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This webpage reproduces an appendix to
A History of Armenia

by Vahan M. Kurkjian

published by the
Armenian General Benevolent Union of America
1958

The text is in the public domain.

This page has been carefully proofread
and I believe it to be free of errors.
If you find a mistake though,
please let me know!

p501 Chronologya

Legendary Data

Patriarchs
2100‑1770 B.C.
1. Haik, 2350 B.C.
2. Armenak
3. Armais
4. Amassia
5. Gegham
6. Harma
7. Aram
1770‑1440 B.C.
8. Ara the Handsome
9. Ara Araian, or Kardos
10. Anoushavan
11. Paret
12. Arbak
13. Zavan
14. Pharnas
15. Sour
1400‑1200 B.C.
16. Havanak
17. Vashtak
18. Haikak
19. Ampak
20. Arnak
21. Shavarsh
22. Norair
23. Vestam
24. Kar
25. Gorak
26. Hrant
27. Endzak
28. Geghak
1200‑800 B.C.
29. Horo
30. Zarmair
31. Perch
32. Arboun
33. Bazouk
34. Hoy
35. Houssak
36. Kaipak
37. Skaiordi
Kings
800‑330 B.C.
1. Parouyr
2. Hratchia
3. Pharnouas
4. Pachouych
5. Kornak
6. Phavos
7. Haikak II
8. Erouand I
9. Tigran I
10. Vahagn
11. Aravan
12. Nerseh
13. Zareh
14. Armog
15. Bagam
16. Van
17. Vahé

(None of the above dates should be taken into consideration)

p502 Historical Data

Earliest times

Arrival of the Armeno-Phrygians in Thrace ?
Crossing of the Bosphorus by the Armeno-Phrygians ca. 1250 B.C.
Settlement of the Armeno-Phrygians in Phrygia 1000 (?)
The Armenians separate from the Phrygians ca. 800
Occupation of the Ararat region ca. 600
Median rule (Cyaxares) ca. 590‑550
Achaemenidº Rule of Persia ca. 550‑330
Macedonian Rule ca. 330‑315 (?)

First Period of Independence

1. Neoptolemus seizes Armenia 323 B.C.
2. Orontes I or Erouand 322‑301
3. Ardoates (= Artavazd, or Orontes-Erouand) 301
4. Artavazanes or Artavaz 243‑220 (?)
5. Orontes II 220 (?)‑215 (?)

Rule of the Seleucids 215 (?)‑190 B.C.

Second Period of Independence

Artasheshian Dynasty (Dynasty of Artaxias)

1. Artaxias or Artashes I 190‑159 (?) B.C.
2. Artavazd I 159(?)‑149
3. Tigran I or Tiran 149‑123
4. Tigran II, the Great 94‑54 B.C.
5. Artavazd II 55‑34
6. Alexander 34‑31
7. Artashes II 30‑20
8. Tigran III 20 B.C. - ca. 8 A.D.º
9. Tigran IV/Erato 8‑5 A.D.º
10. Artavazd III 5‑2 A.D.º
11. Tigran IV and Erato (Second time) 2‑1 A.D.º

p503 Foreign Kings

1. Ariobarzan (Median) A.D. 2‑4
2. Artavazd IV (Median) 4‑6
3. Tigran V (Jewish)
Erato (again)
6‑14
14‑15
4. Vonon (Parthian) 16‑17
5. Artashes III or Zeno (Roman) 18‑34
6. Arshak I (Parthian) 34‑35
7. Mithridates (Georgian) 35‑37 and 47‑51
8. Hradamizd (Georgian) 51‑53

