at Little Big Horn, six years after graduating.

Edwin H. Shelton: Cavalryman, served his entire career in the Far West; died nine years after graduating.

Otto L. Hein: Cavalryman, over twenty years on the western frontier and a year in the Philippines during the insurgency; Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy.

Sebree Smith: Cavalryman, later Artillery; his thirty years in the Army were about evenly divided between the western frontier and eastern coastal garrisons. [+ AOG]

Orlando L. Wieting: Twenty-one years in the Cavalry, stationed almost his entire career on the western frontier; retired for disability and died shortly afterward.

Winfield S. Edgerly: Thirty-nine years in the Cavalry, mostly in the Upper Midwest, where he fought Indians; also served in Cuba, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

John B. Kerr: Thirty-nine years in the Cavalry: fought Indians on the western frontier (Medal of Honor) and Spaniards in Cuba; commanded the Cavalry School.

Clarence A. Stedman: Thirty-eight years in the Cavalry, almost all on the western frontier, occasionally fighting Indians; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and served there after the war.

Isaiah H. McDonald: Resigned three years after graduating; in civilian life, a patent examiner and attorney, and a pension examiner for the Federal government.

John Conline: Before becoming a Cadet, served as an enlisted man, fighting for the Union in the War between the States. After graduating, twenty years in the Cavalry on the western frontier; after his retirement from the Army, was police commissioner of Detroit for several years.

Robert N. Price: Resigned within two years after graduating, and went into the stationery business; died fairly young.

Daniel H. Floyd: Twenty-four years in the Army, about evenly divided among the Cavalry, the Infantry, and Quartermaster duty: most of them on the western frontier.

Lovell H. Jerome: Cavalryman, resigned after nine years on the western frontier; executive of several mining companies; nearly thirty years in the Customs Service.

Levi P. Hunt: Thirty-nine years in the Cavalry, almost all of it on the western frontier; short tours of duty in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.


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Page updated: 2 Jun 14