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George W. Cullum's
Biographical Register of the Officers and Graduates
of the United States Military Academy
at West Point, New York, since its establishment in 1802

Cullum's Register is an index to all the graduates of the Military Academy at West Point, in sequential order, class by class, and within each class, in the final order of merit they achieved as cadets — or at least from 1818 to 1978, when the successor to the Register dropped the order of merit. Each entry consists of a detailed chronological summary of the graduate's official military career, and any synopsis of his civilian achievements that the editors managed to assemble; for later graduates, usually based at least in part on information supplied by the subject of the entry himself (for evidence of which, see entries 2710 and 2779). The overall numerical order of the entry of a graduate has come to be called his "Cullum number", and commonly serves as an identifier.

The Register was first conceived by Gen. George Washington Cullum (Class of 1833, ranking 3d in his Class; Superintendent of the Academy in 1864‑1866; his own Cullum number is 709). He started with a sort of draft version in 1850, then published it in its final form in a third edition, in three volumes, in 1891.

What even a few West Pointers may not know is that in the larger scheme of things, Cullum meant it to help in restoring unity to the Long Gray Line and the officer corps after the War between the States: the Register was closely connected with the establishment and promotion of the Association of Graduates, an organization that would become immensely successful and is now the quasi-official funnel or turntable for just about everything having to do with the Academy in the wider world, including the organizing and prioritizing of civilian financial donations to the Academy, public relations such as movies and books on West Point, etc.

Non-graduates are not listed, although many of them, especially in the first half of the 19c, went on to achieve signal success in various fields, including sometimes military careers. Somewhat similarly, though the civilian accomplishments of graduates are carefully reported, any military accomplishments on behalf of the Confederacy, no matter how great, are passed over with the mere mention that they "Joined in the Rebellion of 1861‑66 against the United States" (the war not having been declared over by President Johnson until August, 1866); from a historical standpoint, an obvious deficiency in the Register, if an understandable one.

After the summary of the graduate's military career, some entries include a biographical sketch, occasionally quite detailed if, as might be expected in a work of this kind, usually uncritical. Other entries, though no sketch is appended, refer to an obituary notice in the minutes of an Annual Reunion of the Association of Graduates; I've transcribed some of these as well, and they're linked both in the individual entries, and below under [+ AOG].

After Gen. Cullum's own 1891 edition, his Register continued to be published according to a somewhat awkward scheme of decennial supplements; today, with the advent of computers, an edition — properly no longer Cullum's Register but the West Point Alumni Foundation Register of Graduates — is published every year and available for purchase: see the AOG site. Now that about 900 cadets graduate every year — as many as in the entire first 35 years of the Academy's existence — 21c synopses are written in a very condensed shorthand abbreviating dates, ranks, units, campaigns, decorations and the like.

▸ And now that computers have become ubiquitous and disk space very cheap, there is no longer anything to be gained by such condensation: it is to be hoped that the Register will move back to a readable, unabbreviated form.

Class Rosters

I intend to carry this transcription thru the end of Volume III of the 3d (1891) edition of the Register, the last actually written by Gen. Cullum: that will take us to #3384, Class of 1890; in passing, this includes every graduate who fought, or could conceivably have fought, in the War between the States — all of whom are now onsite already.

Every graduate will eventually be listed under his Class. Currently, only the first 80 Classes (1802‑1882) are complete: the first 2,968 graduates, Vol. I complete (pp51‑748), Vol. II complete (pp1‑870), and pp1‑364 of Vol. III of the Register, plus some 1,324 pages in the Supplements. Graduates of later classes are listed individually below; as I keep on filling in further Class rosters, their graduates will be moved to them.

Now most of us won't know what Class an individual belonged to, so I've provided a general roster of graduates — only those actually onsite, and not to be found on the page before you — in alphabetical chunks. The greyed-out letter X is still empty: the first graduate whose last name began with X belonged to the Class of 1961.

A B C D E F G H
I J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W • X • Y Z

The brief summaries attached to the graduates' names are my own, not part of the Register, and sometimes indicate what my initial interest in the man was, usually in connection with another part of this site; and in fact many graduates mentioned on other pages of mine are still not among those whose entries I've managed to transcribe so far, so this is an ongoing project: the most recent addition was 4 Dec 16.

Complete class rosters onsite:

1810:
no graduates

1820:
Nos. 232‑261

1811:
Nos. 53‑71

1821:
Nos. 262‑285

1802:
Cullum Nos. 1‑2

1812:
Nos. 72‑89

1822:
Nos. 286‑325

1803:
Nos. 3‑5

1813:
No. 90

1823:
Nos. 326‑360

1804:
Nos. 6‑7

1814:
Nos. 91‑120

1824:
Nos. 361‑391

1805:
Nos. 8‑10

1815:
Nos. 121‑160

1825:
Nos. 392‑428

1806:
Nos. 11‑25

1816:
no graduates

1826:
Nos. 429‑469

1807:
Nos. 26‑30

1817:
Nos. 161‑179

1827:
Nos. 470‑507

1808:
Nos. 31‑45

1818:
Nos. 180‑202

1828:
Nos. 508‑540

1809:
Nos. 46‑52

1819:
Nos. 203‑231

1829:
Nos. 541‑586

1830:
Nos. 587‑628

1840:
Nos. 1017‑1058

1850:
Nos. 1450‑1493

1831:
Nos. 629‑661

1841:
Nos. 1059‑1110

1851:
Nos. 1494‑1535

1832:
Nos. 662‑706

1842:
Nos. 1111‑1166

1852:
Nos. 1536‑1578

1833:
Nos. 707‑749

1843:
Nos. 1167‑1205

1853:
Nos. 1579‑1630

1834:
Nos. 750‑785

1844:
Nos. 1206‑1230

1854:
Nos. 1631‑1676

1835:
Nos. 786‑841

1845:
Nos. 1231‑1271

1855:
Nos. 1677‑1710

1836:
Nos. 842‑890

1846:
Nos. 1272‑1330

1856:
Nos. 1711‑1759

1837:
Nos. 891‑940

1847:
Nos. 1331‑1368

1857:
Nos. 1760‑1797

1838:
Nos. 941‑985

1848:
Nos. 1369‑1406

1858:
Nos. 1798‑1824

1839:
Nos. 986‑1016

1849:
Nos. 1407‑1449

1859:
Nos. 1825‑1846

1860:
Nos. 1847‑1887

1870:
Nos. 2312‑2369

1880:
Nos. 2827‑2878

May 6, 1861:
Nos. 1888‑1932

1871:
Nos. 2370‑2410

1881:
Nos. 2879‑2931

June 24, 1861:
Nos. 1933‑1966

1862:
Nos. 1967‑1994

1872:
Nos. 2411‑2467

1863:
Nos. 1995‑2019

1873:
Nos. 2468‑2508

1864:
Nos. 2020‑2046

1874:
Nos. 2509‑2549

1865:
Nos. 2047‑2114

1875:
Nos. 2550‑2592

1866:
Nos. 2115‑2155

1876:
Nos. 2593‑2640

1867:
Nos. 2156‑2218

1877:
Nos. 2641‑2716

1868:
Nos. 2219‑2272

1878:
Nos. 2717‑2759

1869:
Nos. 2273‑2311

1879:
Nos. 2760‑2826

Graduates of later Classes:

George A. Zinn: Forty years as an Army engineer, mostly in river and harbor improvement; served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and fought in Mexico in the punitive expedition.

