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Part V
This webpage reproduces a section of
1895 Advisory Board Report
on the
Drainage of the City of New Orleans

Text and maps are in the public domain.


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Appendix I

This site is not affiliated with the US Military Academy.

Part VI
Estimates of Cost

Your Committee has considered it expedient to prepare two estimates. The first is for the whole area to be drained, and for the ultimate and entire completion of the system, with provisions for any extension or improvement that may be required during the next fifty years. The cost of each section is estimated separately. In the First Section, the canals and drains on the Reply-side of Claiborne Street are lined, while the Claiborne Canal and all canals and drains in the rear of it are unlined. In the Second and Third Sections the Main Canal on Broad Street and all canals and drains on the River- side thereof are lined, and all on the Lake-side are unlined. In the Fourth Section all canals and drains on the River-side of Claiborne Street are lined, while the Claiborne Canal and all canals and drains on the Lake-side thereof are unlined. In the Fifth Section all canals and drains are unlined. In Algiers the Eliza and Vallette street drains are lined. The other canals and drains in this section are unlined.

The second estimate is for carrying out the recommendations made on Page 41, namely for the early improvement of parts of the Second Section to an extent which may be within the present financial ability of the city. Approximate Estimate of Cost of Drainage System

Approximate Estimate of Cost for the Improvement of the Second Section as recommended:

Respectfully submitted, zzz The surveys, leveling, rain-fall and discharge gaugings, computations, mapping, etc., were executed by the Topographical Survey Department, under the direction of L. W. Brown, City Engineer. Engineering Staff: AR Littlejohn, 1st Asst. Engineer, WC Kirkland, Asst. Engineer, AL Black, Asst. Engineer, WT Crotts, Asst. Engineer, EL Lambert, Asst. Engineer, JF Dupuy, Asst. Engineer, AF Theard, Draughtsman, B. Shall, Computer. Appendices Appendix I Definitions and Descriptions of Names and Terms applied to different parts of the work

"Drainage Districts" refers to the sub-divisions of the city with reference to the existing drainage system, as shown on Plate III. The city is now divided into three districts, known as the First, Second, and Third Drainage Districts.

"Drainage Sections" refers to the proposed sub-divisions of the city into drainage areas, and conforms to the proposed drainage plan, as shown on Plate IV. There will be six of these sections, to be known as the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Algiers Sections. The area comprised in each section being that which will be drained by each of the five Main Pumping Stations, located on the Main Canal, as also one in Algiers.

The Draining Machines of the present system are five in number. They are designated by the names London, Orleans, Bienville, Melpomene and Dublin, and are located as shown on Plate III.

The Pumping Stations of the proposed system are nine in number, and are known as No. 1, located on Broad street, at the New Orleans Navigation Canal; No. 2, located at the intersection of Broad and St. Louis streets; No. 3, located at the intersection of Broad street and St. Bernard Avenue; No. 4, located at the intersection of Florida Avenue and Lafayette Avenue; No. 5, located at the intersection of Jourdan Avenue and Florida Avenue; No. 6, an auxiliary station, located at the intersection of Metairie Ridge and Upper Protection Levee; No. 7, an auxiliary station, located at the intersection of Taylor avenue and Orleans street; No. 8, an auxiliary station, located at the intersection of London and Monroe Avenues, and No. 9, located at the intersection of Canal avenue and Lawrence Street, in the Algiers Section.

"Cairo Datum," abbreviated "C. D.", refers to a plane 21.26 feet below Mean Gulf Level, and is the datum to which all elevations are referred.

"Main Canal" refers to the proposed Canal on Broad street, Hope street, and Florida Avenue from the Intersection of Nashville Avenue and Claiborne street to Pumping Station No. 5.

"Branch Canals" refers to all Canals discharging direct into the Main Canal.

"Main Drains" refers to conduits discharging into the Branch Canals.

"Branch Drains" refers to conduits discharging into Main Drains.

"Relief Branch Canals" refers to those Canals which lead from the Pumping Stations, located on the Main Canal, to the Auxiliary Stations, and which are used for a double purpose, namely, as Branch Canals during dry weather, and light storms, discharging into the Main Canal, and as Relief Canals during heavy storms, delivering the water to the Auxiliary Pumping Stations.

"Main Outfall Canal" refers to the Canal delivering the water from the Pumping Station on Florida Avenue at the intersection of Jourdan Avenue to the Bayou Bienvenu.

"Relief Outfall Canals" refers to the Canals delivering water from the three Auxiliary Pumping Stations, as also from Station No. 4 to Lake Pontchartrain.

"Street Gutters" refers to the small conduits, which may be covered or uncovered, collecting the water from the street and discharging into the Branch Drains.

"Run‑Off" refers to the rate of delivery of precipitation into the Canals and Drains.

"The Run‑Off Curves" on Plate VIII show in cubic feet per second, the volume of the run‑off which the proposed system is designed to effectively handle, from surfaces having different areas, slopes and density of population.

The word "Zone," where used in connection with this report, refers to the comparative impermeability of the surface of the ground.

"Zone A," refers to the densely improved sections, such as the territory embraced between the River, Rampart, Toulouse and Delord streets.

"Zone B," refers to a territory of medium density as to improvements, such as is embraced between Washington, Felicity, the River and St. Charles streets.

"Zone C," refers to sparsely built territory where the houses are surrounded by large yards with little or no pavement, such as the territory between Washington Avenue, Audubon Park, the River and St. Charles street.

"Zone D," refers to rural or agricultural areas such as Audubon Park, or farming lands.

The word "Normal," as used in this report, for drainage discharge, refers to the conditions existing when little or no rain-fall occurs. Appendix II Statement of Measures which have been taken, from time to time, relative to the Improvement of the Drainage of the City of New Orleans, and a Description of its Existing Condition

At different times during the past forty years, efforts have been made towards the proper drainage of the city; but, with the exception of the work done between the years 1871 and 1873, nothing of any permanent value, or of a nature embracing the completion of any comprehensive or general system, has been executed. For this fact, in connection with a brief review of our present condition, the conclusion is most apparent that the improvement in the drainage of the city has not been co‑extensive with its commercial growth.

The earliest report on the subject of drainage, is that of the City Surveyor, Mr. Louis H. Pilié, to the Common Council, in 1857, which treats wholly of the improvement of the drainage of that portion of the church lying to the rear of Claiborne street. This report recommended the construction of a number of open canals for drainage, and of levees to protect the city from inundation by the lake. The report is not accompanied by any plan, and does not clearly state what disposal of the drainage he proposed, or what locations were chosen at that time for the machinery, necessary for lifting the water. It is, however, quite apparent that it was Mr. Piliqq's idea to deliver the drainage into Lake Pontchartrain. Previous to the date of Mr. Piliqq's report, the Legislature of the State of Louisiana had taken steps towards the drainage of the rear portion of the city, as will appear from the following quotation from his report:

"I might say, en passant, that an appropriation by our last Legislature of five thousand dollars to pay two engineers to make a survey of the swamps in the rear of the city, and report on the advisability of draining same, amounts to a useless expenditure of public money."

No record is at hand to show that any practical results were obtained from the survey referred to.

The benefits that would accrue from the thorough drainage of the whole area occupied by the city, were appreciated forty years ago fully as much as now, as will appear by the following quotation from the same report:

"when the drainage of our swamps shall be perfected, our city will rank among the healthiest of the world. The growth and population of our city will rapidly appear, our commerce will be largely benefited, our population, far from seeking a residence during the summer and sickly months, will remain in the city and erect delightful residences along the lake shore, and upon the now swamp lands of our city, and thus a large amount of property, at present valueless, will amount to millions and swell our assessment rolls."

The Legislature in 1858, 1859, 1861 and 1871, enacted laws relative to the drainage of the City of New Orleans.

p48 Act No. 165 of the Legislature of 1858, relates to the dividing of the city into four drainage districts, and providing a commission for each district; and, also a mode of assessment for the operation of the same.

Act No. 179 of 1859 of the Legislature, amends Act No. 165 of 1858, by authorizing the issue of thirty year bonds, limiting the issue to $350,000 for any one of the four districts.

Act No. 57 of 1861 provides for the collection of assessments for drainage purposes.

Act No. 30 of 1871, authorizes a contract to be entered into by the City of New Orleans, with the Mississippi and Mexican Gulf Ship Canal Company, for the construction of levees to protect the city from overflow, and of canals and pumping machinery for the drainage of the city, the location of the levees and canals to be as may be determined by the administrators of the affairs of the city. This Act authorizes that the rate of charge for the work performed shall be fifty cents per cubic yard for all canals excavated, and fifty cents per cubic yard for all levees built.

In 1868, the City Surveyor, Mr. L. Surgi, submitted to the Common Council a possible relative to the drainage of the city. This report recommended the improvement of the existing condition of drainage by the construction of additional open canals, and improving the machinery. It does not contain any data as to the volume of water to be handled, or the point of outfall. In fact, the report merely recommends the enlargement and improvement of the existing canal system and drainage machines. In his report, Mr. Surgi refers to Lake Borgne and Bayou Bienvenu, as follows:

"Bayou Bienvenu empties into Lake Borgne and is one of the main natural drains of the lower section of the city from Esplanade street down."

With a view of perpetuating historical matter, the following is quoted from Mr. Surgi's report:

"As early as March, 1835, a charter was granted for a period of twenty years to the New Orleans Draining Company. Its object was to drain and reclaim, by means of canals and ditches, the land comprised between the upper limits of Suburb Livaudais, the line of the New Canal to Lake Pontchartrain, along the shore of said lake to Bayou Cochon, in a straight line to Fisherman's Canal, down thence to the Mississippi River."

In 1869, the Common Council, by Ordinance No. 1148, N. S., elected a Board of Engineers to mature and recommend some general plan for the present and future drainage of the City of New Orleans. This Board was composed of Messrs. Indicates a West Point graduate and gives his Class.Braxton Bragg, Indicates a West Point graduate and gives his Class.A. G. Blanchard, Richard J. Evans, John Roy, H. C. Brown, G. W. R. Bayley, L. Surgi, and J. A. D'Hémécourt. This Commission recommended, for immediate relief, the improvement of the drainage system as recommended in Mr. Surgi's report in the year previous, and above referred to; but added that the ultimate plan of drainage, should be by means of underground sewers, collecting the water and delivering into the river. This report was evidently compiled without any accurate knowledge either of the topography, or of the volumes of water to be handled. While it would not be impossible to collect the storm-waters in sewers and deliver the same to the river, it would be impracticable.

