[image ALT: Much of my site will be useless to you if you've got the images turned off!]
mail:
Bill Thayer

[image ALT: Cliccare qui per una pagina di aiuto in Italiano.]
Italiano

[Link to a series of help pages]
Help
[Link to the next level up]
Up
[Link to my homepage]
Home

[image ALT: link to previous section]
previous
Chapter
This webpage reproduces a chapter of
Archaeological Handbook
of the County of Gloucester

by George Witts

published by G. Norman, Clarence Street
Cheltenham, n. d. (1883)

The text is in the public domain.

This text has been carefully proofread
and I believe it to be free of errors.
If you find a mistake though,
please let me know!


[image ALT: link to next section]
next
Chapter

Archaeological Handbook of Gloucestershire

p95 ROUND BARROWS

The Round Barrows of Gloucestershire are very numerous, but so few of them have been examined that it is impossible to give an accurate account of many of them. I propose, therefore, firstly, to speak of those which have been described in other works, and then to give a list of many more hitherto unnoticed, without regard to their alphabetical order.

No. 1. — Bownhill

This lies close to the long barrow above the village of Woodchester, three miles south-west of Stroud, and two miles north-west of Nailsworth. It was 60 feet in diameter, but has now been ploughed down.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p278.

No. 2

This is in a field near the Windmill, on Minchinhampton Common, two miles south of Stroud. It was 60 feet in diameter, but has nearly been obliterated. The only articles found during the examination were an iron ring and a few fragments of bronze.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p283.

No. 3

This stands above the village of Hyde, three miles south-east of Stroud. It was 65 feet in diameter when examined, and only 30 inches in height, having been much levelled by the plough. In the centre of this was a circular excavation in the original soil, five feet in diameter and ten inches deep. The p96sides of this depression were protected by stones placed on edge. It was filled with burnt earth and contained fragments of burnt bones, some rude pottery, pebbles, a small piece of bronze, and a leaf-shaped arrow-head of flint.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p283.

No. 4

In Gatcombe Wood, one mile south-east of Minchinhampton village. This is 35 feet in diameter and two feet high.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p278.

No. 5. — The Oven

This is situated in Avening Copse, half a mile west of the village of Avening, and one and a half miles south of Minchinhampton. It is 50 feet in diameter and five feet high. Charcoal and ashes were found scattered on the original surface, and in the centre of the mound a handful of burnt human bones and two worked flints were found.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p281.

No. 6

In Hazlewood, one mile south-east of Nailsworth. It is 75 feet in diameter, and three feet high.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p278.

No. 7

Near Hazlewood Copse, one mile south-east of Nailsworth. It was 67 feet in diameter, but is now ploughed down.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p278.

No. 8. — Lechmore

This lies a few hundred yards south of the Lechmore long barrow, one and a half miles south of Nailsworth. It was 45 feet in diameter, and five feet high. The top of the mound consisted of stone and rubble 18 inches in depth, the bottom portion being fine mould. In this fine mould no less than 80 p97flints were discovered, 4 pieces of pottery ornamented with a pattern of dotted lines, and some teeth of oxen. Exactly in the centre of the barrow was a hole 8 inches deep, containing some burnt human bones.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p278.

No. 9

Near Chavenage Green, two and a half miles south-east of Nailsworth. It was about 60 feet in diameter, but is now ploughed down. The primary interment contained charcoal, burnt bones, small pieces of pottery, and a well-worked flint javelin point. In the secondary interment, discovered in 1847, were found iron spear-heads, bronze fibulae, silver ear-rings, and stone, clay, and amber beads.

See "Journal Archae. Assoc.," vol. IV, p50.

Also "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p282.

No. 10

This is also near Chavenage Green, 100 yards distant from the last. It was 60 feet in diameter.

See "Journal Archae. Assoc.," vol. IV, p50.

Also "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p282.

No. 11. — Horsley Wood Tumulus

This lies one mile from Horsley, and two miles south-west of Nailsworth. It was 52 feet in diameter, and three feet six inches high. A heap of ashes and burnt human bones were found in the centre on a level with the original surface; one piece of pottery and two teeth of an ox were also found.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p284.

No. 12. — The Hyde Tumulus

This lies three miles south-east of Stroud. Though not circular it has no connection with long barrows, and is therefore inserted here. It is 80 feet long, 60 feet wide, its height being 10 feet, and its direction east by north and west by south. This is probably of much later date than the other tumuli, either p98round or long; probably it was of Roman origin. It was opened in 1848, when a chamber was discovered enclosed by large stones. In this were found burnt bones and ashes, also a bronze fibula of Roman type.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p284.