William C. Langfitt: Thirty-six years in the Engineers; chief engineer of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I.

Henry E. Waterman: Engineer; worked on river and harbors Stateside, but died fairly young.

William F. Hancock: Thirty years in the Artillery, serving on the western frontier, in Cuba immediately after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Henry C. Davis: Artilleryman, taught at the Military Academy and the Artillery School; much of his career in coastal artillery commands and liaising with the Navy.

Beverly W. Dunn: Ordnance officer; his military and civilian career, aggregating over fifty years, was spent in the inspection and regulation of the transportation of explosives and other dangerous articles.

Samuel D. Freeman: Twenty-six years in the Cavalry. Fought in the Spanish-American War; taught nine years at the Military Academy.

William F. Flynn: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier, in Cuba, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Robert J. Duff: Twenty-six years in the Cavalry; served in Cuba immediately after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Thomas Ridgway: Thirty-six years in the Artillery, stationed mostly to coastal forts; served briefly in China and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

John W. Ruckman: Artilleryman, served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, and later in the Philippines; best known as the author of technical books on artillery and works of military history and theory.

Alfred B. Jackson: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier and taught four years at the Military Academy, but died fairly young.

William P. Stone: Artilleryman, served on the western frontier and in the Philippines during the insurgency; about half his thirty‑year career was spent teaching military science.

William E. Shipp: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier; killed in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

Louis Ostheim: Artilleryman, stationed mostly in Eastern garrisons; fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War and the insurgency.

Charles G. Morton: Infantryman, fought insurgents in the Philippines, commanded U. S. troops in the Canal Zone, commanded a division in France in World War I.

William H. Smith: Cavalryman: fifteen years on the western frontier, then killed in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.

Isaac W. Littell: Most of his Army was spent in the Quartermaster Corps: he was the man in charge of building the Army camps raised in 1917 when the United States entered World War I.

George H. Cameron: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier, fought insurgents in the Philippines, and commanded a Corps in France in World War I.

John H. Shollenberger: Infantryman, served on the western frontier, mostly as quartermaster and commissary; served in Cuba shortly after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Charles H. Osgood: Posted to garrisons in New York State; died within three years of graduating.

Charles H. Cochran: Marksman, served on the western frontier; died nine years after graduating.

Elmore F. Taggart: Infantryman, served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and against insurgents in the Philippines, where he eventually retired and served as a municipal official.

George W. Read: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier, in Cuba and in the Philippines during the insurgency; commanded a Corps in France in World War I.

Frederick Perkins: Infantryman, served in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; also in the Philippines and in mostly western garrisons.

Omar Bundy: Infantryman, fought Indians on the western frontier, Spaniards in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, insurgents in the Philippines, and Germans in France in World War I.

Laurence D. Tyson: Served on the western frontier; resigned thirteen years after graduating, and was a manufacturing and banking executive and eventually a United States senator; he fought, however, in both the Spanish-American War and the First World War in France.

Clarence R. Edwards: Infantryman, fought insurgents in the Philippines, commanded American forces in the Panama Canal Zone, fought in France in World War I.

Irving Hale: Resigned after five years; an electrical engineer. Joined the Army again briefly to fight in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War; founded the first post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

James C. Sanford: Engineer whose forty‑year career was spent almost entirely in waterway navigation, in which he acquired an international reputation.

Hiram M. Chittenden: Twenty-five years as an Army engineer, in river works and the improvement of Yellowstone National Park; the author of multi-volume historical and geographical works.

Cassius E. Gillette: Engineer, whose twenty-year Army career was spent in river and harbor improvement; as a civilian, he continued to work as an engineer.

David DuBose Gaillard: In his nearly thirty years as an Army engineer, he served five years on the Mexican Boundary Commission, served in Cuba, and worked in river and harbor improvements; he is remembered for his six years completing the Culebra Cut of the Panama Canal.

Harry Taylor: Engineer, mostly of rivers and harbors; served in the Philippines and was Chief Engineer Officer in France in World War I; retired as Chief of Engineers.

William L. Sibert: Engineer, primarily of waterway and water-related projects; worked especially on the Panama Canal.

John Conklin: Field artilleryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Charles L. Corthell: Artilleryman, served in coastal garrisons, but died nine years after graduating.

Stephen M. Foote: Artilleryman; fought in the Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in France in World War I.

Isaac N. Lewis: Artilleryman, best known as the inventor, developer, and marketer of the Lewis machine gun. [+ AOG]

Wendell L. Simpson: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Farrand Sayre: Forty years in the Cavalry, almost always on the western frontier; served also in the Philippines and the Canal Zone. In his retirement, the author of books on Greek cynicism.

Wilds P. Richardson: Infantryman, served twenty years in Alaska and best known for the Richardson Road from Valdez to Fairbanks; served also on the American Expeditionary Force in northern Russia.

Grote Hutcheson: Cavalryman, fought Indians on the western frontier; fought in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War and in China in the Boxer Rebellion; commander of a large port of embarkation in World War I.

James K. Thompson: Infantryman, served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, taught at the Military Academy, and accompanied a congressional party on its fact-finding mission to the Philippines.

George O. Cress: Cavalryman; served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and on the Mexican Punitive Expedition; commanded the military prison at Fort Leavenworth.

Ernest S. Robins: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier; illness limited his career, and he died ten years after graduating.

David C. Shanks: Infantryman, served several tours of duty in the Philippines; commanded the principal Stateside port of embarkation of American troops in World War I.

Joseph E. Kuhn: Engineer. Taught five years at the Military Academy and later supervised construction of what is now Pershing Barracks; served in the Philippines during the insurgency; military attaché to Berlin during the early part of World War I; divisional commander in France at the end of the war.

Cornelis De W. Willcox: Taught many years at the Military Academy, fifteen of them as chair of the Modern Languages Department; served in the Philippines during the insurgency and in France in World War I.

Haydn S. Cole: As an infantryman, he fought Indians on the western frontier; retired for disability seven years after graduating, and was a lawyer and banker — but rejoined in active service in World War I, to manage military supply terminal facilities (Distinguished Service Medal).

Charles H. Muir: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry; served ten years on the western frontier, fought Spaniards in Cuba, insurgents in the Philippines, Germans in France.

John D. Barrette: Forty-one years in the Artillery, mostly the coastal branch; about a quarter of his career spent in teaching. Served briefly in the Philippines and, during World War I, in France.

Charles F. Parker: Artilleryman, who in his 20‑year career came to specialize in seacoast artillery and torpedoes; in the Spanish-American War, participated in a long and important two-man reconnaissance of Cuba behind the lines.

Robert A. Brown: Cavalryman, served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War and three tours of duty in the Philippine Islands during the insurgency; fought in France in World War I.