The work done by the Mississippi and Mexican Gulf Ship Canal Company in 1871, 1872 and 1873, under provision of Act No. 30, of 1871, was carried out p49under the direction of the City Surveyor, Mr. W. H. Bell, and was in accordance with what is known as the "Bell Plan." There is no complete description of the system as proposed by Mr. Bell to be found, but from such records as are available, it is evident the system proposed by him was for the delivery of the drainage of the main portion of the city directly into Lake Pontchartrain. Part of the system contemplated the construction of a substantial breakwater and levee along Lake Pontchartrain from the Upper Protection Levee to People's Avenue Canal, and locating along this revetment, the necessary pumping machinery to lift the water into the lake. It is also conclusively shown that Mr. Bell contemplated the repumping of the water, from the area of the city between the river and the ridge, in order to provide the necessary slope for its delivery through canals of practicable size, to the necessary slope for its delivery through canals of practicable size, to the machines placed at the lake for final disposal. Mr. Bell recommended Lake Borgne as the ultimate out‑fall of all the foul drainage of the city, as also on the delivery of the water to the machines located on the shore of Lake Pontchartrain, are fully set forth in the following letter:

To the Editor of the Times-Democrat:

New Orleans, Dec. 31, 1894.

During the discussion of the two plans for the drainage of the city now before the Council, I have seen it several times stated in print that the plan of drainage formulated by the committee on water and drainage is the system designed by my father, the late W. H. Bell. I admit that the present system of canals were designed by him and partly completed under the Mexican Gulf Canal Company drainage bill; but I most emphatically deny that he ever intended to make the mistake of depending on a single line of draining machines, located at the lake and at the head of Bayou Bienvenu, for the drainage of the city. The following quotations from his printed correspondence and reports are submitted to substantiate my denial:

Surveyor's Office, Room No. 19, City Hall,
New Orleans, June 17, 1871.

"Hon. John Cochran, Administrator of Improvements:

"Dear Sir — In my reports to you I have confined my suggestions and estimates entirely to the main reservoirs and protective levees. I would now suggest that in the location of pumping machinery, it be placed with a view to the ultimate division of the city into urban and suburban drainage, the urban drainage to be conveyed by sewers or large iron pipes, below the city into Bayou Bienvenu, the pipes passing under the navigation canals. The suburban drainage to be emptied into Lake Pontchartrain. The first step toward a system of drainage is to prevent overflow from the Mississippi river and Lake Pontchartrain. The location of this machinery becomes a secondary consideration. Respectfully, etc.

W. H. Bell, City Surveyor."

The great error many persons fall into, is the idea that the drainage of this city can be drawn from the river bank and thrown into the lake by a single line of draining machines placed upon the lake shore. A practical objection arises in the fact that the land is comparatively flat for a distance of three miles (excepting the Metairie ridge) and in some places four miles, which great distance admits of no down grade or fall in the bottom of the canal. All the present canals are about level on the bottom, the fall being created by the action of the draining wheels upon the surface. Consequently, there is no current or action of water upon the bottoms of the canals, ZZZ hcn the great deposit near the thickly settled portions of the city. A single line of draining machines placed at the lake to drain from the river, or to drain from intermediate lines of machines, would require to be very powerful and great dip of wheel (to secure a current on the bottom of the canals), consequently a great weight of foundation and machinery, which is difficult to construct substantially upon that soil. By having three lines or divisions the breaking of machinery or caving of levee does not necessarily cause a general overflow.

p50 The above communication outlines a system of drainage which in its main points is the same as that outlined by the Advisory Board of Engineers in their preliminary report to the City Council. It also shows very conclusively that my father, upon a thorough investigation of the subject had become convinced that the only way to thoroughly and rapidly drain the city was by rehandling the water, or in other words, the system must be cumulative. To sustain his position on this point I append a quotation from a communication to Mayor Benjamin F. Flanders, by G. W. R. Bayley, civil engineer, in his discussion of the drainage problem at that time:

"The location of the draining machines along the lake shore will not enable us to dispense with the present draining machines. To the contrary, additional machines will be needed, and are now needed, between the foot of the slope from the river and the Metairie ridge, as well as upon the ridge. It, of course, must rise at the foot of the first slope, until the head is sufficient to give a current strong enough to carry off the water as fast as it comes down the slope from the river. This rise during heavy rains, without draining machines at and on the river side of the ridge, would cause the overflow of the city from Claiborne or Galvez street to the ridge, if we had no matter how many draining machines on the lake shore. Draining machines and canals give an artificial slope down a series of inclines."

Respectfully, A. C. Bell, Civil Engineer.

In 1881, a communication was addressed to the Honorable Mayor and Administrators of the City of New Orleans by Mr. Joseph Jouet. The plan contemplated the construction of a large central canal, which would act as a main tail-race for all the drainage, to run from the Upper Protection Levee and connect with Bayou Bienvenu, through which all the drainage water of the City of New Orleans would be delivered to Lake Borgne.

In 1889, a plan for the drainage of the City of New Orleans was presented to the City Council by Mr. J. L. Gubernator, which, with some modifications, was submitted by him to the present Advisory Board. The general features of this plan are the delivery of the water into Lake Pontchartrain, the improvement of existing canals, the construction of a large number of additional open canals and the placing of a large number of drain u machines.

The plan presented to the Advisory Board by Mr. S. D. Peters, is for the delivery of all the drainage of the city through a main central canal to Lake Borgne. The drainage received from the different areas of the city is to be pumped into this main canal, and the main canal relieved by a pump at its lower end. The general features of the plan presented by Mr. Peters are similar to those contained in Mr. Jouet's plan of 1881.

In 1890, the Orleans Levee Board offered a premium of $2500.00 for the best plan of drainage for the City of New Orleans. The only data which they could furnish those who desired to enter this competition, was a general plan of the city. No exact knowledge could be given as to topography, areas, hydrography, or other data essential for the formulation of an efficient plan. Although there were several plans submitted in response to the advertisement, none could be accepted, for the reason that there was no reliable knowledge of the factors which were essential in determining the value of any of the plans submitted.

The necessity of making investigations relative to the topography and hydrography of the city, for the purpose of formulating a plan of drainage, has long been appreciated and, in 1888, an endeavor was made in the Legislature to pass an act enabling this preliminary work to be executed. The City Engineer, B. M. Harrod, made strenuous efforts to secure the necessary funds from the City Council, but without success. An attempt to obtain the funds by private subscription p51from public spirited citizens, also failed, and no measures looking towards the execution of this very essential preliminary work, were adopted until September, 1892, when an ordinance was introduced in the Council appropriating $17,500.00 for the purpose. This step met with considerable opposition, principally due to the supposition that the investigation had been made by previous administrations, and that the data could be found. A rigid search was made for records of this nature, but without result. The necessity for obtaining this information was demonstrated to the Council, and the ordinance authorizing the work, and providing the funds therefor, was adopted by it in February, 1893. The work was inaugurated thereafter, with as little delay as possible.

As shown in the above statement of the various attempts that have been made relative to the improve of the drainage of the City of New Orleans, no work of any magnitude has been done since 1872 and 1873, under what was known as the "Bell Plan."

As stated in the body of the report, the Canals and Draining Machinery have not sufficient capacity to deliver the water to the out-falls with such rapidity, as to avoid the inundating of large and valuable areas; in fact, the investigations which have been made show, that when working at their maximum capacity they are capable only of properly disposing of the run‑off from 1/100 of an inch rain-fall in 5 minutes, or 12/100 in one hour, which, in comparison to storms such as visited the City of New Orleans on August 13, 1894, is entirely inadequate. The water from this storm remained on a large territory of the city for a period of 72 hours before the existing machinery, working at its full capacity, removed same.

The existing system of drainage is composed, as stated in the body of the Report, of open canals receiving the water delivered from the higher portions of the city by the small street gutters, and conveyed by these open canals to the draining machines, which deliver the same into Lake Pontchartrain. These draining machines are four in number, and are located in the bottom of the basin between the river and the Metairie and Gentilly Ridges, excepting the London draining machine, which is located on Gentilly Ridge.

The Dublin draining machine is located at the intersection of 14th and Dublin streets, and has a maximum capacity to deliver 480 cubic feet of water per second, with a lift of five feet. This machine is composed of two wheels, one being 34 feet in diameter and 6 feet face and the other being 34 feet 4 inches diameter, with a face of 5 feet 9 inches.

The Melpomene draining machine is located at the intersection of Claiborne and Melpomene streets, and has maximum capacity to deliver 150 cubic feet of water per second, with a lift of 5 feet. This machine has only one wheel, which is 35 feet diameter, 4 feet 6 inch face.

The Bienville draining machine is located at the intersection of Hagan Avenue and Toulouse street, and has a maximum capacity to deliver 240 cubic feet of water per second, with a lift of 5 feet. This machine consists of two draining wheels, one being 28 feet 6 inches in diameter, 4 feet 4 inches face, and the other 34 feet in diameter and 7 feet face.

The London draining machine is located at the intersection of London Avenue and Gentilly Ridge, and has a maximum capacity to deliver 300 cubic feet of water per second, with a lift of 5 feet. This machine consists of two draining wheels, each of which is 35 feet in diameter and 4 feet 10 inches face.

p52 There is located at the intersect into no Bayou St. John and Orleans streets a centrifugal pump, delivering into the lake through the same tail-race as the Bienville machine. This pump has a maximum capacity of 44 cubic feet of waterer second, with a lift of 5 feet.

The area of the city now drained is divided into three districts by the two Navigation Canals.

These districts are known as first, second and third, and embrace an aggregate of 13,557 acres. The location of these districts, as also of the draining machines, is shown on Plate III.

The area of the city now drained extends only from the River to the Metairie and Gentilly Ridges, and a portion of this territory is wholly undrained ZZZ raind and other portions, of considerable area, are but partially drained.

The first drainage district embraces that portion of the city between the River, Metairie Ridge, the two Navigation Canals, Julia and Toulouse streets and has an area of 2,170 acres which is tributary to the Bienville draining machine.

The second district embraces that portion of the city between the River, Metairie Ridge, Upper Protection Levee, New Orleans Navigation Canal and Julia street, and has an area of 7,709 acres which is tributary to the Dublin and Melpomene draining machines.

