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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1879

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

Frederic V. Abbot: Forty years in the Corps of Engineers, much of it in harbor defense works; rose to Acting Chief of Engineers.

Thomas L. Casey: Thirty-three years in the Engineers; worked mostly on harbor fortifications in the Northeast and on Mississippi River improvements; after retiring from the Army, a noted entomologist.

Theodore A. Bingham: Twenty-five years in the Engineers, serving as military attaché in Berlin and Rome, and as aide to the President. After retiring from the Army, police commissioner of New York City.

Curtis McD. Townsend: Forty years in the Engineers. Much of his career was spent on Mississippi River improvements; served in France in World War I.

Gustav J. Fiebeger: Forty-two years in the Engineers; for a quarter of a century was Professor and Head of the Department of Civil and Military Engineering at the Military Academy.

William W. Gibson: Forty years in the Army, almost all in the Ordnance: inspector and arsenal commander.

Walter S. Alexander: Twenty-five years in the Artillery, mostly in coastal forts. No information at all on his civilian life after his resignation from the Army.

Frank S. Harlow: Artilleryman, served mostly in Eastern coastal forts, often in a teaching capacity, including six years at the Academy; career cut short by disability.

James E. Runcie: Fourteen years in the Army, four of which teaching at the Academy. As a civilian, practiced law in California and Cuba; Librarian of the Military Academy Library.

George H. G. Gale: Cavalryman, fought Indians in the Far West, and in the Philippines during the insurgency, much of his career being spent there.

William A. Shunk: Forty-three years in the Cavalry. Served the first half of his career on the western frontier and the Mexican border; two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency; often an instructor.

Francis H. French: Forty years in the Infantry. Served on the western frontier, in Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War, fought insurgents in the Philippines, served in France in World War I; his last post was as commander of the Philippine Department.

John M. Porter: Four years in the Cavalry, but dropped after going AWOL; an engineer for a few years in Central America.

Edmund D. Smith: Served most of his Army career on the western frontier; taught mathematics at the Military Academy for four years; fought insurgents in the Philippines, where he died of wounds on the battlefield.

Frederick S. Foltz: Forty-two years in the Cavalry, the first third of his career on the western frontier, and many years in Cuba where he was chief of police, of the secret service, or military governor. Also served in the Philippines and fought in France in World War I.

Luther S. Welborn: Cavalryman, retired for disability eleven years after graduating; briefly recalled to duty Stateside during World War I.

Lorenzo L. C. Brooks: Resigned four years after graduating; a Minnesota farm and bank executive.

Henry A. Greene: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry; served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; commanded the Philippine Department.

James O. Mackay: Twenty-one years in the Cavalry, almost all of it on the western frontier, where he fought Indians and Mexicans.

Frank Loring Dodds: Thirty-nine years in the Army, much of it as Judge Advocate, including several years in the Philippines during the insurgency; also served on the western frontier and in the Boxer expedition. [+ AOG]

Guy E. Huse: Cavalryman, resigned seven years after graduating; an officer in the Chilean army and an engineer on the Tehuantepec Railroad; died fairly young.

Edwin P. Pendleton: Thirty-four years in the Infantry, half of them on the western frontier; three tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

John A. Johnston: Cavalryman with a gift for organization. Organized musters, recruiting, and large ceremonial events, including several presidential inaugural parades. Fought in France in World War I.

William D. Beach: Forty-one years in the Cavalry; served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served in the Mexican punitive expedition, fought insurgents in the Philippines; wrote cavalry regulations, fought in France in World War I.

Archie Gibson: Cavalryman, died within two years of graduating.

Thomas Cruse: Cavalryman, served ten years on the western frontier, where he fought Indians (Medal of Honor); in charge of the supply of all mules and horses for the Spanish-American War in Cuba: after that his career was in the Quartermaster Corps.

Alfred McC. Ogle: Infantryman, served six years on the western frontier, but resigned after six years; coal company executive.

Charles R. Noyes: Forty-two years in the Infantry; served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, in China on the Boxer expedition, and in France in World War I.

Allen R. Jordan: Served on the western frontier, where he died suddenly, three years after graduating. [+ AOG]

Alonzo L. O'Brien: Cavalryman, served in the West; died of illness seven years after graduating.

Micah J. Jenkins: Cavalryman, resigned after seven years on the western frontier; in civilian life a Southern planter, he rejoined the Army briefly to serve in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

James A. Leyden: Infantryman, served in midwestern and western garrisons.