Almon L. Parmerter: Nearly thirty-five years in the Infantry; served three tours of duty in the Philippines, where he fought insurgents.

Willard A. Holbrook: Thirty-nine years in the Cavalry, ending his career as Chief of the Cavalry. Fought insurgents in the Philippines, served in the Mexican Punitive Expedition of 1916.

Frank De W. Ramsey: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, in the Philippines during the insurgency, and served in China in the Boxer Expedition.

John Little: Infantryman and commissary, served on the western frontier and in Puerto Rico; died fairly young, of typhoid.

Lewis M. Koehler: Cavalryman; fought Indians on the western frontier and insurgents in the Philippines; often an instructor of militia and civilians.

Robert L. Bullard: Infantryman: served on the western frontier, in the Philippines and Cuba, in Mexico; commanded the Second Army in France in World War I.

Edward R. Gilman: Resigned within three years; in civilian life, a business executive in various companies.

Charles D. Towsley: Served on the western frontier, but retired for disability within six years of graduating. Author and occasional professor of military science.

Henry C. Newcomer: Nearly forty years as an Army Engineer, mostly in river and harbor improvement.

Charles T. Menoher: Artilleryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency and fought in France in World War I. Best known for his tenure as Chief of the Army Air Service, made brief by his disagreements with his assistant, Gen. Billy Mitchell.

William H. Camp: Resigned three years after graduating; worked in government jobs in California.

John J. Pershing: Cavalryman; fought Indians on the western frontier, Spaniards in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, Moros in the Philippines, and bandits in the Mexican Expedition. Commanded the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I; General of the Armies.

Gustave W. S. Stevens: Artillery and signal officer, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Joseph C. Byron: Fought in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War, then many years as a quartermaster; in civilian life, contributed to supplying the war effort in World War I.

Harry G. Trout: Cavalryman, served in Cuba and the Philippines.

Edmund S. Wright: Thirty-four years in the Cavalry: served in Sioux campaign, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and served in the Philippines during the insurgency; most of his career spent on the western frontier.

Bertram T. Clayton: Much of his Army career was in the Quartermaster Corps. United States congressman. Killed in France in World War I.

Walter H. Gordon: Infantryman, served repeated tours of duty in the Philippines, including combat during the insurgency; division commander in France in World War I.

James L. Druien: Resigned after six years; farmer, livestock breeder and banker.

George B. Davis: Infantryman, soon specializing as a commissary; served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and as purchasing agent in the building of the Panama Canal.

Frederick C. Kimball: Infantryman, whose twelve-year career was cut short by an untimely death; he served half of it on the western frontier and half in the South.

Frank L. Winn: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, against insurgents in the Philippines, and in France as a division commander in World War I.

Charles C. Ballou: Infantryman, fought Indians on the western frontier and insurgents in the Philippines, served as a constructing quartermaster, trained colored officers, and fought in France in World War I.

Charles G. Dwyer: Infantryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in Alaska; in World War I, recalled from retirement to serve on court martial duty in New York.

Seward Mott: Cavalryman, killed by an Indian a few months after he graduated. [+ AOG]

Dwight Ely Holley: Thirty-four years in the Infantry, serving in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and three tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William G. Elliot: Infantryman, commanded Indian troops on the western frontier, and fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; died in hospital there shortly after the Spanish surrender.

Marcus Maxwell: Infantryman; served in an Indian campaign in the upper Midwest; resigned eight years after graduating: Arkansas lawyer and newspaper editor.

David W. Fulton: Infantryman; served on the western frontier, but died within three years of graduating. [+ AOG]

Edward C. Young: Resigned immediately; a business executive.

Richmond P. Davis: Forty-two years in the Artillery: taught twelve years at the Military Academy, commanded several of the most important coastal artillery posts.

Edgar Russel: Signal Officer: in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War; worked on Alaskan cable; Chief Signal Officer of the American Expeditionary Forces in France in World War I.

George F. Landers: Thirty-five years in the Artillery, commanded coastal defense posts and districts, including in the Panama Canal Zone.

George W. Gatchell: Thirty-two years in the Artillery: fought Indians on the western frontier; commanded various artillery posts and districts; fought in France in World War I.

Harry E. Wilkins: Thirty-two years in the Army, most of it in the Commissary and Quartermaster services; served in the Philippines during the insurgency and on the Veracruz Expedition of 1915, and in France in World War I.

Fremont P. Peck: Ordnance officer, killed eight years after graduating, by the bursting of a cannon.

Edson A. Lewis: Thirty-four years in the Infantry; four tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency; served in the Mexican Punitive Expedition, and in France in World War I.

Charles H. Martin: Forty years in the Infantry; served in the Philippines during the insurgency; fought in the Boxer Expedition and in France in World War I.

John D. Miley: Artilleryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and served in the Philippines during the insurgency, where he died.

William Weigel: Forty years in the Infantry; fought insurgents in the Philippines; Division commander in France in World War I.

John H. Alexander: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier; died seven years after graduating.

John A. Harman: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier and in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; on resigning, was a railroad engineer and executive in Ecuador.

Thomas W. Hall: Resigned a year and a half after graduating, although served three months during the Spanish-American War, when he fought in Cuba. Literary and dramatic author.

William E. Bruce: Infantryman, posted to frontier garrisons in the West, but died within five years of graduating.

Herman Hall: Thirty-five years in the Infantry; as a young officer, served in several strike control situations in the United States; in the course of sixteen years in the Philippines, rose to Chief of Philippine Constabulary. Fought in France in World War I.

Pierrepont Isham: Resigned within a year of graduating; a Chicago lawyer.

Arthur B. Foster: Infantryman, served in Puerto Rico immediately after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Marcus D. Cronin: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry. Served on frontier duty in the Pacific Northwest, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency; served in France in World War I.

Alexander L. Dade: Cavalryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and in Mexico against Pancho Villa's bandits; briefly in charge of Army aviation in World War I; resigned not long after.

Charles S. Farnsworth: Infantryman, fought Indians in the upper Midwest, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served in the Philippines during the insurgency, fought in France and Belgium in World War I, and ended his forty-one years in the Army as Chief of Infantry.

Charles Gerhardt: Infantryman, fought Indians in the upper Midwest, served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency, and fought in France in World War I.

Samuel Seay: Infantryman, served mostly in Western garrisons, and eight years in the Philippines during the insurgency, in two tours of duty.

William P. Baker: Resigned within two years after graduating. A civilian doctor and surgeon, with periods in the Army, however, including six years in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Eugene L. Loveridge: Dismissed eight years after graduating; an insurance agent in civilian life. Served briefly as a private during the Spanish-American War.

James T. Dean: Infantryman; served in Midwestern garrisons, in Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War and after, as well as in Cuba, the Philippines, the Pacific Northwest and Alaska; in France in World War I.

Michael J. Lenihan: Infantryman, served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency; brigade commander in France in World War I.

William H. Wassell: Resigned a few months after graduating, but rejoined three years later; served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Bard P. Schenck: Infantryman; retired nine years after graduating, his Army career having been spent almost all in North Dakota. Died four years later in South Africa. [+ AOG]

Henry R. Adams: Resigned a year after graduating; executive in a family manufacturing firm.