Armenian Arsacids

1. Trdat I (Parthian) 52‑59 and 66‑75
2. Tigran VI 60‑61
3. Asxadar (Exedares) 100‑113
4. Parthamasiris 113‑114
5. Parthamaspates 116‑117
6. Vologases or Vagharsh I 117‑140
7. Sohemus 140‑162
8. Pacorus 162‑163
9. Sohemus (again) 164‑185
10. Vagharsh II 185‑190
11. Khosrov I 190‑216
12. Trdat II or Khosrov II, the Great 216‑238
End of Parthian Kingdom A.D. 226
Sassanid Dynasty founded in Persia A.D. 226
13.º Trdat III 287‑294 and 297‑300
Conversion of Armenia to Christianity ca. 305
14. Artavazd V 252‑261º
Palmyrian Rule 261‑272
15. Khosrov III (Kotak, "the short") 331‑339
16. Tiran 340‑350
17. Arshak II 350‑367
18. Pap 367‑374
p504 19. Varazdat 374‑378
20. Arshak III 378‑389
21. Vagharshak (Valarsas) 378‑386
Division of Armenia between the Romans and the Persians 387 A.D.
22. Khosrov IV 385‑387 A.D.
23. Vramshapuh 387‑414
Invention of the Armenian alphabet A.D. 404
24. Khosrov IV (restored) 415
25. Shahpur 416‑420
Interregnum, Persian rule 420‑423
26. Artashes 423‑428
End of Arsacid Dynasty in Armenia A.D. 428

Persian Rule (430‑634)

Marzpans or Governors-General

In all 35 Marzpans, of which 29 Persians and 6 Armenians.

Vardan the Great, d. 451 (Battle of Avarair).

Fall of the Persian Empire A.D. 652.

Governors-General of Byzantine Armenia

12 Governors succeeded each other from 591‑705

The Arabs break into Armenia, A.D. 640.

Arab Domination

Ostikans or Governors-General

26 Ostikans are listed for this period running from 654‑851.

Third Period of Independence

Dynasty of the Armenian Bagratids

1. Ashot I 885‑890 A.D.
2. Sembat I 890‑914
3. Ashot II, "of Iron" 914‑929
Ashot, the Usurper 921
p505 4. Abas 929‑953
5. Ashot III, "the Merciful" 953‑977
6. Sembat II, the Conqueror 977‑989
7. Gagik I (Shahenshah) 989‑1020
8. Sembat III or Hovhannes Sembat 1020‑1042
9. Ashot IV 1020‑1042
10. Gagik II (died 1079 at Cyzistra). 1042‑1045

Kingdom of Vaspurakan (Ardzruni)

1. Khatchik-Gagik 914‑937
2. Derenik-Ashot 937‑953
3. Abousahl-Hamazasp 953‑972
4. Ashot-Sahak 972‑983
5. Gourgen-Khatchik 983‑1003
6. Seneqerim-Hovannes 1003, died 1026
7. David, at Sivas 1027‑1037
8. Atom, at Sivas 1037‑1080
9. Abousahl, at Sivas 1037‑1080

Kingdom of Kars

1. Mushegh 962‑984
2. Abas 984‑989
3. Gagik, d. in Greece 1080 1029‑1064

Kingdom of Armenian Albania

1. David d. 1046
2. Koriké 1046‑1082

p506 Fourth Period of Independence

Dynasty of the Roupenians in New Armenia (Cilicia)

1. Barons

1. Roupen I 1080‑1095
2. Constantine I 1095‑1099
3. Thoros I 1099‑1129
4. Leon I, d. 1141 in Constantinople 1129‑1137
Rule of the Byzantines 1137‑1145
5. Thoros II 1145‑1169
6. Mleh 1170‑1175
7. Roupen II 1175‑1187
8. Leon II
then as King Leon I
1187‑1196
1196‑1219

2. Kings

1. Leon I 1196 (crowned 1199)‑1219
2. Queen Zabel
Philip
1219‑1252
1222‑1225
3. Hetoum I 1226‑1270
4. Leon II 1270‑1289
5. Hetoum II 1289‑1297
6. Thoros 1293‑1295
7. Sembat 1296‑1298
8. Constantin I 1298‑1299
9. Leon III 1301‑1307
10. Oshin 1308‑1320
11. Leon IV 1320‑1342
12. Guy de Lusignan or Constantin II 1342‑1344
13. Constantin III 1344‑1363
Leon the Usurper 1363‑1365
14. Constantin IV 1365‑1373
15. Leon V, died in Paris, 1393. 1374‑1375

Thayer's Note:

a Chronology: In view of the disorder in some of the dates, especially, a reminder is in order. This page has been attentively proofread and faithfully reproduces the text of the 1964 print edition. Major chronological uncertainties and scholarly differences of opinion make it impossible for anyone to determine what the author may have intended, all the more so that he indicated no source for the chronology; but since the tables include some manifest impossibilities, other less obvious errors may legitimately be suspected as well, and the reader is advised to tread carefully.


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Page updated: 24 Jan 05