The third district embraces that portion of the city between the River, Gentilly Ridge, Carondelet Canal, Bayou St. John, Toulouse and Elysian Fields streets, also between Elysian Fields and Poland streets from the River to Claiborne street, aggregating an area of 3,740 acres, which is tributary to the London draining machine and the Orleans pump.

The section of the city known as algiers, situated on the right bank of the river, has no drainage system.

As above noted, the total area of the city on the left bank of the river now drained has an aggregate area of 13,357 acres, which, as shown, is very imperfectly drained, and is about one-half of the area which the plan proposes to thoroughly drain, the aggregate area of which is 24,932 acres including Algiers.

The draining Machinery, with the exception of the Orleans pump, has been in service for upwards of forty (40) years, and is consequently primitive and not economical in its operation.

Considering the matter from every point, our present situation as to drainage in conjunction with the topographical and hydrographical conditions, renders the formulating of a thoroughly efficient and comprehensive system of drainage for the city an unique and intricate problem, and, perhaps, is unparalleled in this country or Europe, and the solving of the problem renders absolutely necessary a most careful and rigid investigation into all of the conditions bearing on the subject. Appendix III Topographical Survey

The topographical survey was started in July, 1893. The preliminary work had been well advanced, when, on September the 8th, it was stopped by an injunction issued by the Civil District Court, and not resumed until about the middle of December, 1893, since which time it has proceeded uninterruptedly, all the field-work being completed about the first of January, 1895.

A complete survey of the city has been made, and embraces the area bounded by the Mississippi River, Lake Pontchartrain, the Upper Protection Levee, People's Avenue Canal from Lake Pontchartrain to Florida Avenue, Florida Avenue from People's Avenue to the lower limits of the city, and the latter from Florida Avenue to the Mississippi River, and also the principal portion of Algiers. This survey was made by the establishment of carefully measured base lines around and within the area. The lines which have been traversed aggregate more than one hundred and fifty miles in length, and are as follows:

around the entire area on the left bank, as above described.

on Washington street, from the River to Carrollton avenue.

on Carrollton avenue, from the River to Metairie Ridge, near the Lower City Park, and extending to and crossing Bayou St. John at Marigny avenue, thence down and along Marigny avenue to elysian Fields street, and thence to the intersection of Florida Avenue and People's Avenue Canal.

A line on Tenth and Claiborne streets, commencing at the Upper Protection Levee and extending throughout the whole length of Claiborne street to Poland street.

A line on Elysian Fields street, from the River to the Lake.

A line on Broad street, from Julia street to Marigny avenue.

A line on esplanade avenue, from the River to Bayou St. John.

A line on London avenue, from Marigny avenue to the Lake.

A line on St. Peter street, from the River to Carrollton avenue, thence along the Orleans tail-race to the Lake.

A line on Julia street, from the River to Rampart street, and thence along the New Orleans Navigation Canal to the Lake.

A line on Seventeenth street, from Carrollton avenue to Metairie Ridge and thence along Metairie Ridge from the Upper Protection Levee to esplanade avenue.

A line on St. Charles avenue, from Carrollton avenue to Julia street.

A line on St. Claude street, from Elysian Fields street to the lower limits of the city.

A line on Felicity Road, from the River to Claiborne street, and thence along the Melpomene Canal to the intersection of Washington Shell Road.

A line on Lowerline street, from the River to Claiborne street.

A line on Walnut street, from the River to Ouachita street.

A line on Claiborne street, from the River to St. Charles avenue.

A line on Webster street, from the River to st. Charles avenue.

p54 on Henry Clay avenue, from st. Charles avenue to Claiborne street.

A line on Peters avenue, from the River to Hector street.

A line on Joseph street, from the River to St. Charles avenue.

A line on Octavia street, from St. Charles avenue to Arcadia street.

A line on Valmont street, from the River to Breslau street.

A line on Milan street, from st. Charles avenue to Claiborne street.

A line on General Taylor street, from the River to St. Charles avenue.

A line on Amelia street, from the River to Claiborne street.

A line on Delachaise street, from the River to Claiborne street.

A line on Toledano street, from the River to Claiborne street.

A line on Harmony street, from the River to Magnolia street.

A line on First street, from the River to st. Charles avenue.

A line on Philip street, from the River to Claiborne street.

A line on St. Andrew street, from the River to Claiborne street.

A line on Lafayette avenue, from the River to Josephine street.

A line on Lafayette street, from the River to Claiborne street.

A line on Adams street, from the River to St. Claude street.

A line on Delery street, from the River to St. Claude street.

A line on Camp street, from Felicity Road to Delord street.

A line on St. Thomas street, from Robin street to Delord street.

A line on Robin street, from the River to St. Thomas street.

A line on Delord street, from St. Thomas street to Claiborne street.

A line on Locust street, from Lafayette street to Common street.

A line on Liberty street, from Julia street to Tulane avenue.

A line on Galvez street, from Julia street to St. Peter street.

A line along London Avenue Tail-race, from the Upper Protection Levee to the London Avenue Draining machine.

A line on St. Bernard avenue, from Claiborne street the Treasure street.

A line on Taylor avenue from Orleans street to Bayou St. John.

A line on Harrison avenue, from Orleans street to Bayou St. John.

A line was run along Gentilly Road, as also on the right bank (Algiers side) of the river from the nine mile point oppose Carrollton to Webster avenue below the Southern Pacific Railroad Depot. Also the necessary lines in Algiers to make a complete survey of same. The notes of all these surveys have been calculated by means of Latitude and Departure and plotted. All the note books of this work are indexed and filed.

Where necessary, off‑set lines from these traverse lines were made to enable a thoroughly correct map of the city to be plotted.

The entire city has been leveled over, bench marks were established at convenient points, and a record of the location and elevation of the same registered in a book of bench-marks. The whole work refers to Cairo Datum.

The leveling consisted in the main, of running each leading street and obtaining the elevation of the curb, gutter, center of street and property line at intersections, and in center of block, as also the elevation of the tops of all culverts, bridges and steam and street railroad tracks at intersections.

Lines on all of the existing drainage canals and tail-races were run, and the elevations obtained of the surface of the ground adjacent to the bank, the surface of the water and the bottom of the canals.

p55 Profiles of all leading streets have been plotted and the originals carefully indexed and filed.  District.

 District. The following is a list of the profiles made: District.