Henry Jervey: Engineer, often on river and harbor projects; worked on World War I mobilization plans.

Charles H. McKinstry: Thirty-five years as an Army engineer, especially in harbor defensive works; served in the Philippines, fought in France in World War I, worked in postwar peace negotiations and prisoner exchange.

William V. Judson: Engineer, mostly of river and harbor improvements; military attache to Russia during Russo-Japanese War and chief of military mission to Russia in 1917‑1918.

George W. Burr: Ordnance officer: served in the Philippines during the insurgency, commanded Rock Island Arsenal for seven years; after World War I, in charge of Ordnance Department liquidation and claims matters. [+ AOG]

Charles C. Gallup: Artilleryman; died nine years after graduating. [+ AOG]

John L. Hayden: Artilleryman, fought Sioux Indians in the Upper Midwest, served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and commanded forts in the Pacific Northwest for ten years.

Charles D. Palmer: Twelve years in the Army, of which four were as an instructor at the Military Academy; banking and industrial executive.

Peyton C. March: Forty-two years in the Artillery: fought insurgents in the Philippines and Germans in France in World War II as a top-level artillery commander; Chief of Staff of the Army.

Charles P. Russ: Infantryman, served on the western frontier; died in Puerto Rico shortly after the Spanish-American War, ten years after graduating.

Claiborne L. Foster: Died two years after graduating, on the western frontier at his first post.

Robert L. Howze: Cavalryman, fought Indians in the West (Medal of Honor); fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, fought insurgents in the Philippines, Mexicans in the punitive expedition; fought in France in World War I. Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy.

Edwin M. Suplee: Cavalryman, often detailed as paymaster; stationed in Western garrisons and served several tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Peter C. Harris: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and served in the Philippines during the insurgency and later; a skilled administrator who ended his career as Adjutant General of the Army.

Munroe McFarland : Thirty-four years in the Infantry; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in France in World War I.

William H. Wilhelm: Infantryman, killed in action in the Philippines during the insurgency. [+ AOG]

Charles V. Donaldson: Drowned two years after graduating, attempting to save a life, having already rescued two.

Eli A. Helmick: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served in the Philippines during the insurgency and in France in World War I; the last six years of his career, Inspector-General of the Army.

Alexander W. Perry: Cavalryman, fought Sioux in South Dakota and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

William T. Littebrant: Cavalryman, served on the western frontier, in Cuba, and in the Philippines; Superintendent of Yosemite National Park.

Albert M. D'Armit: Engineer; taught at the Military Academy, but died six years after graduating.

Francis W. Willcox: Resigned two years after graduating, and made a career in the new field of electric lighting.

Ben Johnson: Resigned immediately; construction engineer, worked on the Panama Canal and on the drainage of the Everglades.

William Lassiter: Artilleryman; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served three tours of duty in the Philippines, participated in the 1914 occupation of Veracruz; high-level commander in France in World War I.

William G. Haan: Artilleryman, fought insurgents in the Philippines; commanded a corps in France in World War I.

Alvin H. Sydenham: Served in the Cavalry and the Artillery, fought Indians on the western frontier; died four years after graduating.

Charles D. Rhodes: Forty years in the Cavalry, fighting in the last Sioux campaign, in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, against insurgents in the Philippines, and in France in World War I; lecturer, writer, and editor on mostly cavalry-related subjects.

Harry Raymond Lee: Thirty-three years in the Infantry; fought insurgents in the Philippines, served in Cuba; served in France during World War I.

George T. Langhorne: Forty-two years in the Cavalry, over a third of them in the Philippines; also served on the Mexican border and in quasi-diplomatic posts in Europe and Japan.

Ulysses G. Kemp: Cavalryman; fought Indians in the West and died nine years after graduating, at a Western frontier post.

Sydney A. Cloman: Infantryman, fought Indians on the western frontier, and fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War; served in various capacities in Venezuela, Colombia, Panama, Manchuria, England, Turkey, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Australia, New Zealand, and Malaysia; fought in France in World War I.

Charles Crawford: Thirty years in the Infantry: served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in France in World War I.

William S. Graves: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry, about half of it on the western frontier; fought insurgents in the Philippines for several years; commanded American expeditionary forces in Siberia at the end of World War I.

Frank D. Webster: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry: fought insurgents in the Philippines, served in France in World War I.

Joseph D. Leitch: Thirty-eight years in the Infantry: served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served in the Philippines and on the Siberian expedition.

Charles Young: Cavalryman; fought in the Philippines during the insurrection, served as military attaché in Haiti and Liberia.

Edgar Jadwin: Engineer, served in Cuba immediately after the Spanish-American War; best known for directing large construction and supply programs in France in World War I; retired as Chief of Engineers.

Charles S. Bromwell: Engineer; for five years, was military aide to the President.

Colden L'H. Ruggles: Forty years as an Ordnance officer; responsible for the successful establishment of Aberdeen Proving Ground.

Maurice G. Krayenbuhl: Artilleryman, fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War, and was killed in action against insurgents there, nine years after graduating.

Daniel W. Ketcham: Thirty-two years in the Coast Artillery; served in the Philippines and in France in World War I.

Milton F. Davis: Cavalryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and fought insurgents in the Philippines; in civilian life, ran a military school. Recalled to the Army in World War I, and trained aviators.

Fred W. Sladen: Infantryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency, fought in France in World War I, Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy; and later, Superintendent.

Henry G. Learnard: Infantryman, served in the Pacific Northwest, and in the Philippines during the insurgency; fought in the Boxer Rebellion.

James Madison Andrews: Fought Indians in the Upper Midwest; resigned two years after graduating and worked as an electrical engineer; mustered into the Army in World War I, and fought in France and Belgium. [+ AOG]

John Stephen Sewell: Engineer: especially, construction engineer of important government buildings in Washington, and in charge of all construction in a French sector in World War I; resigned and was president of a marble quarrying company.

Charles P. Echols: His forty years' Army career was almost entirely spent teaching mathematics at the Military Academy, two-thirds of it as full Professor and Head of the Department.

Louis Charles Scherer: Thirty-seven years in the Cavalry: served mostly on the western frontier, with two tours of duty in the Philippines and service in France shortly after World War I.

Edwin B. Winans, Jr.: Cavalryman, served six years on the western frontier; served in the Philippines during the insurgency and in the Boxer Expedition; in the Mexican Punitive Expedition; fought in France in World War I; Superintendent of the Military Academy, 1927‑1928.

William T. Johnston: Thirty-eight years in the Cavalry; fought insurgents in the Philippines, was in charge of all line officer training camps in World War I. [+ AOG]

William H. Osborne: Cavalryman, died seven years after graduating, on his return from fighting in Cuba in the Spanish-American War. [+ AOG]

William J. Glasgow: Thirty-five years in the Cavalry: served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in the Mexican Punitive Expedition.

Albert B. Donworth: Infantryman, resigned eight years after graduating, to become a lawyer; most of his Army career was in the Pacific Northwest.

