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p546 V

The entries on pp546‑584

Samuel Ball Platner (as completed and revised by Thomas Ashby):
A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome,
London: Oxford University Press, 1929.

Vallis Egeriae: see Camenae.

Vallis Murcia: see Murcia.

Vallis Vaticana: a name occurring only once (Tac. Ann. XIV.14: clausum valle Vaticana spatium in quo equos regeret), which seems to mean the low ground between the Tiber and the mons Vaticanus (see Vaticanus (4), near the present Vatican.

(pp547‑548) Vaticanus: see separate page.

(p549) Veiovis, aedes: see separate page.

(p550) Velabrum: see separate page.

Velia: see separate page.

p551 Venerenses: see Vicus Veneris Almae.

Venus, aedes: see separate page.

Venus Calva, templum: see separate page.

Venus Cloacina: see Cloacina, sacrum.

(p552) Venus Erucina, aedes: see separate page.

Venus Felix, aedes: see separate page.

Venus Genetrix: see Forum Iulium.

Venus Hortorum Sallustianorum, aedes: see separate page.

Venus in Palatio: see Ἀφροδίσιον.

Venus (Libitina), templum: see separate page.

Venus Obsequens, aedes: see separate page.

(pp553‑554) Venus et Roma, templum: see separate page.

(p555) Venus Verticordia, aedes: see separate page.

Venus Victrix, aedes: see separate page.

Verminus, ara: an altar of the deity of the disease of vermina in cattle, found in 1876 just north of the porta Viminalis, during the removal of p556part of the Servian agger. The altar was erected in the first century B.C. by the duumvir A. Postumius, in accordance with a lex Plaetoria (CIL I2.804 = VI.31057). It is now in the Museo Mussolini on the Capitol, is 0.75 metre square and 1.03 high, and resembles in shape that of Aius Locutius (q.v.) on the Palatine (WR 55; BC 1876, 24‑28; OJ 1903, 142; Lanciani, Ancient Rome, 52; HF 1043; Bocconi, Mus. Cap. 289.1).

Vertumnus: see Vortumnus.

Divus Vespasianus, templum: see separate page.

Vesta, aedicula: see Atrium Vestae.

(p557) Vesta, aedicula, ara: see separate page.

Vesta, lucus: see separate page.

(pp558‑559) Vesta, aedes: see separate page.

(p560) Via Appia: see separate page.

(p561) Via Ardeatina: see separate page.

Via Asinaria: see separate page.

Via Aurelia: see separate page.

Via Campana: see separate page.

(p562) Via Collatina: see separate page.

Via Cornelia: see separate page.

(p563) Via Flaminia: see separate page.

Via Fornicata: see separate page.

Via Gabina: see separate page.

(p564) Via Labicana: see separate page.

Via Lata: see separate page.

(p565) Via Latina: see separate page.

Via Laurentina: see Via Ardeatina, Via Ostiensis.

Via Merulana: see separate page.

Via Nomentana: see separate page.

Via Nova: see Nova Via.

Via Nova: see separate page.

(p566) Via Ostiensis: see separate page.

Via Pinciana: (Eins. 12.5): see Porta Pinciana.

Via Portuensis: see separate page.

(p567) Via Praenestina: see separate page.

Via Recta: see Via Tecta (1).

Via Sacra: see Sacra Via.

(p568) Via Salaria: see separate page.

Via Tecta: see separate page.

(p569) Via Tiburtina: see separate page.

Via Triumphalis: see separate page.

Vica Pota: see separate page.

Victoria, ara: an altar in the curia Iulia (Fast. Maff. Vat. ad V Kal. Sept., CIL I2 p225, 242, 327; Herodian. VII.11.3), presumably erected by Augustus at the same time (29 B.C.) that he set up a statue of the same goddess in the same place (Cass. Dio LI.22; Suet. Aug. 100; Herodian. V.5.7). During the bitter struggle between Christianity and Paganism in the p570fourth century, this altar was regarded as the symbol of the old religion. It was removed from the senate house first by Constantius in 357, but seems to have been restored, by Julian, no doubt, and finally banished by Gratian in 382 (Sym. Rel. 3; Ambros. Ep. I.17.4; 18.1, 7, 10, 32; 57.4‑6; Seeck, Symmachus LIII‑LIV, LVIII; WR 98, 141; Jord. I.2.251‑252).

Victoria, aedes: see separate page.

Victoria Virgo, aedicula: a shrine dedicated by Cato 1st August, 193 B.C. prope aedem Victoriae (Liv. XXXV.9.6), two years after it had been vowed (Fast. cit.r.).

Vicus Aemilianus: see separate page.

Vicus Aesculeti: see separate page.

