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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1880

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

Oberlin M. Carter: Engineer in river and harbor improvements, convicted of embezzling the government: was dismissed and served five years in prison.

George W. Goethals: Remembered as the Chief Engineer of the Panama Canal.

Sidney E. Stuart: Ordnance officer; taught four years at the Military Academy; killed in an industrial accident by the explosion of a shell.

William C. Rafferty: Thirty-nine years in the Coast Artillery; commanded the defenses of Galveston when it was struck by the Great Hurricane of 1900.

John L. Chamberlin: Forty-one years in the Army; rose to Inspector-General of the Army.

Charles S. Burt: Graduated but declined the Army appointment; mining engineer and owner of a metals processing firm.

Henry A. Schroeder: Resigned five years after graduating; an executive in the publishing business.

Charles J. Bailey: Forty-two years in the Coast Artillery; commanded the Philippine Department, fought in France as a division commander in World War I.

Frank H. Peck: Resigned upon graduation; a New York State attorney, served in the volunteers during the Spanish-American War.

Edward H. Catlin: Twenty-five years in the Artillery, serving in Cuba during the Occupation. New Hampshire State legislator.

Frederick S. Strong: Artilleryman, fought Indians on the western plains, taught at or superintended the Michigan Military Academy for nine years; served in the Philippines; Divisional commander in France in World War I.

Wilbur Loveridge: Artilleryman; twelve years of garrisons and training, then found dead in his quarters.

David J. Rumbough: Thirty-two years in the Artillery; fought insurgents in the Philippines.

Millard F. Harmon: Thirty-three years in the Artillery, almost all of his career spent in coastal forts. Served a tour of duty in the Philippines.

Charles H. Hunter: Thirty-seven years in the Artillery, in coastal forts; taught languages at the Military Academy six years; served in Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

George W. Van Deusen: Thirty-eight years in the Artillery, serving three tours of duty in the Philippines. [+ AOG]

Edgar Hubert: Infantryman, served mostly on the western frontier, but died on duty in Puerto Rico, of typhoid fever.

James B. Aleshire: Eighteen years on the western frontier, twenty-two years as a quartermaster; served in Cuba during the Occupation, in China in the Boxer Expedition, and in the Philippines during the insurgency; rose to Quartermaster-General of the Army.

Samuel W. Dunning: Thirty-three years in the Infantry: the first half on the western frontier. Fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Edward S. Avis: Infantryman, served almost all seventeen years on the western frontier; retired for disability and died not long afterward.

Warren H. Cowles: Infantryman, served seventeen years on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and served two Tours of duty in the Philippine Islands during the insurgency; retired for disability and died not long afterward.

James B. Erwin: Cavalryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency, in the Mexican Punitive Expedition, and in France in World War I.

Charles E. Hewitt: Resigned immediately; civil engineer and business executive. [+ AOG]

Hugh J. McGrath: Cavalryman; most of his career on the western frontier, but served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War and fought in the Philippines during the insurgency (Medal of Honor); died there of wounds received in action.

Elias Chandler: Twenty-six years in the Infantry: fought Indians on the western frontier; served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William S. Scott: Forty years in the Cavalry: fought Indians on the western frontier, served in the Spanish-American War, fought insurgents in the Philippines, commanded American ports in France in World War I.

Walter M. Dickinson: Eleven years in the Cavalry, during which he fought Indians on the western frontier, and seven in the Infantry; killed in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

George L. Converse: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier. Having lost an eye in combat, retired: taught military science for many years in his hometown.

Frederick D. Holton: Cavalryman; died ten years after graduating, his entire career having been spent in Pacific Northwest frontier garrisons.

Daniel L. Tate: Just short of forty years in the Cavalry, serving mostly on the western frontier, and three tours of duty in the Philippines, two of them during the insurgency.

Pierce M. B. Travis: Twenty-seven years in the Infantry; served on the western frontier, fought in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

George H. Morgan: Thirty-eight years in the Cavalry. Fought Indians on the western frontier (Medal of Honor), Spaniards in Cuba, insurgents in the Philippines.

Albert B. Scott: Twenty-five years in the Infantry, serving on the western frontier, and severely wounded in the assault of San Juan Hill in the Spanish-American War, forcing his retirement; died of those wounds shortly afterwards. [+ AOG]

J. Walker Benét: Forty years as an ordnance officer; commanded several arsenals; father of the poet Stephen Vincent Benét.

Benjamin S. Wever: Eleven years in the Infantry, almost all on the western frontier — then deserted: worked in mining in the Black Hills, then as a draftsman and engineer for the New York City government.

James S. Rogers: Thirty-six years in the Infantry, about half of them on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and served two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Henry B. Moon: Twenty-eight years in the Infantry, more than half of them on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

Harris L. Roberts: Thirty-six years in the Infantry, serving in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War, and two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

James R. Chapman: Resigned three years after graduating; lawyer and fruit grower.

John Y. F. Blake: Cavalryman, served nine years on the western frontier before resigning; led an Irish regiment against the British in the Boer War.

James H. G. Wilcox: Cavalryman, dismissed seven years after graduating; as a civilian, a municipal engineer.

Francis J. A. Darr: Resigned seven years after graduating; a coffee planter and American vice consul in Guatemala.

George Bell: Infantryman; twelve years on the western frontier, then fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served several years in the Philippines during the insurgency; high commands in Texas during the Mexican Punitive Expedition, fought in France in World War I.

Charles B. Vogdes: Twenty-three years in the Infantry, about half of them on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

George H. Sands: Thirty-six years in the Cavalry, fought Indians on the western frontier and Spaniards in Cuba; served two tours of duty in the Philippines.

Henry G. Sharpe: Forty years supplying the armies, including a tour of duty in Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War; rose to Commissary-General of Subsistence and Quartermaster General.

George W. Goode: thirty years in the CavalryOver thirty years in the Cavalry, mostly on the western frontier; acting superintendent of Yellowstone Park, also in charge of Apache prisoners in Oklahoma. Fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines.

Zerah W. Torrey: Infantryman, served half his career on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Charles Stewart: Resigned upon graduation; educator and banker. Served in the Army Transport Service in World War I. [+ AOG]

George R. Burnett: Cavalryman, served his entire eleven-year career on the western frontier where he fought Indians (Medal of Honor); taught military science; consul in Germany.

James W. Watson: Cavalryman; commanded Indian scouts, fought Apaches, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

Percy E. Trippe: Over thirty years in the Cavalry, about half of them on the western frontier; served in Cuba during the occupation and three tours of duty in the Philippines, where he fought insurgents.


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Page updated: 15 May 16