Charles H. Grierson: Thirty-six years in the Cavalry, almost all of it on the western frontier; served in Cuba during the occupation and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Lloyd M. Brett: Forty years in the Army, all except two years in the Cavalry, half of it on the western frontier where he fought Indians (Medal of Honor); served in the Philippines during the insurgency and in Cuba during the occupation; fought in France in World War I.

Charles M. Truitt: Thirty-six years in the Infantry; fought insurgents in the Philippines in two tours of duty.

Samuel C. Robertson: Fourteen years in the Cavalry, much of it in the field against Indians in the Pacific Northwest; resigned and died two months later.

Albert L. Mills: Fought Indians on the western frontier, and in Cuba in the Spanish-American War (Medal of Honor); Superintendent of the Military Academy, 1898‑1906.

Augustine F. Hewitt: Died in Texas three years after graduating.

James Lockett: Cavalryman, fought Indians in the West and insurgents in the Philippines.

Charles P. Stivers: Nine years as an infantryman on the western frontier, then thirteen years as a civilian, then rejoined the Army to serve in the commissary department, mostly in the Philippines.

Hunter Liggett: Infantryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; President of Army War College; in World War I, Chief of Staff in the final push to Allied victory: Marne, St. Mihiel, Argonne-Meuse.

John S. Parke: Thirty-six years in the Infantry, about half of it on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served three tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Thomas J. Lewis: Forty years in the Cavalry, almost all on the western frontier and in the Midwest; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; served in the Philippines.

Henry deH. Waite: Fifteen years in the Cavalry, mostly on the western frontier. His civilian career was as a California lawyer.

Walter L. Finley: Thirty-five years in the Cavalry; fought Indians on the western frontier, served in Cuba during the Spanish-American War, and three tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William B. Reynolds: Infantryman, retired for disability after twenty-eight years. Served mostly on the western frontier, but also in the Philippines during the insurgency and on the Boxer expedition.

Robert W. Dowdy: Infantryman, served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Christopher C. Miner: Twelve years in the Infantry on the western frontier, then court-martialed and dismissed. In civilian life, worked for the railroads.

James A. Irons: Infantryman, served nineteen years on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency; six years as military attaché to Japan.

Frank F. Eastman: Infantryman, served on the western frontier, in the Pacific Northwest, and in Philippines, fighting the Spanish in the Spanish-American War, then the insurgents; fought in the Boxer Rebellion; the last ten years of his forty-year career, a commissary in the Midwest.

Charles McClure: Infantryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and as judge advocate in Cuba; died commanding his post in Alaska.

Charles L. Steele: Infantryman, posted to various Western forts, served in the Philippine theater of the Spanish-American War.

Daniel L. Howell: Thirty-eight years in the Infantry; served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served two tours of duty in the Philippines, one of them during the insurgency.

Edward H. Browne: Twenty-nine years in the Infantry; fought Indians on the western frontier, served in the Philippines during the insurgency and again in a second tour of duty.

Benjamin W. Leavell: Twenty-eight years in the infantry, serving mostly on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency. His last eight years in the Army were on sick leave.

John S. Mallory: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry, serving the first half of his career on the western frontier; later, three tours of duty in the Philippines, where he fought insurgents.

Will T. May: Thirty-five years in the Infantry, much of it in the Upper Midwest and on the western frontier; also two tours of duty in the Philippines.

Samuel W. Miller: Forty-one years in the Infantry, much of it in the Pacific Northwest, where he fought Indians; served in the Philippines; a specialist in small arms and marksmanship.

Frank B. Jones: Thirty-eight years in the Infantry, the first half on the western frontier. Fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and fought insurgents in the Philippines in the first of his three tours of duty there; served on the Boxer Expedition.

Charles W. Taylor: Thirty-seven years in the Cavalry, the first half on the western frontier, where he fought Apaches and Sioux; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served two tours of duty in the Philippines.

Marion B. Saffold: Infantryman, served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines, where he was killed in action.

Percy Parker: Resigned three years after graduating; corporate executive of street railway and electrical supply companies, banks, etc.

Arthur C. Ducat: Thirty-three years in the Cavalry, the first half of it on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William E. Almy: Twenty-two years in the Cavalry, almost entirely on the western frontier, where he fought Indians; died in Puerto Rico during the occupation after the Spanish-American War.

Nathaniel J. Whitehead: Resigned three years after graduating: worked for several rubber manufacturers, grew fruit in Cuba. [+ AOG]

Walter A. Thurston: Twenty-six years in the infantry, the first half of it on the western frontier; three tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Guy R. Beardslee: Resigned a year after graduating, and operated an electric power plant in his hometown in rural New York State. [+ AOG]


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Page updated: 11 Feb 16