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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1875

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

Smith S. Leach: Thirty-three years as an Army Engineer, mostly of river and harbor improvements; editor of Engineer's Field Manual.

Dan C. Kingman: Forty years as an Engineer, mostly of river and harbor improvements; Chief of Engineers.

Eugene Griffin: Fourteen years as an Army Engineer; senior executive of several pioneering international electric equipment firms.

Willard Young: Fifteen years in the Corps of Engineers, mostly in river and harbor improvements; contracting engineer and church official. Served in the Army briefly again, in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War.

Lotus Niles: Artilleryman; in charge of civilian relief efforts in Cuba after the Spanish-American War.

William A. Simpson: Artilleryman: served for over twenty years almost exclusively at Northeastern posts, then as Adjutant General of various departments, including the Philippines during the insurgency.

Charles A. Tingle: Served on the western frontier, often on Signal Corps duty, but resigned seven years after graduating, and vanished into civilian life.

Tasker H. Bliss: Over forty years in the Army, in the Artillery and the Commissary Department; served in Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War, and as provincial military governor in the Philippines during the insurgency; eventually rose to President of the Army War College and Chief of Staff.

Charles H. Clark: Forty years as an ordnance officer, retiring in command of the San Antonio Arsenal. [+ AOG]

John P. Jefferson: Resigned seven years after graduating; a civilian career in multiple businesses in energy, lumber, and banking.

Victor H. Bridgman: Twenty-eight years in the Artillery; fought insurgents in the Philippines. [+ AOG]

John M. Baldwin: Artilleryman, resigning nine years after graduating to become a lawyer.

Elbert Wheeler: Resigned two years after graduating; company executive for several water companies.

Erasmus M. Weaver: Artilleryman, often a professor or instructor, including three years at the Military Academy; ended his career as Chief of the Coast Artillery Corps.

Myron W. Howe: Artilleryman, died four years after graduating. [+ AOG]

James R. McAuliffe: Artilleryman, posted to eastern and southern garrisons; died seven years after graduating.

James M. Jones: Artilleryman, fought Indians on the western frontier and taught at the Military Academy; died fairly young.

Eli D. Hoyle: Forty years in the Artillery, mostly field artillery; served in Cuba and the Philippines.

James C. Bush: Thirty years in the Artillery; commanded the Philippine Artillery District during the insurgency.

Edwin P. Andrus: Forty-four years in the Cavalry, much of it as an instructor, inspector, recruiting officer; fought Indians on the western frontier, served in Puerto Rico just after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William N. Dykman: Resigned a year after graduating; a New York lawyer and corporate executive.

George B. Backus: Twenty years in the Cavalry: fought Indians on the western frontier.

Stanton A. Mason: Died fifteen years after graduating, having spent his entire career on the western frontier, where he fought Indians.

Robert P. P. Wainwright: Twenty-seven years in the Cavalry: fought Indians on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William A. Mann: Infantryman: fought the Sioux on the western plains, Spaniards in Cuba, and insurgents in the Philippines; and in France in World War I.

Henry D. Huntington: Cavalryman, served eleven years on the western frontier, and died young.

Timothy A. Touey: Cavalryman, served in scouting and Indian expeditions in the Far West; died fairly young.

William Baird: Forty-three years in the Cavalry, much of it on the western frontier; inspector of Indian supplies, and later for many years of the Maryland militia.

James G. Sturgis: Cavalryman, killed at Little Big Horn a year after graduating.

Alexander Rodgers: Thirty-five years in the Cavalry: served on the western frontier, fought in the Philippines during the insurgency; several diplomatic and quasi-diplomatic assignments.

George R. Smith: Thirty years as a paymaster: served in the Indian wars, in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in Cuba during the occupation; rose to Paymaster General of the Army.

Joseph H. Gustin: Nineteen years in the Infantry, entirely on the western frontier and in the Pacific Northwest.

George L. Scott: Thirty years in the Cavalry: almost entirely on the western frontier, often commanding Indian scouts or serving as Indian agent; served in Puerto Rico during or just after the Spanish-American War.

Francis E. Eltonhead: Twenty-eight years in the Cavalry: fought Indians on the western frontier and fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

Samuel A. Cherry: Cavalryman: served on the western frontier, but was killed by one of his own soldiers within six years of graduating. [+ AOG]

Thomas F. Davis: Forty-two years in the Infantry: fought Indians on the western frontier and in Mexico, served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War and in the Philippine Islands during the insurgency.

James B. Goe: Thirty-three years in the Infantry: fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, customs collector in the Philippines during the insurgency.

John G. Ballance: Twenty-nine years in the Infantry, fought the Sioux in the upper Midwest and insurgents in the Philippines.

Edwin B. Bolton: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry: fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War and afterward in the insurgency.

Arthur L. Wagner: Infantryman, taught military science and published several influential books on the subject.

Thomas S. McCaleb: Infantryman; served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and fought insurgents in the Philippines.

Robert K. Evans: Infantryman, fought Indians in the Far West, Spaniards in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, insurgents in the Philippines; organized national rifle competitions and regional aero clubs.

Charles W. Williams: Infantryman, mostly in Western posts; a quartermaster for twenty years, and died in Cuba during the Spanish-American War.


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Page updated: 17 Dec 14