John L. Hines: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in France in World War I, ending the war as corps commander; Chief of Staff of the Army.

Guy H. B. Smith: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency; dismissed after twenty years in the Army, with no trace of his subsequent life.

Alfred W. Drew: Infantryman, killed in action in the Philippines during the insurgency, eight years after graduating.

Hanson E. Ely: Infantryman, commanded Philippine scouts during the insurgency, served in the Vera Cruz expedition, and was divisional commander in France in World War I.

Lewis Stone Sorley: Infantryman, served on the western frontier, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency; historical researcher and author.

William R. Smith: Artilleryman. In his early career, taught ten years at the Military Academy. Commanded various large artillery units, including in France in World War I; served a year in the Philippines; Superintendent of the Military Academy, 1928‑1932.

Louis Ray Burgess: Artilleryman, fought insurgents in the Philippines, fought in China in the Boxer Rebellion, and in France in World War I; towards the end of his career, commanded coastal defenses of New York.

Charles P. Summerall: Artilleryman, fought insurgents in the Philippines, and fought in the Boxer Rebellion in China and in France in World War I; Chief of Staff of the Army.

John H. Parker: Thirty-two years in the Infantry, primarily as a machine gun expert. Fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and in France in World War I, where he was awarded four Distinguished Service Crosses.

William W. Haney: Infantryman. Retired for disability three years after graduating, and died two years later.

Dennis M. Michie: Infantryman, killed in Cuba in the Spanish-American War within six years of graduating.

Horace G. Hambright: Infantryman, died within four years of graduating.

George H. McManus: Artilleryman; fought in the Boxer Rebellion and served in the Philippines during the insurgency; troop movement officer at a large port of embarkation in World War I.

David M. King: Ordnance officer; half his career was spent at Rock Island Arsenal, ten years commanding it. [+ AOG]

Lincoln C. Andrews: Twenty-six years in the Cavalry; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; expert and author in the field of training civilians for military service; Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.

Samuel C. Hazzard: Artilleryman; went AWOL within seven years of graduating, and was dismissed: no further trace of him.

Walter C. Babcock: Topographical engineer, constructed the Trans-Alaska Road, fought in France in World War I.

Buell B. Bassette: Resigned at the end of his graduation leave; miscellaneous pursuits and activism in civilian life.

Edward B. Cassatt: Cavalryman; fought in Cuba and Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War; military attaché in London.

Edward E. Hartwick: Ten years in the Cavalry; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War. Eighteen years a civilian, as a lumber company executive; called up in World War I, and died in France.

Edward Taylor: Fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; died in the Philippines six years after graduating.

Hamilton A. Smith: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, in the Philippines against insurgents, in France in World War I, where he was killed.

Clarence C. Williams: Ordnance officer. Fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War; Chief Ordnance Officer of the American Expeditionary Forces in France in World War I; Chief of Ordnance for twelve years. Long after his retirement, when he was in his seventies, was recalled for special duty during World War II.

James Marks Williams: Twenty-six years in the (Coast) Artillery; served in the Philippines and in France.

John Warren Joyes: Forty years as an ordnance officer, with important commands by the end of his career.

Edward Philip O'Hern: Forty years as an ordnance officer; fought in the Spanish-American War and World War I; commanded various arsenals.

Dwight E. Aultman: Artillerist; fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and stayed there for several years training the Cuban army; served in the Philippines, fought in France in World War I, commanded the Field Artillery School.

Butler Ames: Resigned immediately, although he fought as a volunteer in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War; Massachusetts State representative, then a United States Representative from that State.

William A. Sater: Infantryman, killed in the Spanish-American War four years after graduating.

George Henson Estes, Jr.: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served four tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency; was treasurer and quartermaster at the Military Academy.

Oliver Edwards: Twenty-six years in the Infantry; a machine gun specialist and instructor, served in the Philippines during the insurgency and fought in France in World War I.

Thomas W. Connell: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; killed by insurgents in the Philippines seven years after graduating.

John S. Battle: Infantryman, served in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War and afterwards; in Cuba; in the Philippines during the insurgency; fought in World War I in France.

Charles L. Bent: Thirteen years in the Infantry before resigning to become a railroad engineer; in that capacity served with the Army again in France in World War I.

Briant Harris Wells: Forty years in the Infantry: fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippine during the insurgency, serving several tours of duty there; fought in France in World War I; Deputy Chief of Staff of the Army.

John Asa Gurney: Infantryman, killed in the Spanish-American War three years after graduating.

Jens Bugge: Taught four years at the Military Academy, served in the Philippines and in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, as well as in Europe in World War I; Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy.

Casper H. Conrad, Jr.: Forty-one years in the Army: served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in occupied Germany after World War I.

Harry E. Smith: Artilleryman: fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, resigned seven years after graduating, and died the next year.

Harry Howard Stout: Served in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and taught briefly at the Military Academy, but resigned six years after graduating; a consulting engineer and corporate executive with several materials firms.

Conway H. Arnold, Jr.: Artilleryman, served in various garrisons and in Cuba; retired for illness and died young shortly afterward.

Brooke Payne: Artilleryman, fought in Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War, served on the Mexican border and in the Philippines, and fought in France in World War I.

Morton Fitz Smith: Infantryman. Fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency; taught infantry tactics at the Military Academy; died relatively young while Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy.

Louis H. Lewis: Infantryman, killed in the Spanish-American War three years after graduating.

David S. Stanley: Twenty-seven years in the Army, almost all as a quartermaster; serving in the Philippines during the insurgency and in France during World War I.

Benjamin T. Simmons: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Joseph Numa Augustin: Infantryman, killed in the Spanish-American War three years after graduating.

Samuel George Creden: Infantryman, died a few months after graduating.

Anton Springer, Jr.: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and against insurgents in the Philippines, where he was killed six years after graduating. [+ AOG]

William S. Guignard: Artilleryman, fought in Puerto Rico in the Spanish-American War and served in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Joseph Powell Tracy: Forty-two years in the Artillery. Served in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency; chief of staff of the Panama Canal and Philippine Divisions, various other high-level commands.

John Morrison, Jr.: Cavalryman, killed in action in the Philippines four years after graduating.

Elvin R. Heiberg: Cavalryman, served in Puerto Rico during the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines during the insurgency; died on the Italian front in World War I, while an observer.

Merch B. Stewart: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and fought in France in World War I. Much of his career was spent in officer training — ending as Commandant of Cadets, then Superintendent, of the Military Academy.

Charles E. Russell: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; died in the Philippines six years after graduating.

Dennis E. Nolan: Fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, served in the Philippines during the insurgency, fought in France in World War I; administered the intelligence section of the General Staff of the American Expeditionary Forces.

Duncan N. Hood: Resigned immediately, although he volunteered for the Spanish-American War, and served in Cuba immediately afterward. Representative of a publishing house in South America, but then disappears from the record.

Charles Trumbull Boyd: Cavalryman, spent much of his career fighting in the Philippines; killed in a Mexican border war expedition.