 District. Adams (now Alabo) Street, from the River street to Claiborne Street, 3d District. Adams Street, from the River to Tenth Street, 7th District. Adele Street, from River street to St. Thomas Street, 4th District. Aline Street, from Tchoupitoulas street to St. Charles avenue, 6th District. Amelia Street, from Front street to Clara Street, 6th District. Anthonia Street, from St. Claude street to Marigny avenue, 3d District. Antonine Street, from Tchoupitoulas street to St. Charles avenue, 6th District. Andry Street, from the River to St. Claude Street, 3d District. Arts Street, from Urquhart street to Claiborne Street, 3d District. Aubrey Street, from Tonti street to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Audubon Street, from Water street to Claiborne Street, 6th District. Austerlitz Street, from the River to Perrier Street, 6th District. Arabella Street, from the River to St. Charles avenue, 6th District. Anthonia Street, from Marigny avenue to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Alexander Street, from the River to St. Charles avenue, 6th District. Atlantic Avenue, from Patterson street to Lapeyrouse Street, 5th District. Banks Street, from Prieur street to Murat Street, 1st District. Barracks Street, from the River to Broad Street, 2d District. Bartholomew Street, from the River to Claiborne Street, 3d District. Baudin Street, from Broad street to Murat Street, 1st District. Bellecastle Street, from the River to Perrier Street, 6th District. Bellechaise Street, from Tchoupitoulas street to St. Thomas Street, 1st District. Berlin Street, from the River to Claiborne Street, 6th District. Bienville Street, from the River to Metairie Ridge Street, 2d District. Bordeaux Street, from the River to St. David Street, 6th District. Broadway Street, from the River to Tenth Street, 6th District. Bourbon Street, from Canal street to Marigny avenue, from 2d and 3d Districts. Broad Street, from Julia street to Toulouse Street, 1st and 2d Districts. Broad Street, from Esplanade avenue to Lapeyrouse Street, 3d District. Burdette Street, from the River to Tenth Street, 7th District. Burgundy Street, from Canal street to Poland Street, from 2d and 3d Districts. Bourbon Street, from Marigny avenue to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Bolivar Street, from Lafayette street to Tulane avenue, 1st District. Bruxelles Street, from St. Bernard avenue to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Basin Street, from Julia street to Toulouse Street, 1st District. Benjamin Street, from Audubon Park street to Eleonore Street, 6th District. Bartholomew (now Bermuda) Street, from Levee street to Eliza Street, 5th Districts.º Bringier Street, from Madison street to Chestnut Street, 5th District. Bouny Street, from Levee street to Market Street, 5th District. Cadiz Street, from the River to Claiborne Street, 6th District. Caffin's Avenue, from the River to Claiborne Street, from 3rd District. Calhoun Street, from Tchoupitoulas street to St. Charles avenue, 6th District. Calliope Street, from the River to Claiborne Street, 1st District. Canal Street, from the River to Metairie Road, 1st and Second Districts. Celeste Street, from South Peters street to Felicity Street, 1st District. Chartres Street, from Canal street to Esplanade avenue, 2d District. Chippewa Street, from Felicity Road street to Louisiana avenue, 4th and 6th Districts. Clio Street, from Camp street to Claiborne avenue, 1st District. Clouet Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Commercial Place Street, from Camp street to St. Charles Street, 1st District. Common Street, from the River to Protection Levee Street, 1st District. Columbus Street, from Rampart street to Broad Street, from 3d. District. Conery Street, from Prytania street to Carondelet Street, 4th District. Congress Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Constantinople Street, from Front street to St. Denis Street, 6th District. Conti Street, from the River to Bernadotte Street, 2d District. Customhouse Street, from the River to Helena Street, 2d District. Cypress Street, from Liberty street to Galvez Street, 1st District. Carrollton Avenue, from the River to Canal Street, 7th District. Claiborne Street, from Julia street to Elysian Fields Street, 1st Street, from 2d Street, from and 3d Districts. District. Camp Street, from Canal street to Napoleon avenue, 1st Street, 4th and 6th Districts. Castiglione Street, from Broad street to Gentilly road, 3d District. Clinton Street, from Customhouse street to Bienville Street, 2d District. Chestnut from Felicity Road street to Audubon Park Street, 4th and 6th Districts. Constance from Felicity Road street to Audubon Park Street, 4th and 6th Districts. Canal (now Whitney) Avenue, from Patterson street to Lapeyrouse Street, 5th District. Chestnut (now Belleville) Street, from Patterson street to Lapeyrouse Street, 5th District. Columbus Street, from Madison street to Verret Street, 5th District. D'Abadie Street, from Galvez street to Gentilly road, 3d District. Dauphine Street, from Canal street to Delery Street, from 2d and 3d Districts. Delachaise Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Delery Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Delord Street, from Front street to Lee Circle Street, 1st District. Desire Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Deslonde Street, from Royal street to St. Claude Street, 3d District. Dorgenois Street, from Julia street to Toulouse Street, 1st and 2d Districts. Dufossat Street, from the River to Long Street, 6th District. Dumaine Street, from Delord street to Canal Street, 1st District. Dryades Street, from Delord street to Canal Street, 1st District. Edmund (now Calhoun) Street, from St. Charles Avenue to Leonce Street, 6th District. Egania Street, from the River to Canal Street, 3d District. Eighth Street, from the River to Dryades Street, 4th District. Eleonore Street, from the River to St. Charles Avenue, 6th District. Elmire Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Elysian Fields Street, from the River to Marigny Avenue, 3d District. Enghein Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Erato Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 1st District. Esplanade Avenue, from the River to Bayou St. John Street, from 2d and 3d Districts. Euterpe Street, from Coliseum street to Liberty Street, 1st District. Elmira Street, from Patterson street to Lapeyrouse Street, 5th District. Feliciana Street, from St. Claude street to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. First Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. Flood Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Forstall Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Foucher Street, from Tchoupitoulas street to Green Street, 6th District. Fourth Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. France Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Frenchmen Street, from Esplanade Avenue to Marigny Avenue, 3d District. Florida Street, from Gentilly Road street to esplanade Avenue, 3d District. Fourth Street (now Oaks) Street, from Jackson street to Lowerline Street, 7th District. Fortin Street, from Gentilly Road street to Mystery Street, 3d District. Franklin Avenue, from Market street to Lapeyrouse Street, 5th District. Gaiennie Street, from Pillie street to Camp Street, 1st District. Galvez Street, from Julia street to Toulouse Street, 1st and 2d Districts. Gasquet Street, from Basin street to Bernadotte Street, 1st District. General Taylor Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Girod Street, from Levee street to North Liberty Street, 1st District. Gordon Street, from Chartres street to Villere Street, 3d District. Gravier Street, from the River to Pierce Street, 1st District. Galvez Street, from Esplanade Avenue to Lapeyrouse Street, 3d District. Hagan Avenue, from Julia street to Canal Street, 1st District. Hancock Street, from the street to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Harmony Street, from the street to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. Havana Street, from Miro street to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Henderson Street, from Water street to Tchoupitoulas Street, 1st District. Henry Clay Avenue, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Hillary Street, from the River to Sixth Street, 7th District. Hospital Street, from the River to Broad Street, 2d District. Howard Avenue, from Lee Circle street to Rampart Street, 1st District. Howell Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Hunter Street, from Peter street to Tchoupitoulas Street, 1st District. Hurst Street, from Audubon Park street to Joseph Street, 6th District. Independence Street, from Peters street to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Jackson Avenue, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. Jackson Street (now General Ogden) Street, from the River to Tenth Street, 7th District. Jeanne (now Alva) Street, Peters street to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Jena Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Joseph Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Josephine Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. Jourdan Avenue, from the River to Marais Street, 3d District. Julia Street, from the River to Galvez Street, 1st District. Kerlerec Street, from Dauphine street to Dorgenois Street, 3d District. Kentucky Street, from the River to Villere Street, 3d District. Lafayette avenue, from St. Bernard Avenue to Broad Street, 3d District. Laharpe Street, from London Avenue to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Lapeyrouse Street, from Claiborne avenue to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Leonidas Street, from the River to Tenth Street, 7th District. Leontine Street, from the River to St. Charles Street, 6th District. Lesseps Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Lizardi Street, from the River to St. Claude Street, 3d District. London Avenue, from St. Bernard Avenue to Broad Street, 3d District. Louisa Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Louisiana Avenue, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Lowerline Street, from the River to Tenth Street, 7th District. Lyons Street, from the River to Pitt Street, 6th District. London Avenue, from Marigny Avenue to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Laurel Street, from Louisiana Avenue to Audubon Park Street, 6th District. Lawrence Street, from Levee street to Chestnut Street, 5th District. LeBoeuf Street, from Patterson street to Eveline Street, 5th District. Madison (now Dante) Street, the River to Tenth Street, 7th District. Mandeville Street, from the River to Galvez Street, 3d District. Market Street, from Water street to Felicity Road, 1st District. Marigny Street, from Levee street to Prieur Street, 3d District. Mazant Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Melpomene Street, from St. Thomas street to Claiborne avenue, 1st District. Milan Street, from Front street to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Miro Street, from Julia street to Toulouse Street, 1st and 2d Districts. Monroe (now Tupelo) Street, from The street to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Music Street, from Burgundy street to Celestine Street, 3d District. Montegut Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Marengo Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Magazine Street, from Canal street to Audubon Park Street, 1st Street, 4th and 6th Districts. Maurepas Street, from gentilly Road street to Esplanade Avenue, 3d District. Murat Street, from Canal street to Orleans Street, 2d District. Madison (now Brooklyn Avenue) Street, from Bringier street to Copernicus Street, 5th District. Market (now Opelousas Avenue) Street, from Levee street to Vallette Street, 5th District. Magellan Street, from Madison street to Verret Street, 5th District. Monroe (now Teche) Street, from Market street to Lawrence Street, 5th District. Napoleon Avenue, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Nashville Avenue, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Natchez Street, from Tchoupitoulas street to Camp 1st District. New Orleans Street, from Claiborne avenue to marigny Avenue, 3d District. Ninth Street, from the River to Magazine Street, 1st District. Notre Dame Street, from the River to Magazine Street, 1st District. Nunn Street, from South Peters street to Religious Street, 4th District. Nelson (now Serantine) Street, from Broad street to Gentilly Road, 3d District. New Orleans Street, from Marigny Avenue to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Octavia Street, from six thousand street to St. Charles Street, 6th District. Orange Street, from the River to Felicity Road, 1st District. Orleans Street, from Royal street to Bayou St. John Street, 2d District. Onzaga Street, from Prieur street to Gentilly Road, 3d District. O'Reilly Street, from Broad street to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Olivier Street, from the River to Market Street, 5th District. Palmyra Street, from Claiborne avenue to Bernadotte Street, 1st District. Pauline Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Peace (now Kerlerec) Street, from Charles street to Bourbon Street, 3d District. Penniston Street, from Front street to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Perdido Street, from St. Charles street to Hagan Avenue, 1st District. Perilliat Street, from Liberty street to Magnolia Street, 1st District. Peters Street, from Flood street to Barracks Street, 3d District. Peters Avenue, from the River to Bartholomew Street, 6th District. Philip Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. Pine Street, from Levee street to Zimple Street, 6th District. Piety Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Pleasant Street, from the River to St. Charles Street, 4th District. Poeyfarre Street, from Tchoupitoulas street to Camp Street, 1st District. Poland Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Polymnia Street, from Coliseum street to Dryades Street, 1st District. Port Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Poydras Street, from the River to Broad Street, 1st District. Press Street, from the River to Broad Street, 3d District. Prytania Street, from Louisiana Avenue to Calhoun Street, 6th District. Pitt Street, from Louisiana Avenue to Audubon Park Street, 6th District. Paris Avenue, from St. Bernard Avenue to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Perrier Street, from Nashville Avenue to Audubon Park Street, 6th District. Pacific Avenue, from Patterson street to Lapeyrouse Street, 5th District. Race Street, from the River to Coliseum Street, 1st District. Rampart Street, from Calliope street to Poland Street, 1st Street, from 2d and 3d Districts District. Reynes Street, from the River to Villere Street, 3d District. Richard Street, from the River to Felicity Road, 1st District. Robert Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Rocheblave Street, from Julia street to Toulouse Street, 1st and 2d Districts. Robin Street, from Levee street to Camp Street, 1st District. Royal Street, from Canal street to Poland Street, from 2d and 3d Districts. St. Andrew Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. St. Ann Street, from the River to Broad Street, 2d District. St. Anthony Street, from Burgundy street to marigny Avenue, 3d District. St. Bernard Avenue, from St. Claude street to Broad Street, 3d District. St. Bernard (now Allen) Street, from Claiborne avenue to Marigny Avenue, 3d District. St. Ferdinand Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. St. James Street, from the River to Felicity Road, 1st District. St. Joseph Street, from Delta street to Baronne Street, 1st District. St. Louis Street, from the River to Metairie Ridge Street, 2d District. St. Peter Street, from the River to Bayou St. John Street, 2d District. St. Philip Street, from the River to Bayou St. John Street, 2d District. St. Mary Street, from the River to Carondelet Street, 4th District. St. Thomas Street, from Felicity Road street to Toledano Street, 4th District. Sixth Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. Seventh Street, from the River to Locust Street, 4th District. Second Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. Short Street, from the River to Tenth Street, 7th District. Soniat Street, from the River to Story Street, 6th District. Soraparu Street, from the River to Annunciation Street, 4th District. Spain Street, from the River to Prieur Street, from 3d District. State Street, from the River to St. Charles Street, 6th District. St. Bernard (now Allen) Street, from Marigny Avenue to Gentilly Road, 3d District. St. Anthony Street, from Marigny Avenue to Gentilly Road, 3d District. St. Charles Avenue, from Julia street to Carrollton Avenue, 1st Street, 4th Street, 6th and 7th Districts. St. Bernard Avenue, from Broad street to Gentilly Road, 3d District. State Street, from St. Charles street to Victor Street, 6th District. Seguin Street, from Patterson street to Market Street, 5th District. Terpsichore Street, from the River to Magnolia Street, 1st District. Thalia Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 1st District. Theresa Street, from Tchoupitoulas street to St. Thomas Street, 1st District. Third Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. Toledano Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th and 6th Districts. Tonti Street, from Julia street to Toulouse Street, 1st and 2d Districts. Toulouse Street, from the River to Metairie Ridge Street, 2d District. Triangle Street, from Front street to Peters Street, 1st District. Tricou Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 3d District. Tchoupitoulas Street, from Canal street to Audubon Park Street, 1st Street, 4th and 6th Districts. Thayer Street, from Patterson street to Lapeyrouse Street, 5th District. Union Street, from St. Charles street to Dryades Street, 1st District. Union (now Touro) Street, from Peace street to Gentilly Road, 3d District. Upperline Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Upperline Street, from the River to Tenth Street, 7th District. Ursulines Street, from the River to Rendon Street, 2d District. Urania Street, from Coliseum street to Felicity Road, 1st District. Valence Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Valmont Street, from the River to Leonie Street, 6th District. Valette the River to Lapeyrouse Street, 5th District. Verret Street, from the River to Lapeyrouse Street, 5th District. Walnut Street, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 6th District. Warsaw Street, from St. Bernard avenue to Valette Street, 3d District. Washington Avenue, from the River to Claiborne avenue, 4th District. Washington (now St. Roche) Avenue, from Chartres street to Celestine Street, 3d District. Webster Street, from Tchoupitoulas to St. Charles avenue, 6th District.

