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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1874

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

Thomas W. Symons: Twenty-four years as an Army Engineer, with varied duties over the years: geographical exploration, siting of posts, road construction, river and harbor improvements, boundary reconnoissance, charge of buildings and grounds at the Pan-American Exposition.

Arthur Murray: Artilleryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; rose to Chief of Artillery; kept in service past the legal retirement age, by special Act of Congress.

Henry M. Andrews: Thirty-six years in the Artillery: twenty-four years at Eastern coastal stations, the remainder of his career in the Field Artillery, with two years fighting insurgents in the Philippines.

Montgomery M. Macomb: Forty-two years in the Artillery: fought in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War, fought insurgents in the Philippines, observed the Russo-Japanese War; taught, published, involved in planning, and ended his career as President of the Army War College.

James L. Wilson: Twenty-seven years in the Artillery, mostly stationed in coastal forts; served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War. Before becoming a Cadet, fought for the Union in the War between the States.

Frank S. Rice: Sixteen years in the Artillery, almost all in coastal garrisons; after retirement for disability, he was a banker although he served a year as a Volunteer in the Philippines just after the Spanish-American War.

John T. Honeycutt: Twenty-four years in the Artillery: sixteen in coastal garrisons, and eight in teaching, half of which at the Military Academy. [+ AOG]

George L. Anderson: Thirty-four years in the Artillery; wrote a technical manual on the new area of electrical plants for fortifications. [+ AOG]

John P. Wisser: Forty-two years in the Artillery: taught chemistry at the Military Academy for twelve years, instructor at the Artillery School, editor of the Artillery Journal; commanded the Hawaiian Department.

Joseph S. Oyster: Twenty-three years in the Artillery, mostly in Eastern garrisons; taught at the Military Academy and at Stanford University.

Orin B. Mitcham: Forty-three years in the Army, in the Artillery and Ordnance: taught eight years at the Military Academy, and commanded some of the most important ordnance facilities.

Albert H. Mellen: Artilleryman, died two years after graduating.

Clarence Deems: Thirty-seven years in the Artillery, almost all of it in coastal forts in large cities Stateside; fought insurgents in the Philippines. [+ AOG]

Wright P. Edgerton: Thirty years in the Army, twenty of them teaching mathematics at the Military Academy, and ending his career as full Professor.

Edgar B. Robertson: Thirty-three years in the Infantry: fought Indians on the western frontier and Spaniards in Cuba, served in the Boxer Reborn Expedition and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Edmund K. Webster: Twenty-seven years in the Infantry, much of it in the Pacific Northwest; fought Indians on the frontier, served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Russell Thayer: Resigned almost immediately; in civilian life, a transportation systems engineer and an inventor of chemical processes. [+ AOG]

George R. Cecil: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry: served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Harrison G. Otis: Resigned seven years after graduating; a structural and construction engineer. [+ AOG]

Charles H. Cabaniss: Seventeen years in the Infantry, stationed mainly in the South and in Montana; taught military science in various colleges for another sixteen years.

Charles W. Rowell: Infantryman, killed in action at San Juan Hill in the Spanish-American War.

Frederick W. Sibley: Forty-two years in the Cavalry: fought Indians on the western frontier, served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, fought insurgents in the Philippines, served in the Mexican Punitive Expedition; Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy.

Charles C. Norton: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier; after he left the Army, a Nevada rancher.

Charles E. S. Wood: Ten years in the Infantry: fought Indians in the Pacific Northwest, and accepted the surrender of Chief Joseph. His civilian career, as a lawyer and a poet, spanned sixty years.

Luther R. Hare: Twenty-nine years in the Cavalry, fighting Indians on the western frontier and, more signally, insurgents in the Philippines.

Willis Wittich: Twenty-eight years in the Infantry: fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

George L. Turner: Sixteen years in the Infantry, in the South and on the western frontier; dismissed from the Army.

Alfred Reynolds: Thirty-seven years in the Infantry: served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and fought insurgents in the Philippines.

William L. Geary: An intermittent Army career in the Commissary Department, with fourteen years as a civilian in commercial pursuits; served in Cuba during the Spanish-American War, and later in the Philippines.

William S. Davies: Thirteen years in the Infantry, almost all in Louisiana and New Mexico; died still young.

Christian C. Hewitt: Twenty-seven years in the Infantry; fought Indians on the western frontier, served in Puerto Rico just after the Spanish-American War.

Henry P. Walker: Infantryman, fought Indians in the West; died six years after graduating.

Louis A. Craig: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier, taught at the Military Academy, fought in Cuba and Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Edward E. Hardin: Thirty-four years in the Infantry: fought Indians on the western frontier, and insurgents in two tours of duty in the Philippines.

Charles R. Tyler: Thirty years in the Infantry: served in the South and on the western frontier, in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Charles A. Williams: Thirty-six years in the Infantry: fought Indians on the western frontier, Spaniards Cuba, and insurgents in the Philippines, where he spent three tours of duty.

Marion P. Maus: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry: fought Indians on the western frontier (Medal of Honor), served in Cuba and Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War, fought Moros in the Philippine insurgency.

Charles F. Lloyd: Served on the western frontier and in Indian campaigns but resigned nine years after graduating; a Montana rancher and miner.

Theodore H. Eckerson: Twenty years in the Infantry; fought Indians on the western frontier.

William H. Wheeler: Seventeen years in the Infantry; fought Indians on the western frontier.

J. Hansell French: Killed by Indians in New Mexico. [+ AOG]


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Page updated: 11 Dec 14