No. 13. — Dry Heathfield Tumulus

Situated two miles south of Cheltenham. It was opened in 1860, and measured 60 feet in diameter. There was a chamber in the centre 6 feet long, 2 feet wide, and 2 feet deep, the sides and ends of which were formed of neat dry walling of Stonesfield slate. In this were found the remains of at least seven skeletons. The barrow had, however, been disturbed on some previous occasion.

See "Anthropological Review," vol. III, p68.

Also "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. VI, p334.

No. 14. — Foxcote Tumulus

This lies on the top of the hill, one mile south of Dowdeswell, and four miles south-east of Cheltenham. It consists of loose stones, and measures from north to south 78 feet, and from east to west 69 feet, its height being eight feet. There was a dry wall built across the barrow, and near the centre was a chamber formed of flat stones placed on their edges and covered with stones two feet square; in this chamber were found the remains of one skeleton (a female). Fourteen flint flakes were also found with burnt stones, earth, and bones. Between 300 and 400 Roman coins were found in the black earth near the surface.

See "Anthropological Review," vol. III, p69.

Also "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. V, p335.

Nos. 15, 16, and 17

Three round barrows were opened many years ago on Cleeve Hill, beyond the racing stables, four miles north-east of Cheltenham. They all contained human bones.

See Rudder's "History of Gloucestershire," p369.

Also "Anthrop. Review," vol. III, p70.

p99 No. 18

This lies half a mile south-west of Snowshill village and two and a half miles south of Broadway. It was examined in January, 1881. It is 66 feet in diameter and five feet six inches high, but previous to the examination it had been much reduced in height by the plough, and now has been obliterated. There was a chamber in the centre, four feet long, three feet wide, and two feet six inches high, formed of large slabs of stone; in this were found a number of human bones and several portions of a skull, much broken; also a bronze spear-head with socket, nine and a half inches long; a bronze pin, six and a half inches long, with a cutting edge at one end and a hammer at the other; this is a beautifully worked implement, and has a hole through the centre for a handle.

Nos. 19 and 20

There are two other round barrows in the same field as the last. Both have evidently been opened at some time, but unfortunately no record has been kept of their contents.

No. 21

This lies three-quarters of a mile north of the last, two miles south of Broadway. It was opened many years ago, when bronze spear-heads and other articles were discovered, but I have been unable to get any information as to their character.

No. 22

This lies in the parish of Cubberley, to the north of Cowley Manor, fur miles south of Cheltenham. It consisted of a mound of earth and stones, no chamber being present. A skeleton was discovered in the centre in a sitting posture, and with it some flint flakes and round balls of sun-dried clay; the skull, which was sent to the Ethnological Society, appears p100to have been of the dolicho-cephalic type, similar to those found in long barrows. A flint from this barrow is in the Cheltenham College Museum.

See "Proceedings Cott. Nat. Field Club," vol. VI, p332.

No. 23. — The Crippetts' Round Barrow

This lies a few hundred yards south of the Crippett's Long Barrow, three miles south of Cheltenham.

Nos. 24, 25, and 26

These are three interesting barrows near the "Air Balloon," four miles south of Cheltenham. They lie in a coppice on the south side of the road leading from Cheltenham to Birdlip. One of these is about fourteen feet high, and has a circular depression in the centre; the others are very small, lying near to it.

No. 27

In a field in the parish of Cranham, one and a half miles south-west of Birdlip, a barrow was opened by Mr. Dorington, and inspected by the County Archaeological Society, in July, 1880. It has two walls forming a passage through the centre. Two skeletons were found imbedded in burnt masses of lime and stone; the burnt mass was eighteen inches in thickness, with the skeletons in the middle of it. Professor Rolleston pronounced this barrow one of the oldest forms of round tumuli, being a transition one between the long and round.

See "Transactions Bristol and Glou. Archae. Soc.," vol. V, p133.

Nos. 28 and 29

Both these are situated near the above, between Hazel Hunger Wood and Foster's Ash, one and a half miles south-west of the village of Brimpsfield.

No. 30

Within the intrenchment of Saintbury Camp, two miles north-west of Broadway. Diameter, forty feet; Height, four feet.

p101 No. 31

On Scarborough Farm, in the parish of Cutsdean, half a mile to the east of Buggilde Street. Diameter, sixty feet; Height, five feet.

