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Register of Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
Class of 1881

For a few words about Cullum's Register and the organization of the entries on this site, see the orientation page to the Register. The links below, to the individual entries, open in another window.

John Millis: Forty-one years in the Engineers: navigation, lighthouses, river and harbor works; but also in charge of the first electric illumination of the Statue of Liberty.

John Biddle: Engineer, fought in the Spanish-American War in Puerto Rico, Cuba and the Philippines, and headed the logistics of American troop movement from Britain to France in World War I; Superintendent of the Military Academy 1916‑1917.

Edward O. Brown: Resigned after a year; businessman and banker.

Harry F. Hodges: Forty years in the Engineers. Served in Puerto Rico immediately after the Spanish-American War; best known for his seven years working on the Panama Canal; in charge of training center for troops headed to France in World War I.

James G. Warren: Forty-one years in the Engineers, almost exclusively in river and harbor improvement; especially, building bridges often over the Ohio River, and in charge of the hydroelectric works at Niagara Falls.

Edwin St. J. Greble: Artilleryman, served on the western frontier, in Cuba during and after the Spanish-American War and again in the pacification campaign.

Williston Fish: Resigned six years after graduating, and worked in city railways in Chicago and the Pittsburgh area; a prolific writer of prose and verse, including Army and West Point stories both fact and fiction.

Samuel E. Allen: Thirty-eight years in the Artillery, mostly Coastal; by the end of his career, commanding important coastal defenses, Stateside and in the Philippines.

Daniel H. Boughton: Thirty-three years in the Cavalry; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and insurgents in the Philippines.

George T. Bartlett: Thirty-seven years in the Artillery, mostly coastal, rising to high departmental commands; served as a member of the Interallied Military Commission in Greece at the end of World War I.

Melzar C. Richards: Artilleryman; for twenty years taught military science, at several institutions.

Charles A. Bennett: Thirty-nine years in the Artillery; served in the Boxer Expedition and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Charles L. Phillips: Thirty-nine years in the Artillery, most of it in the Coastal Artillery; commanded important artillery districts.

Clarence P. Townsley: Over thirty-five years in the Artillery; commanded the Coast Artillery School; Superintendent of the Military Academy, 1912‑1916; served briefly in France in World War I.

Albert C. Blunt: Nearly thirty years in the Artillery, much of it in New York State; four years in Puerto Rico just after the Spanish-American War.

Joseph A. Gaston: Thirty-nine years in the Cavalry, serving on the western frontier, in Cuba during the occupation, and in the Philippines. Superintendent of relief camps in San Francisco after the 1906 earthquake.

Guy Carleton: Cavalryman, served fifteen years on the western frontier and briefly in occupied Cuba, fought insurgents in the Philippines, commanded a large mobilization center in World War I.

Francis J. Kernan: Infantryman. Fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War and served four tours of duty there, the last time commanding the Philippines Division; fought in France in World War I and was a prisoner exchange and peace negotiator at the end of the war.

Reuben B. Turner: Thirty years in the Army, for most of his career a constructing quartermaster, in charge of building a dozen posts in the West and South; served in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

John L. Barbour: Infantryman, served on the western frontier; taught military tactics.

Albert S. McNutt: Infantryman, served on the western frontier.

Rowland G. Hill: Infantryman, served and fought Indians on the western frontier; wrote works of military application.

Henry C. Hodges, Jr.: Infantryman, served fifteen years on the western frontier, fought insurgents in the Philippines, and served in France in World War I.

Franklin O. Johnson: Forty-one years in the Cavalry, the first quarter of his career on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and fought insurgents in the Philippines in two tours of duty.

Benjamin F. Handforth: Six years in the Infantry on the western frontier, then dismissed.

John F. Morrison: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in Philippines during the insurgency; fought in the Boxer Campaign in China.

Joseph T. Dickman: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier, insurgents in the Philippines; served in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the China relief expedition; commanded divisions in the final push to victory in World War I.

James T. Kerr: The first third of his Army career of forty-one years was spent on the western frontier, some of it fighting Indians; the last half of his career as an adjutant general. Fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and served two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

James H. Waters: Six years on the western frontier; resigned and was a real estate and lumber dealer in Minnesota.

Daniel E. McCarthy: Served in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, in the Philippines during the insurgency; Chief Quartermaster of various Departments, and Chief Quartermaster of the American Expeditionary Force in World War I.

Enoch H. Crowder: Served in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War; wrote the general election laws of Cuba where he was later ambassador; Judge Advocate General for twelve years; wrote the World War I draft law.

Charles H. Barth: Forty-one years in the Infantry, serving ten years on the western frontier; fought insurgents in the Philippines (and two later tours of duty there); and fought in France in World War I.

Albert J. Griffiths: Killed in an accident a year after graduating. [+ AOG]

Andrew G. Hammond: Cavalryman, stationed mostly on the western frontier; served in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

Frederick G. Hodgson: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier; Assistant Quartermaster-General.

Virgil J. Brumback: Infantryman, fought Indians on the western frontier; resigned twelve years after graduating and vanished into civilian life.

Lester W. Cornish: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

John C. Waterman: Cavalryman, fought Indians in the upper Midwest, served in Cuba.

Lyman Hall: Resigned upon graduation; professor of mathematics and president of a technical university.

Jonas A. Emery: Twenty-six years in the Infantry, serving on the western frontier, in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

John M. Stotsenburg: Served on the western frontier for fifteen years, and fought Indians; killed in action in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War.

Andrew S. Rowan: Military intelligence specialist, whose great moment came in the Spanish-American War: he was the man who carried the message to Garcia.

Parker W. West: Twenty-eight years in the Cavalry, serving most of his career on the western frontier; fought Mexicans on the Texas border, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; after his retirement, deputy governor of the United States Soldiers' Home for nearly a quarter century.

Britton Davis: Cavalryman, served five years on the western frontier before resigning; in civilian life, a mining executive.

Frank B. Andrus: Twenty-seven years in the Infantry, serving the first half on the western frontier; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and fought insurgents in two tours of duty in the Philippines.

Harry A. Leonhaeuser: Twenty-seven years in the Infantry, about half of them on the western frontier; fought insurgents in the Philippines. After retiring, changed his name to Harry Alex Lee.

Walter R. Stoll: Resigned four years after graduating and practiced law in Wyoming.

John H. Wills: Infantryman, served ten years on the western frontier, taught military science for four years, and died fairly young.

John H. Gardner: Thirty-seven years in the Cavalry, most of it on the western frontier; served in Cuba during the occupation, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Lyman W. V. Kennon: Thirty-seven years in the Infantry; served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and fought insurgents in the Philippines.

Simeon M. Dinkins: Resigned within a year and a half; practiced law and founded a school.

John B. McDonald: Forty years in the Cavalry, serving half his career on the western frontier; fought insurgents in the Philippines and Germans in France in World War I.

Frederick T. Van Liew: Eighteen years in the Infantry, including fighting in Cuba in the Spanish-American War. Dismissed; worked in insurance.


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Page updated: 4 Jul 16