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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1873

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

William H. Bixby: Engineer, mostly of river and harbor improvements in the Northeast; Chief of Engineers; recalled briefly during World War I.

Henry S. Taber: Engineer, taught five years at the Military Academy, worked on river and harbor improvements in the southern Midwest.

William T. Rossell: Thirty-five years as an Army engineer, much of it in river and harbor improvement; Chief Engineer of the Army.

Thomas N. Bailey: Engineer; worked on the geodetic survey of the Northern Lakes and taught at the Military Academy.

John A. Lundeen: Over forty years in the Artillery; served a year in the Philippines, commanded several forts and the Coast Artillery School.

Charles A. L. Totten: Artilleryman, but mostly a professor of military science and a prolific writer on mystical interpretations of the Bible. [+ AOG]

Jacob E. Bloom: Six years in the Artillery, and resigned; a civilian career in law for eighteen years; rejoined the Army in the Spanish-American War, serving in Cuba, then fifteen more years in the Army as a commissary, including service in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William H. Coffin: Thirty-nine years in the Artillery: taught five years at the Military Academy, served briefly in the Philippines during the insurgency, commanded two Eastern seaboard artillery districts.

Joseph H. Dorst: Cavalryman, fought Indians in the West, Spaniards in Cuba, and insurgents in the Philippines.

Albert S. Cummins: Artilleryman, fought Indians on the western frontier, taught military science for seven years, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Joseph Garrard: Artilleryman, fought Indians on the western frontier, served in the Philippines during the insurgency and in Cuba.

Ezra B. Fuller: Thirty years in the Cavalry: fought Indians on the western frontier, served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, taught at the Military Academy and in civilian institutions; after retirement, executive of several Army associations.

Alexander B. DyerJr: Forty years in the Artillery: most of it on the western frontier, where he fought Indians, and in the Pacific Northwest; fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War; taught five years at the Military Academy.

Joshua L. Knapp: Artilleryman, drowned four years after graduating.

George S. Hoyle: Twenty-eight years in the Cavalry, most of it on the western frontier, including fighting Indians in the Pacific Northwest.

Edward T. Brown: Thirty-eight years in the Artillery, mostly in Eastern coastal forts; served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

George H. Paddock: Eleven years in the Artillery, then twenty-two in the Cavalry; fought Indians in the West, served in Puerto Rico just after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Robert London: Nineteen years in the Cavalry, all except his last year on the western frontier, where he fought Indians.

Bainbridge Reynolds: Eighteen years in the Cavalry, entirely spent on the western frontier, often fighting Indians.

George F. E. Harrison: Thirty-five years in the Artillery and Coast Artillery, at least nine of them teaching; commanded the Artillery School.

John E. Myers: Twenty years in the Artillery, mostly in Eastern seaboard forts and teaching.

Frederick A. Smith: Forty years in the Infantry, most of it on the western frontier; served a year in Cuba just ater the Spanish-American War, and five years in the Philippines during the insurgency.

George A. Cornish: Thirty years in the Infantry, almost all on the western frontier; served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, and nearly three years in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Edwin T. Howard: Resigned eighteen months after graduating; an industrial ceramic manufacturer.

Calvin D. Cowles: Forty years in the Infantry: on the western frontier, in the War Records Office; several years in both Cuba and the Philippines during the insurgency.

George O. Eaton: Ten years in the Cavalry, all on the western frontier, where he fought Indians; in civilian life, a mining executive and an expert on explosives.

Daniel Cornman: Forty-one years in the Infantry: the first twenty-five on the western frontier, then fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served two tours of duty in the Philippines, where he fought insurgents.

Henry C. LaPoint: Fifteen years in the Cavalry on the western frontier; dismissed, and died within a few months.

Dillard H. Clark: Eighteen years in the Infantry, mostly on the western frontier; taught military science for many years in semi-retirement, and was on active service on the home front during World War I. Before becoming a cadet, served in the War between the States as an enlisted cavalryman in the Union Army.AOG

Hoel S. Bishop: Forty years in the Cavalry: fought Indians on the western frontier, served in Puerto Rico just after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Augustus C. Tyler: Five years in the Cavalry on the western frontier; a tea planter in South Carolina.

Charles M. O'Connor: Forty-two years in the Cavalry, almost all spent on the western frontier; served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, and fought insurgents in the Philippines.

Samuel N. Holmes: Infantryman, dismissed six years after graduating for making fraudulent claims against the government; died the following year.

Edward W. Casey: Infantryman; taught at the Military Academy, but served most of the rest of his life on the western frontier, where he was killed by an Indian seventeen years after graduating.

William H. Carter: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier and fought Indians there (Medal of Honor); prepared legislation establishing the General Staff and streamlining the Army; fought insurgents in the Philippines, organized troop concentration along the Mexican border and mustering of troops for World War I.

Hugh T. Reed: Fought Indians in the Upper Midwest, retiring for disability after sixteen years; author on military subjects, publisher, inventor.

Cornelius Gardener: Forty years in the Infantry, on the western frontier and in the Pacific Northwest; fought insurgents in the Philippines.

Louis P. Brant: Infantryman, resigned within three years of graduating, but not long after, rejoined the Army: his twenty-year career was almost all on the western frontier and in California.

Edgar S. Beacom: Resigned within four years of graduating; then a customs collector in Texas, but died fairly young.

Quincy O'M. Gillmore: Twenty-two years of a rather mixed career: western frontier duty, an artillery command, some teaching, four years as a quartermaster.

Joseph F. Huston: Thirty years in the Infantry, most of it on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.


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Page updated: 19 Jul 14