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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1871

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

James R. Wasson: Before becoming a Cadet, served as an enlisted man in the War between the States. Resigned a year after graduating from the Academy; a University professor, engineer, and surveyor in Japan, a colonel in the Japanese Army, fought in Formosa. He returned to the United States Army, serving seven years as a paymaster until dismissed. Served as an enlisted man in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Edgar Z. Steever: Cavalryman: served on the western frontier, was secretary of the Intercontinental Railway Commission; fought insurgents in the Philippines.

James C. Ayres: Ordnance officer; by the end of his career he was among the top men in the Ordnance Office.

Andrew H. Russell: Ordnance officer: instructor, technical writer; served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

George S. Anderson: Cavalryman, served over twenty years on the western frontier, fought Indians, Superintendent of Yellowstone National Park; fought insurgents for several years in the Philippines.

Vinton A. Goddard: Served on the western frontier, in Alaska, and at the Military Academy, but died six years after graduating. [+ AOG]

Frank H. Edmunds: Infantryman, served twenty years on the western frontier; died of yellow fever in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War.

Reid T. Stewart: Cavalryman, killed by Indians a year after graduating [+ AOG]

Charles C. Morrison: Eight years in the Cavalry on the western frontier; fifteen years in Ordnance.

George B. Davis: Scholar and author, taught law and chaired the History Department at the Military Academy; in charge of the publication of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies; Judge Advocate-General of the Army, delegate to the Geneva Peace Conference of 1906 and The Hague Peace Conference of 1907.

Charles A. Woodruff: Before becoming a Cadet, fought in the Union Army in the War between the States. After graduating, fought Indians on the western frontier and was severely wounded: the rest of his career in increasing commands in the Commissary of Subsistence.

Walter S. Wyatt: Sixteen years in the Army, nine of them teaching chemistry and geology at the Military Academy.

Wallace Mott: Twenty years in the Army, ten of them teaching mathematics and science at the Military Academy.

George E. Bacon: Infantryman; six years in Southern garrisons, five years teaching at the Military Academy, and died on the western frontier, still young.

Thomas M. Woodruff: Infantryman, fought Indians on the western frontier, served in Southern garrisons, fought in the Spanish-American War in Cuba; died of yellow fever there after the war.

Leverett H. Walker: Artilleryman, served his entire career in the United States, leaving the country only once: a three-month leave in Japan just after the Russo-Japanese War.

Richard H. Poillon: Resigned three years after graduating; a variety of pursuits in civilian life, among them holding the position of Fire Commissioner of Brooklyn for a while; in later life, an invalid.

Henry P. Kingsbury: Forty-three years in the Cavalry: served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served three tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Andrew H. Nave: Thirteen years in the Cavalry on the western frontier; retired for disability.

Frederick Schwatka: Noted polar explorer and author; led an expedition in search of the remains of Sir John Franklin's crew. [+ AOG]

John A. McKinney: Cavalryman, killed fighting Indians five years after graduating.

James N. Allison: Twenty-two years in the Cavalry on the western frontier; the remainder of his career in the Subsistence Department, including two years in the Philippines during the insurgency.

James B. Hickey: Before becoming a Cadet, served as a surgeon in the Navy in the War between the States. After graduating, thirty-seven years in the Cavalry, almost all on the western frontier except for tours of duty in Cuba and the Philippines after the Spanish-American War.

Charles H. Ribbel: Resigned after three years, and was a lawyer for forty-some years, serving briefly as Judge Advocate in the U. S. Volunteers during the Spanish-American War.

George F. Chase: Forty years in the Cavalry: twenty-five years on the western frontier, fought insurgents in the Philippines, and ended his career as a high-level inspector.

Ulysses S. White: Resigned two years after graduating; thirty-three years in the Navy's Bureau of Yards and Docks.

Thomas T. Knox: Cavalryman, fought Indians in the Pacific Northwest, worked eleven years on the compilation of Official Records of the Rebellion; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

Francis W. Mansfield: Forty-one years in the Infantry, including twenty-five years on the western frontier, fighting Spaniards in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War, and two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

James Fornance: Infantryman, served twenty-seven years in garrisons mostly in the South and on the western frontier; died fighting the Spanish in Cuba in the Spanish-American War. [+ AOG]

Henry E. Robinson: Thirty-seven years in the Infantry, twenty-seven of them on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William B. Wheeler: Infantryman, twenty-seven years on the western frontier, and fought insurgents in the Philippines.

Daniel H. Brush: Forty-one years in the Infantry: fought Indians on the western frontier, Spaniards in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, insurgents in the Philippines.

John McA. Webster: Infantryman: his entire 27‑year Army career spent in Western garrisons; after retirement, an Indian agent.

Charles R. Ward: Cavalryman, seventeen years on the western frontier, succumbed to drunkenness and dismissed.

Alexander McC. Guard: Twenty-eight years in the Infantry, mostly on the western frontier; served in Puerto Rico during and after the Spanish-American War.

Thomas S. Mumford: Twenty years in the Infantry, one‑third spent in Southern garrisons, the remaining two‑thirds on the western frontier.

Frederick D. Grant: Son of the President; ten years in the Army, then Ambassador to Vienna, police commissioner of New York City, then fourteen more years in the Army, serving in the Spanish-American War, mostly in the Philippines.

Thomas G. Townsend: Twenty-five years in the Infantry, almost all on the western frontier.

William R. Hoag: Infantryman, died in the Pacific Northwest four years after graduating.

Fayette W. Roe: Twenty-seven years in the Infantry, about half of them in the Pacific Northwest.

Julius H. Pardee: Served fourteen years in the Infantry on the western frontier, resigned, and was a New Mexico rancher.


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Page updated: 10 Jun 14