William D. Connor: Engineer and logistics expert; fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War, and in France in World War I; commanded the repatriation of troops from France after the war. Commandant of the Army War College; Superintendent of the Military Academy, 1932‑1938.

John C. Oakes: Engineer, often of river and harbor works; served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and fought in France in World War I.

Louis Casper Wolf: Engineer, worked mostly on the defenses of San Francisco; died six years after graduating.

Henry Sims Morgan: Died a month after graduating, in an attempt to rescue victims of a shipwreck.

Sherwood A. Cheney: Engineer, served in the Philippines during the insurgency and in France in World War I, from where he directed the repatriation of American troops; commanded the Engineer School.

Frederick W. Altstaetter: Engineer, mostly of harbor works; fought insurgents in the Philippines and made prisoner by them.

Harley B. Ferguson: Engineer, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and in the Boxer Rebellion campaign; served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and fought in France in World War I; after the war, planned industrial mobilization.

John K. Moore: Infantryman, served in Cuba during the occupation, in the Boxer Expedition, and in the Philippines during the insurgency; died fairly young.

Bertram C. Gilbert: Served in Cuba during the occupation, taught four years at the Military Academy, but was retired under a cloud. As a civilian, he was for fifteen years in charge of the sales records of Marshall Field Co. (a large Chicago department store).

Lawrence S. Miller: Twenty-three years in the Artillery; two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency; much of his career was as a quartermaster.

George E. Mitchell: Twenty-three years in the Cavalry; served in the Philippines during the insurgency and in France in World War I.

Frank Ross McCoy: Cavalryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, against insurgents in the Philippines, and in World War I. Served as trouble-shooting diplomat in Japan, China, Nicaragua, and Armenia.

Henry Abbot: Infantryman; died a year and a half after graduating.

Frederick A. Pearce: Served in the Philippines during the insurgency, but died two years after graduating.

Charles H. Munton: Fought in the Philippines in the Spanish-American War, then against insurgents there. Died within two years of his graduation.

Fox Conner: Artilleryman; in the course of his 40‑year Army career he rose to corps area commander. In World War I served as Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations, with marked success.

Edmund N. Benchley: Infantryman, killed in Cuba in the Spanish-American War two months after graduating.

Malin Craig: Forty-one years in the Cavalry: fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War and in the Boxer campaign; served in the Philippines during the insurgency; fought in France in World War I; Director of the Army War College, Commandant of the Cavalry School, commanded Panama Canal Department; Chief of Staff of the Army.

Clarke Churchman: Infantryman, killed fighting in Cuba in the Spanish-American War two months after graduating.

William L. Murphy: Infantryman, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War, and was killed fighting in the Philippines during the insurgency, two years after graduating.

Edward M. Markham: Forty years as an Army engineer: served in the Philippines and Cuba, and in France during World War I; Chief of Engineers.

Alfred B. Putnam: Engineer, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; brief mission to the Panama Canal Zone; died fairly young.

Herman W. Schull: Ordnance officer, fought in Cuba in the Spanish-American War; commanded various arsenals,

George S. Simonds: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry; fought in the Philippines during the insurgency; several tours of duty at the Military Academy; served in France in World War I.

Llewellyn N. Bushfield: Fought insurgents in the Philippines; dismissed four years after graduating; no further information until his death at 59.

Stanley D. Embick: Artilleryman, forty-six years in the Army, much of it in higher staff and war planning positions; attached to Versailles Peace Commission after World War I; in World War II, chaired the Inter-American Defense Board, and was a member of the American delegation to the conferences that led to the foundation of the United Nations.

Halsey E. Yates: Infantryman, served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War and in the Philippines during the insurgency; his later career was with constabularies, reserves, and disaster relief.

Clement A. Trott: Forty-two years in the Infantry; served in the Philippines during the insurgency, taught law at the Military Academy, served on the Mexican Punitive Expedition and in France in World War I.

George V. H. Moseley: Fought in the Philippines during the insurgency and in France in World War I; best known for an incident on the Mexican border in 1929 and for his unfortunate speaking campaigns and writings after his retirement.

Charles C. Farmer, Jr.: Served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in France in World War I.

Wilson B. Burtt: Thirty-nine years in the Infantry: served in Cuba just after the Spanish-American War, three tours of duty in the Philippines, of which one during the insurgency; fought in France in World War I.

Walter S. Brown: Infantryman, served on the Pacific coast, taught military science at the University of Maine.

Stuart Heintzelman: Thirty-six years in the Cavalry; served several tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency, fought in the Boxer Campaign, fought in France in World War I; commanded the Command and General Staff School for six years.

George D. Jarrett: Infantryman, served four years in the Philippines during the insurgent; died a year later, five years after graduating.

Lawrence D.Cabell: Nearly thirty years in the Army, much of it as a quartermaster; served in the Mexican Punitive Expedition and in France in World War I.

James Justice: Nearly thirty years in the Infantry; served two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency.

Ephraim G. Peyton: Infantryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and fought in France in World War I.

Charles R. Lawson: Artilleryman; taught languages at the Military Academy; ded ten years after graduating.

Clarence Deems, Jr.: Twenty-nine years in the Artillery, about half of them spent as an instructor; fought in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in France in World War I.

Ernest E. Allen: Served in the Philippines during the insurgency; died within two years of graduating.

Lewis S. Morey: Thirty-nine years in the Army, primarily in administrative and financial posts. Fought in Mexico in the Punitive Expedition of 1916.

Ernest D. Peek: An Army Engineer for forty-one years. Fought insurgents in the Philippines, and fought in France in World War I, organizing and conducting railway operations at the front; much of the rest of his career was in river and harbor improvement.

Walter H. Lee: Engineer, killed in action in the Philippines four months after graduating. [+ AOG]

Fred L. Deen: Cavalryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; died three years after graduating.

Samuel W. Robertson: Served in the Philippines during the insurgency; died four years after graduating.

Herbert C. Krumm: Cavalryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; died Stateside within four years of graduating.

Douglas MacArthur: A forty-eight-year Army career: twelve years in the Engineers and the remainder as an infantry commander. Much of his career was involved with the Philippines, but he also fought in France in World War I. Supreme Commander in the Pacific during World War II, Supreme Allied Commander in occupied Japan, United Nations Commander in the Korean War until dismissed by the President of the United States; General of the Army.

Thomas F. Van Natta: Cavalryman, fought in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in Mexico; military attaché in Cuba and in Spain.

Thomas E. Selfridge: Artilleryman, the first American military aviator to be killed in a plane crash, five years after graduating.

Reynolds J. Powers: Cavalryman, served two tours of duty in the Philippines during the insurgency, where he died nine years after graduating.

Henry H. Robert: Engineer, served in the Philippines and the Pacific Northwest; died young.

Roger Derby Black: Seventeen years in the Army Engineers, with varied duties, among which as topographical officer in the Philippines and in engineering administration in Europe in World War I. In civilian life, conducted similarly varied projects for state and federal governments.

Theodore H. Dillon: Engineer, fought in France in World War I; in civilian life, taught at MIT and Harvard.

