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Bill Thayer

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The Bonapartes in America
by
Clarence Edward Macartney and Gordon Dorrance

9

Jerome Bonaparte and Elizabeth Patterson

17

Descendants of Jerome and Elizabeth

43

Charles Joseph Bonaparte

53

Joseph Bonaparte at Bordentown

79

Joseph and Lake Bonaparte

111

The Murats

125

Napoleon III

146

Napoleon III and the Mexican Crisis

178

The Napoleonic Exiles in Alabama

193

Texas and Champ d'Asile

202

Marshal Ney and North Carolina

216

Napoleon and the Louisiana Purchase

230

Napoleon's American Son

235

American Plots to Rescue Napoleon

241
273
275

Table of Illustrations

First Consul Bonaparte

Frontispiece

Jerome Bonaparte

26

Elizabeth Patterson

38

Lieutenant Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte, U. S. A.

48

Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte of New York

48

Charles J. Bonaparte

64

Joseph Bonaparte

82

Joseph's Philadelphia Home

90

The First "Point Breeze"

108

Lake Bonaparte

108

The Present "Point Breeze"

184º

"Bonaparte Park"

184º

Prince Achille Murat

136

Princess Achille Murat

136

Napoleon III

174

Letizia Bonaparte

196

Champ d'Asile Monument

210

John Gordon Bonaparte

238

The Napoleon House, New Orleans

264
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Technical Details

Edition Used

The edition used in this transcription was that of Dorrance & Company, Inc., 1939. The book is now in the public domain because the copyright was not renewed in the appropriate year (1966 or 1967): details here on the copyright law involved.

Pagination and Local Links

For citation and indexing purposes, the pagination is shown in the right margin of the text at the page turns (like at the end of this line);p57 these are also local anchors. Sticklers for total accuracy will of course find the anchor at its exact place in the sourcecode.

In addition, I've inserted a number of other local anchors: whatever links might be required to accommodate the authors' own cross-references, as well as a few others for my own purposes. If in turn you have a website and would like to target a link to some specific passage of the text, please let me know: I'll be glad to insert a local anchor there as well.

Proofreading

As almost always, I retyped the text by hand rather than scanning it — not only to minimize errors prior to proofreading, but as an opportunity for me to become intimately familiar with the work, an exercise which I heartily recommend: Qui scribit, bis legit. (Well-meaning attempts to get me to scan text, if successful, would merely turn me into some kind of machine: gambit declined.)

My transcription has been minutely proofread. In the table of contents above, the sections are shown on blue backgrounds, indicating that I believe the text of them to be completely errorfree. As elsewhere on this site, the header bar at the top of each chapter's webpage will remind you with the same color scheme.

The printed book was well proofread; a few typographical errors — usually in French words and proper nouns — are marked, when important, with a bullet like this;º and when trivial, with a dotted underscore like this: as elsewhere on my site, glide your cursor over the bullet or the underscored words to read the variant. Similarly, bullets before measurements provide conversions to metric, e.g., 10 miles.

A number of odd spellings, curious turns of phrase, etc. have been marked <!‑‑ sic ‑‑> in the sourcecode, just to confirm that they were checked.

Any other mistakes, please drop me a line, of course: especially if you have a copy of the printed book in front of you.

Accents

The authors seem to have taken a formal stance against accents and cedillas; it seemed so intentional that I respected it, except in the rare cases where they themselves use an accent and it's the wrong one; and in the titles of published material as well as in the names of authors in the Bibliography.



[image ALT: An escutcheon on a background of stylized waves. The escutcheon bears the following arms: gules two bends sinister or between two mullets of the second. The image serves as the icon on this site for the book 'The Bonapartes in America'.]

The icon I use to indicate this subsite is a heraldic montage of my own, taking a cue from the binding of my copy of the book, on which a coat of arms appears. On investigation, it turned out to belong to a branch of the Bonaparte family, but the wrong one: that of the emperor's father is mirrorwise reversed. Now the family escutcheon is nowhere mentioned in this book, but using a single coat of arms to represent all these very diverse people seemed an excellent idea, so I took the correct arms and added waves — thirteen, in the blue of the American flag — for the ocean crossed. If the motto of the city of Paris comes to mind: fluctuat nec mergitur, in which she sees herself as floating, not sinking; that too seems appropriate.


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Site updated: 26 Feb 13