No. 32

One mile east of the village of Temple Guiting, adjoining the ancient Buggilde Street. Diameter, sixty-five feet; height, five feet.

Nos. 33, 34, 35, and 36

On Benborough farm, in the parish of Temple Guiting, five miles north-west of Bourton-on‑the‑Water. Diameter of the first, sixty-six feet; height, four feet six inches. Diameter of the second, fifty feet; Height, two feet. The remaining ones were removed a few years ago.

No. 37. — Nose Hill Barrow

By the side of Buggilde Street, one and a half miles north of the village of Naunton. Diameter, seventy-five feet; Height, four feet.

No. 38

In Kineton Thorns, two miles north of Naunton. Diameter, thirty-three feet; Height, three feet.

Nos. 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, and 46

On Cow Common, in the parish of Lower Swell, two and a half miles from the village. These lie in the same field as Swell Long Barrow No. 1, and were examined by Canon Greenwell and Professor Rolleston.

See "British Barrows," p445, &c.

No. 47. — Alcots Barrow

Half a mile south of the village of Condicote. (This name occurs in Codex Diplomaticus.) Diameter, ninety feet; Height, three feet six inches.

p102 Nos. 48 and 49

These are twin barrows, known as Pegler's Knobb, one mile north-west of Upper Swell village, and two miles from Stow-on‑the‑Wold.

Nos. 50 and 51

These lie one mile north-west of Longborough and three and a half miles from Stow-on‑the‑Wold, near the Stow and Broadway Road. Diameter of the first, eighty feet; Height, nine feet.

No. 52

Three-quarters of a mile south-west of Longborough, near the entrance gates of Banksfee House.

No. 53

Close to Little Ganborough, two miles north-west of Stow-on‑the‑Wold.

No. 54

Half a mile south-west of Donnington village, and one and a half miles from Stow-on‑the‑Wold.

No. 55. — Picked Morden

Two miles west of Lower Swell, and three miles from Stow-on‑the‑Wold. Diameter, eighty-six feet; Height, eight feet.

No. 56

Half a mile west of Lower Swell.

No. 57

A barrow was opened at Oddington, two miles east of Stow-on‑the‑Wold, in 1787. It was formed of layers of stones, and contained the bones of at least six skeletons, perforated beads of blue, red, and green, a fibula of copper, the centre of a shield, and spear-heads.

See Fosbrooke's "History of Gloucestershire," p406.

Also King's "Munimenta Antiqua," vol. I, p312.

p103 Nos. 58 and 59

On Hethel Farm, near the Foss Way, three-quarters of a mile south-west of Stow Station.

No. 60. — Wagborough

On the side of Buggilde Street, in the parish of Upper Slaughter, one and a half miles north-west of Bourton-on‑the‑Water. Diameter, forty-eight feet; Height, six feet.

No. 61. — Wyck Beacon

On the east of the road from Stow-on‑the‑Wold to Burford, one mile north-east of Little Rissington village.

No. 62

On Bourton Hill Farm, one mile south of Bourton-on‑the‑Water.

No. 63

On Clapton Hill, three-quarters of a mile north-east of Clapton village, and one and a half miles south of Bourton-on‑the‑Water.

Nos. 64, 65 and 66

These are three barrows on Leygore Farm, one mile south-east of Turkdean village, and one and a half miles north of Northleach.

No. 67

Near Under Camp Farm, in the parish of Farmington, half a mile north-east of the village.

No. 68

Just outside Norbury Camp, in the parish of Farmington, one mile north-east of Northleach.

No. 69

On the west side of the Salt Way, three-quarters of a mile south-west of Salperton village, on a very high part of the Cotswold Hills, in the same field as Salperton Camp.

p104 No. 70

On the farm known as Soundborough, three-quarters of a mile south of Sevenhampton, near the Banbury and Cheltenham Railway.

Nos. 71 and 72

Within the intrenchments of Oxenton Hill Camp, six miles north of Cheltenham.

No. 73

At the top of Lienover Wood, three and a half miles south-east of Cheltenham.

No. 74

On the top of Leckhampton Hill, on the east side of the principal fortification of the camp. It is very peculiar in form, the plan of it being nearly square, measuring thirty-five feet in each direction, and four feet high. It is defended by a mound two feet six inches high running all round it. Portions of human skeletons have lately been discovered in the centre.

No. 75

Chedworth Beacon, between the villages of Chedworth and Colesborne, one mile north-west of the former.

No. 76

Half a mile north of the last, above Chedworth Woods, one mile south-west of the Chedworth Roman Villa.