A map on a scale of 600 feet to the inch has been plotted from the actual traverse lines as above enumerated, on which map has also been placed, one foot contour lines. There has also been made a map of each of the proposed drainage sections, showing the location of the conduits and area of different zones tributary to same. Appendix IV Rain-fall gauging

For the purpose of obtaining accurate information regarding the precipitation, six "Frieze" self-registering rain gauges were purchased and placed at selected points throughout the city. These gauges automatically register the precise time and rate of precipitation, the amount being registered so as to read to hundredths of an inch. The total amounts recorded by the gauge were checked by actual measurement with a graduated stick. Plate VI shows the records of the rain storms which occurred on April 24th, July 4th, July 14th and August 13th, 1894. The locations selected for the gauges were such as to furnish the rate and intensity of precipitation in the different parts of the area now subject to drainage. One gauge was placed in Audubon Park near the river, one at the Dublin Avenue Draining Machine, one at the London Avenue Draining Machine, one at the corner of France and Levee streets, one at the City Hall, and one was located at West End, but was afterwards removed and placed at the corner of Magazine and Berlin Streets. These gauges were all installed, tested and in thorough operation by April 1st, 1894.

The necessity of having several gauges for the purpose of obtaining the average precipitation on a large area, is of paramount importance, as storms even of a general character, vary largely in precipitation, even within a small area and in New Orleans a large proportion of the storms are limited in area and do not simultaneously extend over the whole city. The records of precipitation at different points in any territory enable the direction and intensity of the storm to be observed and also indicate the sections which were visited by the greatest intensity during any one storm.

The records of rain-falls by these instruments have been carefully preserved and the volume of precipitation on the different areas calculated and tabulated.

Plate VII represents graphically the fall in inches and the duration of several storms of intense precipitation which have occurred in the City of New Orleans between April 1st and December 31st, 1894, the date of the several storms being marked on the plate.

Table I is a list of the storms which have occurred in the City of New Orleans between April 1st and December 31st, 1894, where the total precipitation did not exceed half an inch. This table also shows the maximum precipitation in five minutes, the maximum rate of precipitation per hour, the total precipitation in inches, the duration of storm, and the date.

Referring to this table it will be noted that the rate of precipitation is in many instances very great in comparison to the volume, as in the storm of April 25th when, with a total precipitation of 0.33 of an inch, the rate was 2.4 inches per hour; and five of these storms having a total precipitation of less than 0.5 of an inch had a rate of 1.8 inches per hour and upwards.

Table II is a list of the storms which have occurred in the City of New Orleans between April 1st and December 31st, 1894, having total precipitations p62exceeding 0.5 of an inch and shows the date of maximum intensity in five minutes, maximum rate per hour, maximum precipitation per hour, total precipitation and duration of storms. Of the twenty-four storms referred to in this table, eleven had a rate of precipitation exceeding three inches per hour. The storm of August 13th had a rate of precipitation of 6 inches per hour, and that of April 24th a rate of 5.4 inches per hour. These tables were compiled from gaugings made at the City Hall Station.

The greatest rate of precipitation on July 4th, as registered at the Park Station, was 7.2 inches per hour. It will also be noted that the greatest precipitation in one hour occurred on August 13th, when it was 2.75 inches, but the greatest intensity of this storm was at the rate of 6 inches per hour. On April 24th, with a maximum rate of 5.4 inches, the total precipitation in one hour was 1.9 inches, and on July 14th the maximum rate was 4.8 inches, and the total precipitation in one hour was 1.82 inches.

Table III is a list of storms of great intensity which have occurred in the States of Louisiana and Mississippi between the years 1872 and 1894.

Table IV is a list of storms which have occurred in the City of New Orleans from 1871 to 1894, in which the total precipitation exceeded 2.5 inches in twenty-four hours, as gauged by the New Orleans Station of the U. S. Signal Service and Department of Agriculture, Weather Bureau.

Table V is a list of storms which have occurred in the City of New Orleans from 1871 to 1894 in which the rate of precipitation exceeded one inch per hour, as gauged by the New Orleans Station of the U. S. Signal Service and Department of Agriculture, Weather Bureau. Appendix V Run‑off Gauging

In order to obtain the volumes of water discharged at the different draining machines, flumes were established in the out‑fall canals of the present drainage stations, for the purpose of obtaining uniform sections through which all the water lifted by each machine would pass. The dimensions of these flumes were such as to suit the existing conditions at the different stations:

At the Melpomene machine, the flumes had a width of 16 feet.
At the Bienville 23 feet.
At the Dublin 24 feet.
At the London 24 feet.

Across the top of each flume a suitable wharf was placed for the operator, provided with a strong substantial rail, which rail was graduated to facilitate the use of the meter. The gauging was performed with a "Price" current meter, and the operation was as follows:

The elevation of the water in the drainage and out‑fall canals was observed and noted every 30 minutes, the difference in elevation being the height to which the water was lifted. Each time the gauging was made, a cross-section of the bottom of the channel was carefully taken and plotted. The meter was then placed in position six inches below the surface of the water and moved across the canal at a uniform rate. After which, the meter was lowered six inches more or one foot below the surface and moved in the same manner, and so on, the number of times necessary for the meter to be moved across the channel every 6 inches of its depths, and the calculation of velocity and discharge made in the usual manner, from the number of revolutions recorded by the register.

There was, also, located on each shaft, at each of the draining machines, a counter, which was constantly observed and recorded. The coal consumed was carefully weighed and a daily report made. The gauging of the discharge from the machines has been carried on very carefully from April 1st to December 31st, 1894, and all the varying conditions carefully noted, recorded and tabulated; and from the information thus obtained, a curve has been plotted from which can be obtained the discharge of the wheels, knowing the number of revolutions of the wheel and the elevation of the water in the inside and outside canals. These gaugings of the discharge of the machines were extremely arduous, as it was necessary for the work to be carried on continuously during and after rains, in order to obtain positive information of the amount of rainwater discharged, thus rendering it necessary for the men to remain at work day and night, oftentimes incessantly for periods of 36 hours.

The records of the gaugings of precipitation and discharge have been accurately compiled and tabulated, and graphical charts showing the amount of precipitation, in millions of cubic feet, falling on the area drained by each of the machines, have been prepared. These charts also show graphically the amount of water, in millions of cubic feet, discharged by each machine, the lift in feet and the coal consumed in tons.

p64 Plate V is a chart showing graphically, from April 1st to December 31st, 1894, the volume of precipitation falling on the entire area of the city now subject to drainage, the volume discharged by all the draining machines, the duration of storms in hours, the lift in feet, the coal consumed in tons, and the total rainfalls in inches, as registered at the City Hall Station.

Table VI is a record of the gaugings from April 1st, to December 31st, 1894, of the total volume of precipitation and the total volume of discharge by the different draining machines for the entire area of the city now subject to drainage.

Table VII is a record of the gaugings from April 1st to December 31st, 1894, of the total volume of precipitation and discharge from the area now drained by the Bienville Draining machine, which area is designated as the "First Drainage District" on Plate III.

It will be observed from this table that the proportion of storm water pumped in the aggregate after deducting the daily or normal flow varies greatly with the character of soil, as to its degree of saturation and imperviousness, and with the intensity of rainfall, as shown by the following table:

April zzz zzz zzz zzz zzz
May zzz zzz zzz zzz zzz
June zzz zzz zzz zzz zzz
July zzz zzz zzz zzz zzz
August zzz zzz zzz zzz zzz
September zzz zzz zzz zzz zzz
October zzz zzz zzz zzz zzz
November zzz zzz zzz zzz zzz
December zzz zzz zzz zzz zzz

The largest proportion of the precipitation ultimately discharged by the draining machines was during the months of July and August, when heavy rainfalls occurred nearly every day.

During the month of October, after deducting the normal flow, the zzz djh exceeded the total volume of precipitation due to the fact that this month was very dry and a famine of cistern water prevailed. To alleviate the situation in the district drained by the Bienville Machine an extensive use was made of the water from the water works to supply, through gutters, the sections not having mains and a most liberal use of hydrants where mains existed, so that the normal flow was very largely increased. For the months of November and December it was from similar causes, also increased, so that the results for October, November and December cannot be considered as furnishing proper proportions as only comparatively light rains occurred during these months, a consideration of the results can be properly omitted.

The results from the other six months can be assumed as giving a reasonable proportion, under varying conditions, of the precipitation ultimately discharged by the present system. It will be noted that

p65 The soil during these four months was moderately saturated.

The soil during these two months was excessively saturated. During the two months of July and August it rained almost daily, but in July the daily rate of precipitation was more uniform than in August.

Table VIII is a record of the gaugings of the volume discharged by the several draining machines from the entire area of the city now subject to drainage, during a period of forty consecutive days, when no precipitation occurred. This Table also gives the volume of the average present normal discharge.

The area drained by the Dublin and Melpomene Stations (which stations act in conjunction in draining the area) has an aggregate of 7,709 acres. The present daily flow from this area, as determined by the foregoing table, equals 3.56 cubic feet per acre per hour.

The area drained by the Bienville draining machine (which is independent) has an aggregate of 2,170 acres. The daily flow, as ascertained from Table VIII would therefore amount to 20.8 cubic feet per acre per hour.

The area drained by the London Avenue Station has an aggregate of 3,478 acres. The daily flow from this area, as determined from Table VIII equals 5.8 cubic feet per acre per hour.