Vicus Africus: see separate page.

Vicus Apollinis: see separate page.

Vicus Armilustri: see Armilustrium.

Vicus Bellonae: see separate page.

Vicus Brutianus: see separate page.

(p571) Vicus Bublarius: see separate page.

Vicus Caesaris: see separate page.

Vicus Caeseti: see separate page.

Vicus Camenarum: see Camenae.

Vicus Canarius: see separate page.

Vicus Capitis Africae: see Caput Africae.

Vicus Capitis Canteri: see separate page.

Vicus Caprarius: see separate page.

Vicus Censori: see separate page.

(p572) Vicus Collis Viminalis: see separate page.

Vicus Columnae Ligneae: see separate page.

Vicus Compiti Pastoris: see separate page.

Vicus Cuprius: see separate page.

Vicus Curiarum: see separate page.

Vicus Curvus: see separate page.

Vicus Cyclopis: see Antrum Cyclopis.

Vicus Dianae: see separate page.

Vicus Drusianus: see separate page.

Vicus Epicteti (?): see Epictetenses.

Vicus Fabrici: see Compitum Fabricium.

Vicus Fanni: see separate page.

(p573) Vicus . . .ionum Ferrariarum: see separate page.

Vicus Fidii: see separate page.

Vicus Fortunae Dubiae: see separate page.

Vicus Fortunae Mammosae: see separate page.

Vicus Fortunae Obsequentis: see separate page.

Vicus Fortunae Respicientis: see separate page.

Vicus Fortunati: see separate page.

Vicus Frumentarius: see separate page.

Vicus Gemini: see separate page.

Vicus Honoris et Virtutis: see separate page.

Vicus Huiusce Diei: see separate page.

Vicus Ianuclensis: see separate page.

Vicus Iovis Fagutalis: see separate page.

Vicus Insteius: (Livy), Insteianus (Varro): see separate page.

(p574) Vicus Ianus: see Ianus.

(p575) Vicus Iugarius: see separate page.

Vicus Laci Fundani: see Lacus Fundanus.

Vicus Laci Miliari, Laci Restituti, Laci Tecti: see separate page.

Vicus Larum Alitum: see separate page.

Vicus Larum Curialium: see separate page.

Vicus Licinianus: see separate page.

Vicus Longi Aquilae: see Aquilenses.

Vicus Longus: see separate page.

Vicus Lorarius: see separate page.

p576 Vicus Loreti Minoris, Maioris: see Loretum.

Vicus Mamuri: see Clivus Mamuri.

Vicus Materiarius: see separate page.

Vicus Mercurii Ebrii: see separate page.

Vicus Minervi: see separate page.

Vicus Mundiciei: see separate page.

Vicus Novus: see separate page.

Vicus Pacrai. . .: see separate page.

Vicus Padi: see separate page.

Vicus Pallacinae: see Pallacina.

Vicus Panispernae: see separate page.

(p577) Vicus Patricius: see separate page.

Vicus Pauli: see separate page.

Vicus Piscinae Publicae: see Piscina Publica.

Vicus Platanonis: see Platanonis.

Vicus Ploti: see separate page.

Vicus Portae Collinae: see Alta Semita.

Vicus Portae Naeviae: see Porta Naevia.

Vicus Portae R(a)udusculanae: see Porta Raudusculana.

Vicus Pulverarius: see separate page.

Vicus Quadrati: see separate page.

Vicus Raciliani Maioris — Minoris: see separate page.

Vicus Rostratae: see separate page.

Vicus Sabuci: see separate page.

Vicus Salutaris: see separate page.

Vicus Salutis: see Clivus Salutis.

Vicus Sandaliarius: see separate page.

(p578) Vicus Saufei: see separate page.

Vicus Scauri: see Clivus Scauri.

Vicus . . .mi Publici: see separate page.

Vicus Sceleratus: see Clivus Orbius.

Vicus Sergi: see separate page.

Vicus [Sil]ani Salientis: see separate page.

Vicus Sobrius: see separate page.

Vicus Statae Matris: see separate page.

Vicus Statae Siccianae: see separate page.

Vicus Statuae Valerianae: see Statua Valeriana.

(p579) Vicus Sulpicius: see separate page.

Vicus Summi Choragii: see Summum Choragium.

[right arrow] For additional details,
see Annas Rom Guide.

Vicus Tiberini: see separate page.

Vicus Triarii: see Clivus Triarius.

Vicus Trium Ararum: see Clivus Scauri.

Vicus Trium Vi[a]rum: see separate page.

Vicus Turarius: see Vicus Tuscus.

(p580) Vicus Tuscus: see separate page.

Vicus V(aler)i (?): see separate page.

Vicus Veneris Almae: see separate page.

