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1802

This webpage reproduces a section of
The Journal

of
John Sevier

published in Vols. V and VI
of the Tennessee Historical Magazine,
1919‑1920

The text is in the public domain.

This page has been carefully proofread
and I believe it to be free of errors.
If you find a mistake though, please let me know!


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1804
This site is not affiliated with the US Military Academy.

John Sevier's Journal

Vol. VI
p35
January, 1803.

Wed. 5 . . . Memo. I settled my account for running the state line &c. to the amount of 375 dollars — have received from Markland 50 from Fisk 18 & received from Mr. Maddin 30 & have directed Tho. McCarry to apply to Mr. Martin for 28 & a half dollars making in the whole 126 & 1‑2 dollars. . . .

. . . . . .

[Memoranda]

To cure the pluricy & fluenzy when the pain and fever Begins you p36must take three spoonfuls of honey and as much alloycospane (?) as will lie on the point of case knife twice, and half that quantity of Indian turnips and as much allum as the size of a large pea & half as much fresh Butter as honey, Stew them on hot embers then every night take one table spoonful, very warm keep takeing that until the abscess breaks Make a small cake of Ry meal then split the Cake and put tar on it and lay it on the pain & follow the pain with a new Cake every four hours. take Garlic & pound it put it on hogs lard and keep that to the soals of the feet & blead moderately every three day & regularly & sweat every three Days with Sinicar snake root & keep body open with castor oil. . . .

. . . . . .

Cure for gravel half pint of common plantain seeds, boiled in one Quart of new milk down to one pint — take a spoonful morning & evening of the decoction.

. . . . . .

Cuckceld bur leaves boiled in new milk good for a snake bite. The gaul of the earth bruised and infused in new milk good.

. . . . . .

Blue Vitriol with half its Quantity of allum burnt into a powder put to a Cancer wart is good to eat it out, must be changed every six hours.

. . . . . .

April, 1803.

Sat. 9 Fine day. Sold unto John Southgate per his agent Tho. Emmerson165 5000 acres of land on Crane creek at 50 Cents per acre, 2115 on Duck River at 1 dollar, 1000 on Buffaloe River at 1 dollar, and 4000 on obias River for 3334 dollars the whole went to discharge a debt due unto the said Southgate from Michael Harrison for goods & merchandise he recd. at Norfolk, Virgia. I made deeds for the whole in the presence of Judge White the same day. Recd. from Mr. Wm. Martin 10 dollars.

. . . . . .

October, 1803.

Sat. 15 Set out for So. west Point in Company with And. Greer esqr & my son Washington. Lodged at John Woods.

Sun. 16 Sit out early and arrived at Kingston & arrived to Breakfastº after having a violent dispute with J.º Jackson166 — lodged at Jesse Birds Had this day a salute of sixteen rounds by the garrison. Dined with Col. Meigs167 in the garrison.

Mon. 17 Went with the agent of the Indian affairs, Majr. MacRea & others to the Council House on the south side of Tennessee River to hold a conference with the Cherokee chiefs concerning a road and other matters. Our talks were delivered and the Indians required time to give their answer. Adj. till next day (Dined with Majr. MacRae)

p37 Tues. 18 last night lodged with Thos. N. Clark Met according to the adjournment — The Indians after some conversation observed they were not prepared to give their answer & we then adjourned till the next morning — dind with Colo. Meigs.

Wed. 19 we met again and the Indians then give in their answer & consented to let the United States Cut a Road through their country into the State of Georgia, etc. . . .

December, 1803.

A Dream.

Tues. 10

Curious dream. I dreamed my Father came descending in the air in what appeared at first like a cloud As it came nearer it assumed the appearance of one of the finest rigged vessels I ever had seen that the sail roaps and everything of the apparatus appeared Richer & of superior quality to anything I had ever seen. He came out of the vessel when it had halted or alighted and told me that on the Fryday before New Years day he had sit out to the Great high Court, — I asked him if theer was any news where he had been he answered that nothing existed there but the utmost peace and friendship, that he had heard much conversation respecting the Quarel between Judge Jackson & myself, — I then asked him if it was possible that affair had reached so far? He then replied that long before he had arrived the news was there and also every other transaction that has taken place in Tennessee — I then asked him what was said? He told me that Jackson was by all viewed as a very wicked base man, and a very improper person for a judge, and said I have it in charge to intimate to you either by dream or some other mode, that you have nothing to fear provided you act a prudent part for they are all your friends — on his saying by a dream I began to think I was dreaming & immediately awaked.

Mr. William Macklin Secy came to my house tarried all night & told him and the family my dream on Wednesday morning. . . .

Sat. 14 Was informed by Majr. James Doherty of Hephaestus, that my father was dead168 . . .


The Editor's Notes:

165 Thomas Emmerson, judge of the Superior Court, 1807‑1809; judge of the Supreme Court, 1819‑1822; circuit judge, 1816‑1819; first mayor of Knoxville; editor of "Washington Republican and Farmer's Journal," an anti-Jackson paper published at Jonesboro, 1832‑1837.

[decorative delimiter]

166 It is well known that Andrew Jackson and John Sevier had a violent altercation in the "big road" between Kingston and Knoxville. Brave men do not have to fight for reputation. Sevier and Jackson took it out in words — what Homer called "winged words." D.

In the previous month — September, 1803 — Sevier had been inaugurated as governor for the fourth time.

[decorative delimiter]

167 Return J. Meigs was Indian agent.

[decorative delimiter]

168 Valentine Sevier died at the age of one hundred.


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