The ultimate daily flow to be discharged by the proposed system, will not be at a rate per acre, in excess of the daily flow now reaching the drainage stations. The sewerage system will be completed at an early date, and will receive a considerable portion of the water which now constitutes the daily flow, and an efficient system of drainage will deliver the run‑off into the outfall canals quickly, not allowing the water to remain on the soil, as it now does. This will very materially reduce the amount of percolation and the seepage forming a large part of the present normal or dry-weather flow.

The conclusion reached concerning the volume of daily flow to be handled is, that from the commercial part of the city, it will not exceed twenty (20) cubic feet per acre per hour, and, from the suburban and vacant portions of the city, five (5) cubic feet per acre per hour. On this basis, the system is arranged for the removal of the daily flow, which aggregates, at the different Pumping Stations, the following quantities:

Pumping Station No. 1 receives the drainage from 8,887 acres, aggregating 44,435 cubic feet to be delivered per hour.

Pumping Station No. 2 drains 5,384 acres (of which 1200 acres are allowed for at the rate of 20 cubic feet per acre per hour, aggregating 24,000 cubic feet, and 4184 acres at 5 cubic feet per acre per hour, aggregating 20,920 cubic feet per hour), making the total flow which will be required to be delivered from the section 44,920 cubic feet per hour.

The area drained at Pumping Station No. 3 contains 4,682 acres, and will furnish a normal flow of 23,410 cubic feet per hour.

Pumping Station No. 4 drains 2,153 acres, which will produce a normal flow of 10,765 cubic feet per hour.

Pumping Station No. 5 drains 2,878 acres, which will produce 14,390 cubic feet of normal flow per hour.

Algiers Station drains 948 acres, which will produce a normal flow of 4,740 cubic feet per hour. Appendix VI Tables Table I.— Storms occurring in New Orleans between April 1st and December 31st, 1894, having a total Precipitation of less than 0.50 inches; showing date, maximum intensity in five minutes, maximum rate per hour and duration of storm, as automatically registered at City Hall Station.