Lesley J. McNair: Artilleryman; fought in the Mexican Punitive Expedition and in France and World War I; in World War II, fought in North Africa and in France, where, as Commanding General, Army Ground Forces, he was killed in action.

Robert C. Richardson, Jr.: Cavalryman, forty years in the Army, during which he fought Moros in the Philippines, served as an aide and administrator in France in World War I, was Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy for four years, and commanding general of various units in the Pacific theater in World War II.

Robert Melville Danford: Thirty-seven years in the Field Artillery; served in the Philippines during the insurgency and in France immediately after World War I; Commandant of Cadets at the Military Academy.

James Brownrigg Dillard: Fifteen years in the Artillery and Ordnance; after his resignation from the Army, an executive in a machine tools company.

Leo P. Quinn: Eighteen years in the Field Artillery, fought in France in World War I.

Carroll A. Neal: Sixteen years in the Artillery, served in the Philippines, then in France in World War I.

Wilber A. Blain: Infantryman, served several tours of duty in the Philippines and served in France in World War I.

Riley E. Scott: Served in the Philippines during the insurgency, but resigned three years after graduating, and vanished into civilian life.

Henry R. Adair: Cavalryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; killed in a Mexican border war expedition.

Bernard P. Oswalt: Infantryman, died in the Philippines four years after graduating.

John J. Moller: Infantryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; died within five years of graduating.

Calvin P. Titus: Infantryman, served in the Philippines, in the Mexican Punitive Expedition, and in Germany in the Army of Occupation. Before entering the Military Academy, he fought in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in China in the Boxer Rebellion (Medal of Honor).

Philip J. R. Kiehl: Cavalryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency; taught languages four years at the Military Academy; ended his forty-year Army career in the Ordnance, commanding various arsenals.

Frederick T. Dickman: Cavalryman, served in the Philippines and on the Mexican Punitive Expedition; transferred to aviation and was killed in a flight accident.

Roy B. Staver: Resigned three years after graduating; as a civilian, active in the National Guard, and died young while training civilian World War I volunteers.

William A. Ganoe: Infantryman, military historian; taught at the Military Academy and at Boston University; among his books, The History of the United States Army.

Charles D. Rogers: Cavalryman, died in the Philippines seven years after graduating.

Ellwood S. Hand: Dismissed from the Army six years after graduating, died the following year as a civilian worker in Panama.

Thomas J. Smith: Thirty years in Artillery and Ordnance; brief tours of duty in Panama and the Philippines; commanded several large arsenals.

James Eugene Chaney: Early in his long career, he became a military aviator; in World War II, commander of Army forces in Britain, and later, of all U. S. forces on Iwo Jima.

James H. Cunningham: Thirty-seven years in the Coast Artillery; fought in France in World War I, and in World War II commanded the harbor defenses of Puget Sound.

Edwin V. SumnerJr: Cavalryman, served in the Philippines during the insurgency, and in France in World War I, where he commanded a large aviation production and assembly center.

Arthur Edward Bouton: Infantryman, served in the Philippines; killed in action in France in World War I.

Frank S. Besson: Engineer, fought in France in World War I; trained engineers.

Lindsay C. Herkness: Engineer, served in the Philippines, fought in France in World War I; resigned ten years after graduating and was a manufacturing executive.

Clarence E. Partridge: Nearly forty years in Ordnance; served in the Philippines, and fought in World War I; commanded several large arsenals.

George S. Patton, Jr.: The commander of the 1st and 7th Armies in Europe in World War II.

Henry H. Malven, Jr.: Seventeen years in the Coast Artillery, then eleven in the Adjutant-General's Department; served in France in World War I; two tours of duty in the Philippines.

James Garesché Ord: Thirty-six years in the Infantry; fought in France in World War I; served in the Philippines; Chairman of the Joint Brazil-United States Defense Commission in World War II.

Guy W. McClelland: Cavalryman, served in the Philippines, fought in World War I in France, where he died suddenly, shortly after the war. [+ AOG]

Legrand B. Curtis: Coast Artillery, died three years after graduating.

Herbert O'Leary: Thirty-four years in the Coast Artillery and Ordnance; commanded ordnance depots, including in the Panama Canal Zone.

Walter B. Robb: Resigned four years after graduating, although he served briefly, Stateside, in World War I; a warehouse executive.

Joseph E. Carberry: Military aviation pioneer, retired for disability fifteen years after graduating.

Harold F. Nichols: Forty years in the Coast Artillery; served in France in World War I and in Hawaii in World War II.

John P. Lucas: Artilleryman. Served in the Philippines, on Mexican Punitive Expedition, fought in France in World War I, and in Europe in World War II.

Kenneth E. Kern: Infantryman, served in the Philippines and fought in France in World War I.

Robert C. Gildart: Artilleryman, served just after World War I in France then in Germany, where he died eight years after graduating.

Lewis A. Nickerson: Forty years as an ordnance officer.

William Dean: Infantryman, served in the Philippines; died six years after graduating.

George Fenn Lewis: Engineer, served on the Mexican Punitive Expedition; resigned within five years of graduating and was a manufacturing company executive.

Roy Melvin Smyth: Infantryman, killed in France in World War I four years after graduating.

La Rhett L. Stuart: Thirty-seven years in the Coast Artillery, including a year fighting in New Guinea and the Philippines in World War II.

John W. Butts: Aviator, killed in the crash of his plane within five years of graduating. [+ AOG]

John S. Bragdon: Engineer; served in France in World War I; a specialist in camouflage.

John Scott Smylie: Twenty-eight years in the Engineers; much of his career was as an inspector general or an instructor, including at the Academy.

William S. T. Halcomb: Fought in France in World War I, and resigned after the war, three years after graduating.

James A. Van Fleet: Infantryman; fought in France in World War I, coached football as part of his official duties, taught military science for eight years, served in Europe in World War II and in Greece after the war.

Herbert R. Corbin: Artilleryman, served eight days in the Philippines, and three months fighting in France in World War I; died Stateside three years after graduating.

Harry B. Anderson: Aviator, served in France in World War I; killed in a plane accident in Germany within four years of graduating.

John Howard Wills: Engineer, killed in action in France in World War I, two years after graduating.

Francis E. Dougherty: Infantryman, killed in action in France in the World War I, a year after graduating.

Oliver B. Cardwell: Artilleryman, fought in France in World War I; died Stateside not long after the war, four years after graduating.

William O. Butler: Fought in France in World War I as a balloon observer; in World War II, he commanded the Army Air Force in Alaska and was deputy commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force in Europe.

Charles D. Harris: Engineer, killed in action in France in the World War I, a year after graduating.

Josephus B. Wilson: Infantryman, killed in action in France a year after graduating.

Frank Sidney Long: Infantryman, killed in action in France a year after graduating.

Roland Mac Gray: Artilleryman, killed by an enlisted man a year after graduating.

William C. Coogan: Infantryman, served in Siberia, but resigned three years after graduating; in civilian life, a building contractor.

Albert Francis Ward: Infantryman, killed in action in Siberia a year after graduating. [+ AOG]

James L. Rhoads: Engineer; honorably discharged four years after graduating, and died shortly afterwards.

