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p214 Aedes Fortunae in Foro Boario

Article on pp214‑215 of

Samuel Ball Platner (as completed and revised by Thomas Ashby):
A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome,
London: Oxford University Press, 1929.

Fortuna, Aedes: a temple of Fortuna in the forum Boarium ascribed by tradition to Servius Tullius (Liv. XXXIII.27; Dionys. IV.27: νεὼς Τύχης). It was burned in 213 B.C. (Liv. XXIV.47; Ovid. Fast. VI.625)1 and restored by a special commission (Liv. XXV.7) at the same time as the temple of Mater Matuta (q.v.). The day of dedication was the same (11th June; v. Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 99). It contained an archaic gilded wooden statue, which was not injured when the temple was burned (Ov. loc. cit.; p215Val. Max. I.8.11; Dionys. IV.40). This statue was draped with two togas (Ov. Fast. VI.570), variously called undulatae (Varro ap. Non. 189), praetextae (Plin. NH VIII.197), and regia undulata (ib. 194), so that its identity was in dispute. Some believed it to be a statue of Servius, others that of the goddess (Ov. Fast. VI.571; Varro, Pliny, Dionysius, Val. Maximus, locc. citt.; Cass. Dio LVIII.7; for the later history of this statue, see Fortuna Seiani, and cf.  Pudicitia Patricia and Rosch. III.3274‑3275; Wissowa, Ges. Abh. 254‑60.

The temple stood inside the porta Carmentalis (Liv. XXV.7; cf. Mél. 1909, 123‑127), and has sometimes been identified with the temple which has been converted into the church of S. Maria Egiziaca (for a complete description of which, see Mater Matuta). If this is the case, which seems far from certain, the temple must have been entirely restored about the middle of the first century B.C., to which period the construction seems to point (Jord. I.2.484; Rosch. I.1509‑1510; RE VII.19‑20).


The Authors' Note:

1 It is called templum in both passages.


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