No. 77

On the high ground above Rendcomb Old Park, one mile south-west of the village of Rendcomb.

No. 78

In Miserden Park, two and a quarter miles south of Brimpsfield village.

p105 No. 79. — Jack Barrow

This stood on high ground between Duntisbourne Abbots and Edgeworth, but has been entirely removed, and a rickyard is now to be found on its site. The skeletons found were removed to Daglingworth Churchyard, and a stone erected over them to tell their history.

No. 80

In the parish of Duntisbourne Abbots, near to the Duntisbourne Long Barrow. Diameter, thirty-five feet; Height, four feet.

No. 81

Also in the parish of Duntisbourne Abbots, close to the last; now nearly obliterated by the plough.

No. 82. — Money Tump [SO 903 048]

In the parish of Bisley, three-quarters of a mile south of the village. Diameter, seventy feet; height, four feet six inches. Many worked flints have been found in its immediate neighbourhood.

Website(s):

The Modern Antiquarian

Nos. 83 and 84

These lie between "Money Tump" and Lypiatt Park, a quarter of a mile west of the former.

No. 85

On the top of the hill above Standish Park, three-quarters of a mile south-east of Haresfield Camp. Diameter, fifty feet; Height, eight feet.

No. 86

Within 200 yards of the last named. Diameter, thirty feet; Height, eight feet.

No. 87. — Haresfield Beacon

Within the intrenchments of Haresfield Camp, six miles south of Gloucester.

p106 No. 88

On the summit of Randwick Hill, two miles north-west of Stroud, 200 yards north-east of the Randwick Long Barrow, and within the intrenchments of Randwick Camp. Diameter, thirty-two feet; Height, four feet.

No. 89

This lies twenty-four feet south of the last. Diameter, twenty-seven feet; height, three feet.

No. 90

On Symonds Hall Hill, two miles south-east of Dursley.

Nos. 91 and 92

On Symonds Hall Farm, two and a half miles south-east of Dursley.

No. 93

In the parish of Lasborough, close to the village, four miles east of Wotton-under‑Edge.

Nos. 94 and 95

On Wortley Hill, one mile east of Wotton-under‑Edge.

No. 96

One mile south-west of the village of Boxwell, and two and a half miles from Wotton-under‑Edge.

Nos. 97 and 98

Near Knightsgrove, two miles south-west of the village of Leighterton.

No. 99

One mile north of Oldbury-on‑the‑Hill.

No. 100

Near Bowldown Wood, one and a half miles north-east of Leigherton village.

p107 No. 101

Near the road from Bath to Stroud, one mile north-west of Oldbury-on‑the‑Hill.

Nos. 102, 103, and 104

Near the same road as the last, and lying due west of Oldbury-on‑the‑Hill.

No. 105

Near Crickstone Farm, one and a quarter miles north-west of Badmington, and the same distance north-east of Sodbury Camp.

Nos. 106, 107, and 108

One mile south-east of Tormarton, on the borders of Gloucestershire and Wiltshire.

No. 109

One mile south of Tormarton and close to Hebdown Camp.

No. 110

On Marshfield Down, one mile north-east of Marshfield.

Nos. 111 and 112

In Wiltshire, one and a half miles east of Badmington, near Alderton.

No. 113

One and a half miles south of Alderley.

No. 114

Near North Stoke, two miles east of Bitton.

No. 115

Close to the village of Bitton, a little to the west of the Camp.

No. 116

In Over Park, one and a half miles south-west of Almondsbury, and one mile from Knole Park Camp.

p108 Nos. 117 and 118

Near the Ship Inn, one mile and a quarter south of Thornbury.

No. 119

On Tidenham Chase, one and a half miles north-east of Chepstow.

No. 120

One mile from Blakeney and two miles out of Newnham.

No. 121. — Waste Tumulus

Near Brockhampton, five miles east of Cheltenham. It was sixty feet in diameter. Near the centre was a chamber formed by flat stones and dry walling, eighteen inches deep, eight feet long, and two feet wide. It contained seven skeletons, and was covered over with rough stones, in the form of a roof. Several flint flakes were found during the excavations.

See "Anthrop. Review," vol. III, p69.

Nos. 122, 123, 124, 125, and 126

The remains of four other tumuli were discovered in the same field as the last, and another about 100 yards to the south, apparently undisturbed.

See "Anthrop. Review," vol. III, p69.

end of round barrows


[image ALT: Valid HTML 4.01.]

Page updated: 30 Dec 08