April 25 0.20 2.40 0.33 0 20 Short dash.
May 12 0.15 1.80 0.32 0 15 Short dash.
13 0.02 0.24 0.13 2 20 Intermit drizzle.
16   0.60 0.03 0 03 Short dash.
17 0.15 1.80 0.36 0 20 Short dash.
23     0.48 1 20 Register failed.
24 0.04 0.48 0.11 0 45 Drizzle.
June 6 0.07 0.84 0.11 0 45 Short dash.
8 0.15 1.80 0.29 0 25 Two short dashes.
10 0.10 1.20 0.35 8 00 Drizzle, except for 10 minutes when .12″ fell.
19 0.05 0.60 0.04 0 05  
20 0.02 0.24 0.04 0 10  
24   0.60 0.04 0 05 Short dash.
July 5 0.12 1.44 0.25 0 30 Several short dashes.
6 0.10 1.20 0.23 0 20 Two short dashes.
7 0.07 0.84 0.11 0 10 Short dash.
8 0.08 0.96 0.11 0 15 Two short dashes.
9 0.15 1.80 0.28 0 20 Short dash.
11 0.03 0.36 0.05 0 10 Short dash.
12 0.04 0.48 0.08 0 10 Drizzle.
13 0.01 0.12 0.03 0 20 Drizzle.
16 0.01 0.12 0.01 0 05 Drizzle.
18 0.02 0.24 0.16 2 00 Drizzle.
21 0.03 0.36 0.26 5 00 Drizzle.
27 0.02 0.24 0.10 0 50 Drizzle.
28 0.02 0.24 0.23 2 00 Drizzle.
Aug. 2 0.01 0.12 0.02 0 10 Drizzle.
3 0.02 0.24 0.06 0 25 Drizzle.
8 0.05 0.60 0.22 0 15 Drizzle.
9 0.10 1.20 0.50 0 30 Two short dashes.
10 0.15 1.20 0.50 0 30 Two short dashes.
15 0.06 0.72 0.13 0 22 Short dash.
17 0.01 0.12 0.02 0 10 Moderate shower.
21 0.10 1.20 0.43 0 50 Drizzle.
22 0.06 0.72 0.10 0 10 Several dashes.
23   0.60 0.03 0 03 Short dash.
24 0.07 0.84 0.31 0 30 Short dash.
27   0.60 0.03 0 03 Two short showers.
28 0.08 0.96 0.43 0 30 Short dash.
30   0.60 0.01 0 01 Steady shower.
Sep. 7   1.40 0.07 0 03 Short dash.
10 0.12 0.72 0.12 0 05 Short dash.
11 0.10 0.60 0.22 0 20 Short dash.
12 0.13 0.78 0.25 0 10 Short dash.
14 0.01 0.12 0.02 0 10 Short dash.
Nov. 13 0.05 0.60 0.15 0 25 Short shower.
18 0.10 1.20 0.23 0 40 Short shower.
Dec. 6 0.01 0.12 0.60 0 20 Drizzle.
9 0.01 0.12 0.02 0 10 Drizzle.
10 0.06 0.60 0.12 0 30 Short shower.
11 0.05 0.60 0.31 0 45 Short shower.
16 0.01 0.12 0.30 0 10 Drizzle.
Table II.— Storms occurring in New Orleans between April 1st, and December 31st, 1894, having a total Precipitation exceeding 0.50 inches showing date, maximum intensity in five minutes, maximum rate per hour, duration of storm and maximum precipitation in inches in one hour, as automatically registered at City Hall Station.
April 4 0.26 3.12 0.59 1 35 0.60 Steady rain.
9 0.30 3.60 0.85 2 10 0.60 Steady rain.
24 0.45 5.40 2.40 2 00 1.90 Intermit. showers.
29     0.67 3 10   Register failed.
May 14 0.15 1.80 0.60 2 00 0.37 Intermit't rain.
June 6 0.30 3.60 0.80 0 50 0.45 Intermittent showers.
9 0.25 3.00 1.12 1 00 0.70 Intermittent showers.
11 0.23 2.76 1.01 2 50 0.60 Steady rain.
17 0.25 3.00 0.70 0 15 0.70 Heavy shower.
18 0.15 1.80 0.60 0 40 0.60 Steady shower.
July 2 0.30 3.60 0.55 0 25 0.55 Heavy shower.
3, 4 0.35 4.20 1.56 3 00 1.10 Several heavy showers.
14 0.40 4.80 1.82 0 55 1.82 Heavy shower.
16 0.30 3.60 1.70 0 55 1.70 Steady rain.
18 0.20 2.40 0.81 0 25 0.81 Heavy shower.
20 0.15 1.80 1.10 3 20 0.48 Intermit't rain.
27 0.15 1.80 1.34 3 15 0.50 Intermit't rain.
Aug. 13 0.50 6.00 2.96 6 30 2.75 Very heavy shower.
16 0.40 4.80 0.70 0 25 0.70 Very heavy shower.
18 0.25 3.00 1.01 1 00 1.01 Very heavy shower.
Oct. 28 0.15 1.80 0.88 1 25 0.35 Intermit't showers.
Nov. 2 0.10 1.20 0.68 3 00 0.33 Steady rain.
Dec. 26 0.15 1.80 0.89 3 00 0.70 Intermit't showers.
30     0.57 4 00   Register failed.
Table III.— Showing date, duration, amount in inches and maximum intensity per hour of excessive precipitation in Louisiana and Mississippi, from 1872 to May, 1894, gauged by the United States Department of Agriculture — Weather Bureau.
New Orleans Louisiana July 6, 1889 1.40 0 15 5.60
Monroe Louisiana Sep. 22, 1890 4.12 0 45 5.49
Vicksburg Louisiana Nov. 15, 1879 1.82 0.20 5.46
Logtown Louisiana Nov. 11, 1892 2.10 0 30 4.20
Louisville Louisiana Feb. 26, 1890 1.93 0 30 3.86
Marksville Louisiana Aug. 27, 1892 1.25 0 20 3.75
Emilie Louisiana Sep. 3, 1891 1.24 0 20 3.72
Houma Louisiana Sep. 25, 1889 3.60 1 00 3.60
Batesville Mississippi June 24, 1892 1.72 0 30 3.44
Houma Louisiana Apr. 25, 1894 1.35 0 25 3.24
Louisville Louisiana June 17, 1889 1.59 0 30 3.18
Luling Louisiana July 21, 1889 1.53 0 30 3.06
Meridian Louisiana July 8, 1891 1.52 0 30 3.04
Amite City Louisiana July 3, 1890 1.01 0 20 3.03
Homer Louisiana Dec. 5, 1890 3.00 1 00 3.00
Monroe Louisiana June 17, 1893 1.48 0 30 2.96
Melville Louisiana Apr. 14, 1894 1.50 0 31 2.90
Greenville Louisiana May 6, 1893 2.17 0 45 2.89
Duck Hill Louisiana May 14, 1893 1.20 0 25 2.88
Fayette Louisiana Aug. 2, 1893 1.43 0 30 2.86
Waynesboro Louisiana Aug. 26, 1892 1.40 0 30 2.80
Houma Louisiana July 2, 1889 3.49 1 15 2.79
Waynesboro Louisiana July 27, 1891 1.86 0 40 2.79
New Orleans Louisiana Sep. 25, 1889 1.39 0 30 2.78
Marksville Louisiana Aug. 9, 1892 1.15 0 25 2.76
Sugar Experimental Station Louisiana Apr. 24, 1894 2.05 0 45 2.73
Rosebud Louisiana July 30, 1893 2.04 0 45 2.72
Coushatta Louisiana June 4, 1893 2.80 1 05 2.58
Pearlington Louisiana Aug. 15, 1889 2.55 1 00 2.55
Fayette Louisiana July 19, 1876 2.10 0 50 2.52
Sugar Experimental Station Louisiana Dec. 12, 1893 1.26 0 30 2.52
New Orleans Louisiana June 22, 1890 1.25 0 30 2.50
Jackson Barracks Louisiana July 15, 1890 1.25 0 30 2.50
Wallace Louisiana Aug. 23, 1893 1.25 0 30 2.50
Water Valley Louisiana May 27, 1893 3.03 1 13 2.49
New Orleans Louisiana July 3, 1881 2.48 1 00 2.48
Liberty Hill Louisiana July 8, 1892 2.23 0 55 2.43
Cameron Louisiana Sep. 25, 1893 1.21 0 30 2.42
Meridian Louisiana Sep. 5, 1889 1.60 0 40 2.40
Sugar Experimental Station Louisiana Sep. 14, 1891 1.20 0 30 2.40
New Orleans Louisiana Apr. 24, 1894 2.18 0 55 2.38
Winnfield Louisiana July 6, 1889 1.98 0 50 2.38
Lake Charles Louisiana Sep. 16, 1891 2.30 1 00 2.30
New Orleans Louisiana July 13, 1889 1.15 0 30 2.30
Farmerville Louisiana Mar. 23, 1893 1.13 0 30 2.26
Hattiesburg Louisiana July 2, 1893 1.13 0 30 2.26
Luling Louisiana Sep. 20‑21, 18'91 9.32 4 10 2.24
Clinton Louisiana Aug. 3, 1893 3.34 1 30 2.23
Houma Louisiana June 19, 1890 1.04 0 28 2.23
Plaquemine Louisiana July 7, 1890 2.20 1 00 2.20
Liberty Hill Louisiana June 18, 1890 1.28 0 35 2.19
Fayette Louisiana Aug. 31, 1877 2.00 0 55 2.19
Meridian Louisiana June 8, 1891 1.78 0 50 2.14
Lafayette Louisiana June 14, 1892 1.07 0 30 2.14
New Orleans Louisiana Apr. 17, 1890 1.70 0 48 2.13
Baton Rouge Louisiana July 11, 1892 1.60 0 45 2.13
Shreveport Louisiana Sep. 24, 1872 2.05 0 58 2.12
Meridian Louisiana Mar. 8, 1891 2.10 1 00 2.10
Water Valley Louisiana May 14, 1893 1.40 0 40 2.10
Rienzi Louisiana July 3, 1891 1.04 0 30 2.08
Homer Louisiana Dec. 6, 1892 1.02 0 30 2.04
Meridian Louisiana Mar. 8, 1891 1.52 0 45 2.03
Alexandria Louisiana Aug. 13, 1893 1.35 0 40 2.02
Wallace Louisiana July 18, 1893 2.01 1 00 2.01
Covington Louisiana Nov. 18, 1893 1.34 0 40 2.01
Edwards Louisiana Aug. 6, 1893 4.00 2 00 2.00
Shreveport Louisiana Dec. 11, 1884 2.00 1 00 2.00
New Orleans Louisiana June 6, 1888 2.00 1 00 2.00
New Orleans Louisiana Oct. 22, 1888 2.00 1 00 2.00
Houma Louisiana May 5, 1890 2.00 1 00 2.00
Vicksburg Louisiana June 12, 1891 2.00 1 00 2.00
Logtown Louisiana Nov. 2, 1892 2.00 1 00 2.00
Marksville Louisiana Oct. 20, 1892 1.50 0 45 2.00
New Orleans Louisiana July 7, 1890 1.00 0 30 2.00
Table IV.— Showing date and total precipitation of storms which have occurred in New Orleans, from 1871 to April, 1894, where the total precipitation was in excess of 2.5 inches in 24 hours, gauged by the New Orleans Station of the United States Department of Agriculture — Weather Bureau.
1871 October 2, 3 2.95
  October 30 3.04
  November 12, 13 2.80
1872 March 24, 25 4.50
  November 7, 8 4.448
  December 18 2.54
1873 May 5, 6 3.98
  May 20 3.29
  August 20, 21 4.08
  November 4, 5 2.61
1874 April 16 3.84
  July 3, 4 7.52
1875 February 19 3.71
  March 11, 12 2.75
  March 28, 30º 3.81
  April 20, 21 2.90
  August 11, 12 2.77
  September 25 5.28
  December 4 3.82
1876 March 19 3.98
  March 27 3.72
  April 7 5.51
  May 7, 8 4.09
  November 2 2.61
  December 31 2.59
1877 March 1 5.02
  September 17, 18 7.22
  October 24, 25 2.54
  October 29, 30 3.52
1878 March 9 2.73
  May 19 3.54
  July 21 2.74
1879 April 16 2.82
  August 13, 14 2.60
1880 March 8, 9 3.36
1881 January 3 2.82
  July 3 3.25
  November 6 2.99
  December 13, 14 2.32
1882   None
1883 January 18, 19 3.71
  March 24 2.60
  April 7, 8 9.22
  June 8, 9 2.68
1884 April 4, 5 2.96
1885 January 4, 5 2.62
  September 20 2.78
  September 25, 26 2.78
  December 12, 13 3.40
1886 January 14, 15 4.47
  April 27, 28 2.67
1887 June 29 5.47
  September 26, 27 2.88
  October 18, 19 3.19
1888 February 20, 21 2.72
  February 23, 24 4.21
  June 6 2.86
  June 26 4.44
  August 14, 15 3.70
  August 19, 20 8.90
  August 24, 25 2.80
  October 22, 23 4.13
1889 June 26 2.86
  June 30 2.76
1890 June 22, 23 3.08
  October 15, 16 2.63
1891 February 14, 15 2.60
  December 14, 15 2.92
1892 January 10, 11 2.85
  April 21, 22 7.49
  August 15, 16 3.85
1893 February 11, 12 2.72
  April 19 (8 hours 40 min.) 2.88
  June 5, 6 3.02
  October 1, 2 2.75
  November 26, 27 (9 hours 30 min.) 3.35
1894 February 20, 21 (24 hours) 3.59
Table V.— Showing date and total precipitation of storms, which have occurred in New Orleans from 1871 to April, 1894, when the rate of precipitation exceeded 1 inch per hour, gauged by the New Orleans Station of the United States Department of Agriculture — Weather Bureau.
1871 June 30 1.10
  July 31 1.16
1872   None
1873 May 20 1.47
1874   None
1875   None
1876   None
1877   None
1878   None
1879 April 16 1.00
  August 13 1.00
1880 August 3 1.17
1881 June 6 1.30
  zzz 3 2.48
1882 July 16 1.30
1883   None
1884 July 4 1.00
  October 21 1.00
1885   None
1886   None
1887   None
1888 February 23 1.27
  May 24 1.25
  June 6 2.00
  August (estimated) 3.00
  August 24 2.56
  October 22 2.00
1889 June — 1.19
  June 30 1.50
  July 6 (15 min.) 1.40
  July 8 1.95
  July 9 1.04
  July 12 1.20
  July 13 (30 min.) 1.15
  September 25 (30 min.) 1.39
1890 April 17 (45 min.) 1.70
  June 22 (30 min.) 1.25
  July 7 (30 min.) 1.00
  September 10 1.05
  October 15 1.50
  December 25 1.25
1891   None
1892 April 21 (2 hours) 2.90
  April 22 1.06
  May 9 1.13
  July 7 1.26
  August 16 1.07
1893 April 19 1.40
  November 26 (2 hours) 2.00
  December 12 (45 min.) 1.00
Table VI.— Record of gaugings from April 1st to December 31st, 1894, of total volume of precipitation and total volume of discharge from the entire area of the city now subject to drainage, the area aggregating 13,357 acres.
1    
2   4,550,173
3   2,768,739
4   3,581,264
5 33,131,597 11,413,954
6   4,527,620
7   6.048,954
8    
9 40,581,776 4,516,612
