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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1877

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

William M. Black: Forty-six years as an Army engineer, mostly in harbor improvements; fought in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War; served in Cuba and Panama; rose to Chief of Engineers.

Walter L. Fisk: Engineer, mostly of coastal defensive works and lighthouses; served on the Northern Lakes and in the Philippines.

Solomon W. Roessler: Forty years an Army Engineer, mostly in torpedo defense and river and harbor improvement, especially of New York harbor.

Thomas C. Patterson: Seventeen years in the Artillery, of which four teaching at the Military Academy; died while still young.

Albert Todd: Thirty-three years in the Artillery: served in at least one Indian campaign on the western frontier, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William B. Gordon: Ordnance officer; taught twenty-four years at the Military Academy (sixteen of them as full Professor) and wrote two textbooks for the use of cadets.

Howard A. Springett: Resigned after seven years in the Artillery, two of which were spent teaching at the Military Academy.

William W. Galbraith: Artilleryman, posted most of his career to Eastern and Southern garrisons; taught four years at the Military Academy, retired for disability fairly young.

Solon F. Massey: Artilleryman, posted mostly to Eastern garrisons; in his retirement, worked briefly with the government in special shipping projects after the Spanish-American War.

John J. Haden: Nineteen years in the Infantry, fought Indians in the Far West.

Charles G. Woodward: Thirty-four years in the Artillery: two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Adam Slaker: Thirty-seven years in the Artillery, rose to command major coastal forts and artillery districts; recalled from retirement in World War I to command the coastal defenses of the Potomac.

John V. White: Thirty-eight years in the Artillery, rose to command major coastal forts and artillery districts.

Frederick Marsh: Thirty-six years in the Artillery, always in coastal forts except for two years teaching at the Military Academy and a few months in the Philippines during the insurgency.

David Price: Twenty-nine years in the Artillery; taught four years at the Military Academy and was Commandant of Cadets at the Virginia Military Institute.

Francis P. Blair: Resigned five years after graduating; in civilian life, a medical doctor and a lawyer, lecturing and authoring books on jurisprudence.

James C. Shofner: Resigned within four years; in the grocery and fruit farming business in Oregon.

Fred W. Foster: Thirty-four years in the Cavalry: twenty years on the western frontier, also served in Puerto Rico just after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Theophilus Parker: Resigned two years after graduating; a railway agent and superintendent for the rest of his life, except a year in the Army as a volunteer fighting in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

Edward H. Plummer: Forty years in the Infantry, nearly half of them on the western frontier; served in Cuba during the Spanish-American War, in the Philippines during the insurgency, and on the Mexican Punitive Expedition; with the British and French armies in France in World War I.

Medad C. Martin: Thirty years in the Army, most of them as a quartermaster; served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Augustus P. Blocksom: Cavalryman; fought Indians in Arizona and the Dakotas, Spaniards in Cuba, Chinese in the Boxer Rebellion, and insurgents in the Philippines.

Charles B. Gatewood: Cavalryman, whose career was spent on the western frontier, fighting, commanding, or persuading Indians: he was the man to whom Geronimo surrendered.

Jacob G. Galbraith: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency; served the last ten years of his career as an inspector.

Cunliffe H. Murray: Thirty-nine years in the Cavalry: about half of them on the western frontier; two tours of duty in the Philippines.

Richard H. Wilson: Forty years in the Infantry, on the western frontier and in the Pacific Northwest; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Calvin Esterly: Resigned six years after graduating; grew citrus in California, was an executive of various educational and commercial concerns.

Edward Chynoweth: Thirty-two years in the Infantry: served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, fought insurgents in the Philippines in both of his tours of duty there.

Francis J. Patten: Twelve years in the Infantry; in civilian life, an inventor.

John H. Philbrick: Served on the western frontier and taught French for four years at the Military Academy; died fairly young. [+ AOG]

Henry J. Goldman: Thirty years in the Cavalry, almost all on the western frontier; but served in Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War and two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Wilber E. Wilder: Cavalryman. Fought Indians on the western frontier (Medal of Honor), and insurgents in the Philippines; served on the Mexican Punitive Expedition and in France in World War I.

Monroe P. Thorington: Infantryman, died a year after graduating. [+ AOG]

James V. S. Paddock: Thirteen years in the Infantry, entirely on the western frontier; retired for disability resulting from wound in fight with Indians.

Curtis B. Hoppin: Twenty-seven years in the Cavalry, almost all of it in the Far West; served in Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War, and in Cuba shortly afterwards.

James D. Mann: Thirteen years in the Cavalry on the western frontier; died of a wound received in combat with Indians.

Robert R. Stevens: Thirty-three years in the Army, most of it as a quartermaster; served on the western frontier and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Henry Kirby: Thirty-seven years in the Cavalry: almost all of on the western frontier, except for three tours of duty in the Philippines and one in Cuba.