Vicus Vestae: see separate page.

Vicus Victoris: see separate page.

Vicus Viridiarii: see separate page.

Vicus Vitrarius: see separate page.

Vicus Unguentarius: see separate page.

Vicus . . . si . . . Luc. . .i: see separate page.

Vicus Ceios (?): see separate page.

Vigiles: see Cohortium Vigilum Stationes.

Villa Coponiana: the villa of a certain Coponius, perhaps one of the two brothers, Gaius and Titus, contemporaries of Cicero (RE IV.1215). It is mentioned once (Cic. ad Att. XII.31.2: Coponianam villam et veterem et non magnam novi, silvam nobilem, fructum autem neutrius), and may pottery have been included in the Horti Drusi (q.v.; cf. Tyrrell-Purser, Correspondence of Cicero V.40).

(p581) Villa Publica: see separate page.

(p582) Viminalis Collis: see separate page.

Virgo Caelestis: A shrine of this deity, the patron of Carthage, appears to have existed on the north summit of the Capitol on the spot afterwards occupied by the church of S. Maria in Aracoeli, which took its name from a misreading of the inscription on the mediaeval high altar (NS 1892, 43, 407; Mitt. 1893, 288; DAP 2.ii.331; Hülsen, The Legend of Aracoeli in Journ. Brit. and Am. Arch. Soc. IV (1906‑12), 39‑48; HCh 323, 324; Town Planning Review XII (1927), 162; PT 135).

Virtus, ἱερόν: a shrine built by the younger Scipio after his capture of Numantia (Plut. de fort. Rom. 5), of which nothing more is known (WR 149; Rosch. I.2708).

Virtus, signum: a statue which probably stood outside the porta Collina, as the inscription recording its dedication was found in the Via Venti Settembre when the Ministero delle Finanze was being built (CIL VI.3735 = 31061: signu]m Virtuti de ea sum(ma) rest[itutum quam . . .]ius T(h)eseus Virtuti d(ono) [dederat). This is the only dedication to Virtus that has been found in Rome. The same statue is perhaps referred to by Cass. Dio (XLVIII.43.4: καὶ Ἀρετῆς ἄγαλμα πρὸ πυλῶν τινων ἑστός), and the existence of a statue or statues probably indicates a shrine (HJ 415), in or near the temple of Honos (q.v.).

Vinea Publica: apparently a public vineyard or park, known only from the inscription on a terminal cippus of 75 A.D. (CIL VI.933; cf. 31208: Imp. Caesar Vespasianus Aug. . . . locum viniae publicae occupatum a privatis per collegium pontificum restituit). This was found outside the Aurelian wall between the 'porta Ardeatina' and the porta Appia (BC 1882, 155), and probably the vinea lay south of the Bastione del Sangallo, within the limits of Region XII, if this region ever extended beyond the line of the wall.

Vivarium: an enclosure in which wild beasts intended for use in the amphitheatre were kept (cf. Gell. II.20). It is mentioned in one inscription of 241 A.D. (CIL VI.130), and by Procopius (BG I.22, 23). Procopius states distinctly that it was close to the porta Praenestina, that its outer walls were low without towers or battlements, and that it opened directly into the city by a gate. This description indicates a rectangular enclosure, just outside the porta Praenestina, between the Aurelian wall where it coincides with the aqua Claudia and the via Labicana (HJ 365‑367, 391‑392). In the twelfth century and later the castra Praetoria was called Vivarium, and a building just south of it the Vivariolum (Vivaiolo). This fact, together with some evidence supposed to be derived from the alleged place of discovery of the inscription, has been regarded by some as proof that the Vivarium was this building south of p583the Castra (BC 1876, 188; 1877, 93; LS II.247‑249; Richter 298; LR 385), but this view can hardly be maintained against the direct testimony of Procopius.

(p584) Volcanal: see separate page.

Volcanus, aedes: see separate page.

Volupia, scaellum (ara, Fasti Praen.): a shrine near the Porta Romanula (q.v.) at the point where the Nova via entered the Velabrum (Varro, LL V.164; cf. VI.24; Macrob. I.10.7). It contained a statue of diva Angerona with her finger held to her lips (Plin. NH III.65; Solin. I.6), to whom sacrifice was offered on her festival, the Divalia or Angeronalia, on 21st December (Fast. Praen. ad XII Kal. Ian., CIL I2 p238, 337; RE I.2190; Rosch. I.350; WR 241). The exact site cannot be fixed.a

Vortumnus, aedes: see separate page.

Vortumnus, signum: see Statua Vortumni.

Thayer's Note: There is no such entry in the Dictionary.

Thayer's Note:

a See also the entry Curia Acculeia.


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