10   17,085,777
11   3,272,686
12   5,117,755
13   1,107,651
14   5,990,244
15    
16   2,226,474
17   4,816,311
18   2,215,178
19   3,984,561
20   1,247,879
21   4,217,058
22    
23   2,520,903
24 109,572,021 51,805,021
25    
26 13,392,899 8,491,852
27   4,244,115
28   6,592,796
29 13,049,487 7,113,106
30   7.254,587
Total 209,727,780 176,811,270
1 5,316,897 5,812,851
2   2,732,271
3   4,661,094
4   2,211,755
5   3,449,255
6    
7   2,818,392
8   4,260,136
9   1,473,820
10   2,189,256
11   1,436,479
12 10,568,708 5,163,372
13 10,874,464  
14 36,678,827 19,394,717
15   3,393,720
16 21,441,720 3,474,394
17 6,543,438 9,942,552
18   4,305,000
19   4,407,311
20    
21   2,113,696
22   2,474,031
23   3,512,325
24 23,518,552 5,002,028
25   3,249,710
26   4,027,785
27    
28   1,798,572
29   4,344,933
30   1,471,120
31   2,803,738
Total 114,942,606 111,924,313
1   1,407,511
2   4,672,014
3    
4   1,601,120
5   2,384,704
6 26,797,821 5,035,476
7   4,112,503
8   3,235,581
9 13,104,231 5,035,476
10 40,613,419 10,521,159
11 59,845,196 36,433,690
12   5,351,625
13   4,258,578
14   3,998,978
15   3,346,488
16   5,089,713
17 18,021,788 1,443,572
18 8,419,929 5,961,567
19 19,436,109 8,437,397
20 12,272,598 12,241,423
21 5,585,226 4,845,864
22   3,779,908
23 2,798,367 5,826,262
24 757,508  
25   3,653,736
26 3,578,887  
27   1,708,817
28   2,198,600
29   1,019,030
30   4,803,412
Total 207,652,192 157,400,551
1    
2 15,226,325 2,695,632
3 34,618,637 8,129,682
4 64,104,965 23,396,354
5 3,540,411 16,735,572
6 5,704,290 9,691,732
7 17,870,345 9,634,042
8 10,644,938 4,275,110
9 11,529,786 6,536,387
10   5,961,896
11   1,395,122
12 2,471,775 5,950,377
13 5,845,643 1,941,948
14 50,323,235 25,498,590
15 1,249,554 10,508,036
16 37,380,614 32,143,767
17 2,618,173 9,243,320
18 46,214,473 27,971,791
19   10,422,004
20 6,984,410 5,486,222
21 53,901,724 33,187,162
22 17,581,541 11,043,992
23   9,730,940
24   5,749,324
25   1,577,532
26 4,678,089 4,344,724
27 40,851,184 16,334,289
28 9,433,534 10,216,519
29   6,456,700
30   5,685,109
31 484,858 3,795,955
Total 443,258,504 325,739,830
1   3,606,698
2 2,648,737 2,817,843
3 11,483,395 4,470,437
4 717,215 5,207,186
5    
6   2,619,090
7   4,465,306
8 6,929,742 1,642,850
9 8,513,439 4,845,860
10 16,576,939 5,276,769
11   7,364,698
12    
13 142,915,496 27,048,047
14 615,067 45,450,522
15 23,340,593 24,630,954
16 14,761,939 14,599,248
17 9,314,470 10,943,000
18 43,553,140 28,591,249
19   13,759,946
20   7,917,928
21 37,179,440 9,533,867
22 4,666,945 18,151,003
23   11,024,223
24 21,522,633 8,781,061
25   9,585,536
26   1,275,317
27 7,523,611 4,586,760
28 20,789,227 6,573,871
29 1,434,431 11,335,871
30 3,082,160 6,154,953
31   4,108,810
Total 377,629,619 306,368,315
1 126,251 5,064,958
2 12,353,470  
3   5,248,687
4   2,882,736
5   3,818,439
6   2,400,609
7 9,073,475 3,108,738
8   3,997,862
9    
10 11,223,669 3,230,544
11 6,638,398 3,974,902
12 14,064,870 4,198,586
13 2,093,021 5,655,504
14 2,778,945 3,080,026
15   3,655,182
16    
17 6,695,934 2,969,217
18   4,282,684
19   1,722,268
20   2,191,086
21   1,677,176
22   4,185,852
23    
24   2,536,596
25   3,732,457
26   1,593,395
27   1,942,972
28   526,386
29   3,823,146
30    
Total 65,048,033 81,500,008
1   1,884,105
2    
3   3,873,332
4    
5   5,930,220
6   3,056,130
7    
8   679,185
9   3,052,077
10   2,163,072
11   1,094,600
12   4,259,580
13   4,070,271
14    
15    
16   4,048,328
17    
18   2,432,328
19   4,143,148
20   4,189,568
21    
22    
23   4,684,149
24    
25   2,698,168
26   4,849,096
27   3,748,592
28 16,947,416  
29 14,904,743 11,329,925
30   1,743,300
31   2,534,892
Total 31,852,159 76,464,129
1    
2 32,493,472 11,667,468
3   3,215,166
4    
5   3,216,114
6    
7   1,719,620
8   1,373,583
9   4,625,940
10   4,126,578
11    
12   1,977,576
13 6,989,092 1,269,023
14   2,286,200
15    
16   6,784,002
17   3,227,622
18    
19 15,934,175 4,753,633
20    
21   2,269,160
22   6,325,134
23 1,064,678 2,155,790
24   2,930,522
25    
26   1,983,339
27   1,611,558
28   2,286,285
29   4,680,120
30   2,056,160
Total 56,481,417 76,540,593
1   3,397,478
2    
3   1,075,590
4 1,533,348 4,157,032
5   4,399,616
6 484,858 2,060,154
7 279,836  
8   6,579,181
9 2,914,199  
10 3,957,643 2,296,262
11 18,741,544 3,134,486
12   7,004,954
13   3,535,920
14    
15   5,559,577
16 969,717  
17   1,726,272
18   3,418,751
19    
20   5,882,962
21   1,556,415
22   4,140,483
23    
24   3,237,318
25    
26   12,380,912
27   1,609,875
28   1,989,000
29   3,455,507
30 30,146,496 4,134,565
31   8,805,105
Total 59,027,641 95,537,415
Table VII. — Record of gaugings from April 1st to December 31st, 1894, of total volume of precipitation, and total volume of discharge from area drained by the Bienville Draining Machine; the area aggregating 2,170 acres.
1    
2   4,385,909
3   1,048,179
4   1,122,396
5 4,726,260 2,764,580
6   1,567,800
7   1,161,600
8    
9   1,770,312
10 6,695,535 3,869,648
11   1,576,800
12   1,276,800
13   1,107,651
14   1,054,625
15    
16   1,421,605
17   1,742,275
18   1,529,493
19   1,043,219
20   838,470
21   1,141,701
22    
23   1,875,819
24 18,905,040 10,569,660
25    
26 2,625,700 3,220,700
27   1,602,650
28   1,602,900
29 3,938,550 3,707,964
30   1,764,756
Total 36,891,085 51,765,512
1   1,625,481
2   1,183,446
3   1,080,770
4   1,055,805
5   1,243,464
6    
7   1,723,302
8   1,345,311
9   1,070,260
10   1,132,404
11   1,073,424
12 1,969,275 1,055,808
13 1,654,191  
14 6,144,138 6,328,037
15   981,618
16 1,181,565 1,068,914
17 1,417,878 2,760,070
18   1,520,264
19   1,104,026
20    
21   1,329,120
22   1,109,911
23   1,034,583
24 3,702,237 2,135,078
25   1,049,824
26   1,010,792
27    
28   1,201,860
29   1,577,340
30   981,708
31   1,004,112
Total 16,069,284 39,786,732
1   875,665
2   843,160
3    
4   1,264,592
5   1,255,176
6 3,623,466 973,086
7   2,010,159
8   955,974
9 2,205,588 2,521,114
10 5,986,596 2,464,770
11 9,452,520 9,385,500
12   586,080
13   1,197,616
14   1,361,156
15   1,000,034
16   1,002,140
17 2,914,527 1,443,572
18 2,284,359 2,348,837
19 3,465,924 2,746,720
20 2,363,130 2,379,000
21 630,168 1,788,800
22   1,513,720
23   1,558,845
24    
25   1,491,498
26   825,020
27   1,224,034
28   1,087,560
29   1,019,030
30   1,100,102
Total 32,926,278 48,174,960
1    
2 1,890,504 2,182,644
3 3,308,382 3,367,320
4 6,695,535 3,999,282
5 472,626 3,605,634
6 551,397 2,056,600
7 1,496,649 1,515,890
8 2,205,588  
9 1,575,420 2,625,600
10   1,613,105
11   1,395,122
12 315,084 1,004,805
13 945,252 1,341,360
14   5,207,892
15   1,414,400
16 4,962,573 8,341,210
17 236,313 2,365,720
18 5,277,657 4,736,160
19   1,643,390
20 630,168 1,435,378
21 7,877,100 6,057,912
22 3,938,850 2,571,075
23   2,812,026
24   1,512,195
25   1,577,532
26 787,710  
27 6,695,535 5,513,508
28 1,339,107 2,189,041
29    
30   3,016,116
31 78,771 1,446,939
Total 51,279,921 76,547,856
1   1,335,996
2 157,452 1,302,480
3 2,993,298 1,166,536
4 157,542 1,500,794
5    
6   1,547,250
7   1,516,671
8 630,168 1,122,136
9 1,654,191 1,532,700
10 2,599,443 2,472,600
11   2,245,100
12    
13 24,812,865 5,043,271
14 236,313 9,168,896
15 4,174,863 7,788,116
16 2,678,214 3,101,838
17 1,417,878 2,781,224
18 6,380,451 6,336,316
19   3,514,500
20   1,894,732
21 6,537,993 1,215,500
22 551,397 6,754,266
23   2,586,790
24 3,781,008 2,836,790
25   2,182,700
26    
27 1,732,962 2,195,320
28 3,859,779 1,503,310
29 315,084 3,861,054
30 157,452 2,137,100
31   1,558,700
Total 64,828,533 82,202,112
1   1,460,430
2 945,252  
3   2,054,392
4   1,297,620
5   1,300,050
6   1,141,764
7 787,710 1,230,718
8   1,227,340
9    
10 2,756,985 1,243,646
11 1,260,336 1,171,198
12 2,441,901 2,089,453
13 315,084 1,938,924
14 315,084º 1,515,105
15   1,287,018
16    
17 2,048,046 2,274,507
18   1,272,877
19   1,186,804
20   962,730
21   1,157,993
22   1,078,575
23    
24   1,554,888
25   1,184,625
26   1,025,786
27   1,021,282
28    
29   1,965,600
30    
Total 10,870,398 34,643,325
1   1,884,105
2    
3   2,281,544
4    
5   1,959,600
6   1,387,530
7    
8   679,185
9   1,844,505
10   2,163,072
11    
12    
13   3,049,002
14    
15    
16   2,785,898
17    
18   2,432,391
19    
20   2,388,204
21    
22    
23   2,912,085
24    
25   2,698,168
26    
27   2,466,936
28 1,181,565  
29 1,575,420 3,476,850
30   1,743,300
31   981,240
Total 2.756,985 37,133,615
1    
2 5,592,741 3,786,210
3   2,162,646
4    
5   2,244,834
6    
7   1,719,620
8   1,373,583
9    
10   2,223,378
11    
12   1,977,576
13    
14   2,286,200
15    
16   2,191,374
17   1,388,358
18    
19 3,229,611 2,747,161
20    
21   2,269,160
22    
23   2,155,790
24   1,347,822
25    
26   1,983,339
27    
28   2,286,285
29    
30   2,056,160
Total 8,822,352 36,199,496
1   1,465,290
2    
3   1,075,590
4 315,084 2,156,382
5    
6 78,771 2,060,154
7    
8   2,302,182
9 883,759  
10 708,939 2,296,262
11 2,914,527 1,005,660
12   1,772,928
13   1,678,300
14    
15   2,033,350
16 157,542  
17   1,726,272
18   1,675,485
19    
20   1,718,982
21   1,556,415
22   1,120,647
23    
24   1,990,044
25    
26   3,489,865
27   1,609,875
28    
29   2,315,907
30 4,805,031 1,926,405
31   2,057,598
Total 9,863,653 39,033,593
Table VIII.— Records of gaugings of volume of water discharged by the different draining machines, from September 28th to October 27th, or for forty consecutive days, during which no precipitation occurred.
September 18 1,518,678 1,272,877 1,491,129
September 19 535,464 1,186,804  
September 20 1,228,356 962,730  
September 21 519,183 1,157,993  
September 22 1,303,575 1,078,575 1,803,702
September 23      
September 24 981,708 1,554,888  
September 25 1,005,480 1,184,625 1,542,352
September 26 567,609 1,025,786  
September 27 921,690 1,021,282  
September 28 526,386    
September 29   1,965,600 1,857,546
September 30      
October 1   1,884,105  
October 2      
October 3   2,281,544 1,591,788
October 4      
October 5 3,970,620 1,959,600  
October 6   1,387,600 1,668,600
October 7      
October 8   679,185  
October 9   1,844,505 1,207,572
October 10   2,163,072  
October 11     1,094,600
October 12 4,259,580    
October 13   3,049,002 1,021,269
October 14      
October 15      
October 16   2,785,898 1,262,430
October 17      
October 18   2,432,391  
October 19 4,143,148    
October 20   2,388,204 1,801,364
October 21      
October 22      
October 23   2,912,085 1,772,064
October 24      
October 25   2,698,168  
October 26 4,849,096    
October 27   2,466,936 1,281,656
Total for 40 days 26,330,573 43,343,385 19,396,072
Total per day 658,264 1,083,584 484,902

Page updated: 19 Oct 13