Thomas H. Barry: Served on the western frontier, where he fought Indians; fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War; President of the Army War College; Superintendent of the Military Academy, 1910‑1912; commanded armies or army departments in Cuba, China, and Philippines; served in France in World War I.

John F. Guilfoyle: Forty years in the Cavalry, mostly on the western frontier, where he fought Indians.

William C. Brown: Forty-one years in the Cavalry: fought Indians on the western frontier, Adjutant of the Military Academy for five years, fought Spaniards in Cuba, insurgents in the Philippines, bandits in Mexico; served in France in World War I; helped draft regulations and Congressional bills; an inventor.

William T. Wood: Thirty-seven years in the Army: the first half in the Infantry mostly on the western frontier, the latter half in the Inspector-General's Department. Fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War, serving there on a second tour duty during the insurgency.

Robert E. Safford: Cavalryman, died on scout in Texas two years after graduating.

Charles J. Crane: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry: served on the western frontier, in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, in Puerto Rico, and two tours of duty in the Philippines, the first during the insurgency.

Harry T. Hammond: Resigned within the year; a lawyer in California, died young. [+ AOG]

John Bigelow: Cavalryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; Superintendent of Yosemite National Park; taught French at the Military Academy and also, after retiring from the Army, at MIT.

Ammon A. Augur: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served in the Philippines during the insurgency

George W. Baxter: Resigned four years after graduating: a rancher with political interests; served briefly as territorial governor of Wyoming.

Charles A. Bradley: Resigned within three years; a Colorado educator.

Henry O. Flipper: Dismissed from the Army five years after graduating. As a civilian, a translator and interpreter, especially of Mexican law; often working for the U. S. government, but also a civil and mining engineer on his own account.

John J. Brereton: Infantryman; served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines.

Oscar J. Brown: Twenty-nine years in the Cavalry, almost all of it on the western frontier; three years in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Robert T. Emmet: Fourteen years in the Cavalry, almost all of it on the western frontier, where he fought Indians (Medal of Honor).

Ben I. Butler: Resigned within a year, and died three years later.

John McMartin: Seventeen years in the Infantry, almost all of it on the western frontier; dismissed.

Robert D. Read: Thirty-seven years in the Cavalry, almost all of it on the western frontier, where he fought Indians; served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Samuel P. Wayman: Infantryman posted to Texas garrisons; died two years after graduating.

Edwin F. Glenn: Forty-two years in the Infantry: frontier duty in the West, exploring in Alaska, two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency, service in France in World War I.

Stephen C. Mills: Thirty-seven years in the Army: fought Indians on the western frontier, and served two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency; much of his career was in the Inspector General's Department.

George N. Chase: Fourteen years in the Infantry, most of it on the western frontier.

Millard F. Eggleston: Twelve years in the Cavalry, all on the western frontier; journalist, mining engineer, and politician in Oregon.

William H. Baldwin: Served fifteen years in the Cavalry on the western frontier; the last decade of his career was as a commissary on the west coast and in the Philippines, where he died. [+ AOG]

John Baxter: Thirty-eight years in the Army: the first ten, as an infantryman on the western frontier; later, a quartermaster.

Heber M. Creel: Five years in the Cavalry on the western frontier, and resigned. Wrote a dictionary and grammar of the Cheyenne language; businessman, farmer, North Dakota state senator and National Guard officer.

James B. Jackson: Thirty-five years in the Infantry: fought Indians on the western frontier and Spaniards in Cuba; served in Puerto Rico, the Philippines, and Cuba again.

Alexander M. Patch: Thirteen years in the Cavalry, all of them on the western frontier, where he fought Indians and others; but retired due to disability — amputation of a leg. Railroad executive.

George K. Hunter: Forty years in the Infantry, most of it on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; three tours of duty in the Philippines, the first two during the insurgency.

Daniel A. Frederick: Forty years in the Infantry, thirty of them on the western frontier; served in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Wallis O. Clark: Thirty-seven years in the Army, in the Cavalry and the Infantry, most of it on the western frontier. Fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; civil provincial governor in Cuba during the occupation; also served in Guatemala and Panama.

Matthias W. Day: Thirty-four years in the Cavalry, almost all of it on the western frontier, where he fought Indians (Medal of Honor); also served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in Cuba during the occupation.

Samuel H. Loder: Infantryman; died on the western frontier two years after graduating.

David N. McDonald: Resigned after ten years of scouting on the western frontier; a farmer in his home state of Tennessee.

James A. Maney: Thirty-four years in the Infantry, serving in occupied Cuba, in the Boxer Expedition, and fought insurgents in the Philippines. Notorious for having murdered a fellow officer.

John F. C. Hegewald: Resigned seven years after graduating; an executive of several companies in the leather, foundry, and construction industries. [+ AOG]

Ariosto McCrimmon: Resigned two years after graduation; worked in newspapers and real estate. [+ AOG]

F. Halverson French: Eight years in the Cavalry, then disappears entirely into civilian life.


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Page updated: 10 Feb 16