John H. Elleman: Resigned five years after graduating; a chemical and structural engineer. Served in the Army as an engineer, Stateside, in World War II.

Robert G. Lovett: Thirty-six years as an Army Engineer, fought in World War II in Europe.

Anthony C. McAuliffe: In 1920, learning Artillery. [He would become the commanding general of the American forces at the Battle of the Bulge.]

Carlisle V. Allen: Infantry officer with a Master's in English Literature; taught and wrote books as part of his official duties. Served in the Philippines, and fought in World War II in Europe.

Douglas A. Olcott: Artilleryman, died three years after graduating.

George D. Rogers: Ordnance officer; in World War II, served in Algeria and Italy.

William McK. Laumeister: Infantryman, killed in a training accident a year after graduating.

William A. Burns, Jr.: Artilleryman, died two years after graduating, of a riding accident.

Oscar Louis Beal: Observation and bomber pilot.

Oliver W. Hughes: Infantryman, served Stateside during World War II, also as an advisor in postwar Greece.

Oren Wilcox Rynearson: Before becoming a cadet, had served as an enlisted man during World War I; retired for disability five years after graduating. A petroleum engineer, he died five years after that.

Lewis S. Kirkpatrick: Artilleryman, commanded coastal batteries in the United States and in the Philippines; died a prisoner of war at Corregidor.

Ronald M. Shaw: Cavalryman, served in the western States, taught several years at the Military Academy.

John Ignatius Brosnan: Cavalry officer, died of a riding accident a few months after graduating.

Joseph H. Gilbreth: Tank commander, served in the European Theater in World War II.

Keith Allen Thompson: Killed in a flying accident a year after graduating. [+ AOG]

Alfred Dodd Starbird: Engineer, fought in Europe in World War II, and in his later career developer of the American nuclear arsenal. Olympic pentathlon competitor at the 1936 Berlin Games.

John Douglas Matheson: Engineer; fought in Italy in World War II.

William Orlando Darby: In World War II, led the Rangers thru the landings in North Africa, in Sicily, at Salerno, and at Anzio; killed in action.

Frank James Carson, Jr.: Died a few days after taking his first post. [+ AOG]

Milton Frederick Summerfelt: Bomber pilot and wing commander during World War II; later, a policy planner for the General Staff.

Franklin Guest Smith: Artilleryman, fought in the Pacific in World War II.

William Henry Baumer, Jr.: Writer and public relations officer; worked in the war plans branch of the General Staff; wrote several books on West Point and Army themes.

Arthur B. Proctor: Artilleryman, died a year after graduating.

Harry John Harrison: Coastal Artillery; killed in action in Germany in World War II, nine years after graduating.

Carl Mosby Parks: Aviator, died in Panama four years after graduating.

Louis Edward Coira: Army Air Force officer, commanded bomber groups defending the Canal Zone in World War II.

Turner Mason Chambliss, Jr.: Killed in action in Normandy, on D‑Day, a year after graduating.

Alan Walter Jones, Jr.: Infantryman, fought in France and Germany in World War II; prisoner of war.

Kenneth Wendell Hughes: Infantryman, died in Corea five years after graduating.

Fernando Francis Birch: Entered civilian life on graduation, due to disability; a chemical engineer.

[decorative delimiter]

Technical Details

Editions Used, Copyright

This transcription follows the third edition (1891), the last edition of the original Register by Gen. Cullum; and subsequent editions as necessary.

Both the Association of Graduates and The Alumni Foundation are private organizations, not arms of the U. S. Government, and their publications benefit from the provisions of copyright law. That said, all editions thru 1921, i.e., thru the Vol. VI 1920 Supplement, are now in the public domain, the copyrights having expired; and the Vol. VII (1930), VIII (1940), and IX (1950) Supplements are also now in the public domain, their copyrights not having been renewed in 1957/1958, 1967/1968, and 1977/1978 as required by the law then in force. (Details here on the copyright law involved.)

Starting with Vol. VIII, space constraints forced the printed Supplements to depart progressively from the formatting of the original edition. Online, however, such constraints are for the most part inoperative, and I've retained the original format as much as possible.

Added Information

Cullum's Register is available elsewhere online thru 1910 in full, and parts of the 1920 edition are also available: all this as PDF files from photocopy images. The advantages then of the transcriptions before you are only that they are easier to read and search; much easier to link to and copy from; I make in them a very few corrections — the Register was fairly well proofread — and of course often enough also link them to further material, which the online PDF's cannot do.

I've also taken advantage of the Web though to make several kinds of additions to the text of the entries:

1. Photographs: usually some already widely available public-domain photograph of the officer himself, but occasionally my own photograph of his grave or some other relevant subject. The Register itself is unillustrated, except for a frontispiece of Gen. Cullum, which I've reproduced above his own entry, naturally.

2. Fuller names, place and date of birth, place of burial, where I trusted my sources; for grave sites, Find-a‑Grave, though uneven and sometimes inaccurate, has been very helpful when documenting the location with a photograph of the headstone. Though I formatted them in the style of the printed edition, they remain my own additions, so I distinguish them on the page by a darker shade of gold:

Died . . . (text from the Register)

Buried . . . (my addition)

3. My own annotations, often because the officer had a career in the Confederate army, about which the Register is (almost) always silent; or because I have some significant material on him elsewhere onsite: to which I provide the appropriate links, of course.

I've also folded in information from subsequent editions: thus, for Gen. Cullum himself, the bulk of the entry is from the 3rd edition, but the particulars of his death are from a later edition. Again, these additions are clearly marked as well.

I am indebted to several people for correcting transcription errors of my own; and in particular to Steven Maes for continuing help (yeoman's work is more like it) — mostly alerting me to additional sources of information that I overlooked.

Proofreading

This transcription has been minutely proofread. In the table of contents above, the entries are shown on blue backgrounds, indicating that I believe the text of them to be completely errorfree. As elsewhere onsite, the header bar at the top of each chapter's webpage will remind you with the same color scheme.

The Register was very well proofread, and the inevitable errors are few and minor. I fixed them by marking the correction each time, when important, with a bullet like this;º and when trivial, with a dotted underscore like this: as elsewhere on my site, glide your cursor over the bullet or the underscored words to read the variant. Similarly, bullets before measurements provide conversions to metric, e.g., 10 miles. A small number of odd spellings, curious turns of phrase, split infinitives, etc. have been marked <!-- sic --> in the sourcecode, just to confirm that they were checked.

Any other mistakes, please drop me a line, of course: especially if you have a copy of the printed book in front of you.

Pagination and Local Links

For citation and indexing purposes, the pagination is shown in the left margin of the text at the page turns (like at the beginning of this linep57); these are also local anchors. Sticklers for total accuracy will of course find the anchor at its exact place in the sourcecode.

In addition, I've inserted a number of other local anchors: whatever links might be required to accommodate the editor's own cross-references, as well as a few others for my own purposes. If in turn you have a website and would like to target a link to some specific passage of the text, please let me know: I'll be glad to insert a local anchor there as well.


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Site updated: 4 Dec 16