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Thomas Hodgkin:
Italy and her Invaders

Introduction

Plan of the Work. Summary of Roman Imperial History.

1

The Dynasty of Valentinian.

25

Early History of the Goths.

43

On the Early History of the Goths, as told by Jornandes.

82

Book I

The Last Years of Valens.

89

Theodosius.

129

Internal Organisation of the Empire.

200

Honorius, Stilicho, Alaric.

234

On the Name Alaric.

274

On the Division of Illyricum.

275

Alaric's First Invasion of Italy.

277

On the Chronology of Alaric's First Invasion.

310

The Fall of Stilicho.

314

Alaric's Three Sieges of Rome.

338

Statistical Aspects of the Contest between Rome and the Barbarians.

390

The Lovers of Placidia.

397

Placidia Augusta.

431

Early Ecclesiastical History of Ravenna, or Notes from the First Part of the Liber Pontificalis of Agnellus.

472

St. Augustine and Count Bonifacius.

495

Salvian on the Divine Government.

504

Book II

Early History of the Huns.

1

On the Early Identification of the Hiong‑nu with the Huns.

35

Attila and the Court of Constantinople.

37

Attila in Gaul.

99

On the site of the so‑called Battle of Châlons.

143

Attila in Italy.

146

On the Date of the Foundation of Venice.

182

Book III

Extinction of the Hunnish Empire and the Theodosian Dynasty.

189

On the Character of Petronius Maximus.

206

The Vandals from Germany to Rome.

209

Chronology of the Vandal Kings.

290

The Letters and Poems of Apollinaris Sidonius.

297

Avitus, the Client of the Visigoths.

374

On the Alleged Immoralities of Avitus.

393

Supremacy of Ricimer. Majorian.

396

Supremacy of Ricimer (continued). Severus II, the Lucanian, A.D. 461‑465. Anthemius, the Client of Byzantium, A.D. 467‑472.

430

Olybrius, the client of the Vandal, A.D. 472. Glycerius, the client of the Burgundian, A.D. 473‑474. Julius Nepos, the client of Byzantium, A.D. 474‑475. Romulus Augustulus, son of Orestes, A.D. 475‑476.

475

Vandal Dominion over the Islands of the Mediterranean

503

Odovacar, the Soldier of Fortune

506

Causes of the Fall of the Western Empire

532

Book IV

A Century of Ostrogothic History.

1

On the Route of the Ostrogothic Army and their Settlement in Macedonia.

28

The Reign of Zeno.

30

The Two Theodorics in Thrace.

72

Flavius Odovacar.

122

On Odovacar's Deed of Gift to Pierius.

150

The Rugian War.

155

Odovacar's Name in an Inscription at Salzburg

174

The Death-Grapple.

177

The 'Annals of Ravenna' on the war between Odovacar and Theodoric

214

Technical Details

Editions Used

zzz Thomas Hodgkin died in 1913: the work consequently entered the public domain on 1 Jan 1984.

Proofreading

As almost always, I retyped the text by hand rather than scanning it — not only to minimize errors prior to proofreading, but as an opportunity for me to become intimately familiar with the work, an exercise which I heartily recommend: Qui scribit, bis legit. (Well-meaning attempts to get me to scan text, if successful, would merely turn me into some kind of machine: gambit declined.)

This transcription is being minutely proofread. I run a first proofreading pass immediately after entering each chapter; then a second proofreading, detailed and meant to be final: in the table of contents above, chapters are shown on blue backgrounds, indicating that I believe them to be completely errorfree; or on red backgrounds, meaning that the chapter has not received that second final proofreading. The header bar at the top of each chapter page will remind you with the same color scheme.

The print editions were very well proofread, typographical errors occurring on average every eighty pages. These rare errors then, when I could fix them, I did, when important, with a bullet like this;º and when trivial, with a dotted underscore like this: as elsewhere on my site, glide your cursor over the bullet or the underscored words to read the variant. Similarly, bullets before measurements provide conversions to metric, e.g., 10 miles.

Inconsistencies or errors in punctuation are remarkably few; they have been corrected to the author's usual style, in slightly brighter blue — barely noticeable on the page when it's a comma for example like this one, but it shows up in the sourcecode as <SPAN CLASS="emend">. Finally, a number of odd spellings, curious turns of phrase, apparently duplicated citations, etc. have been marked <!‑‑ sic ‑‑> in the sourcecode, just to confirm that they were checked.

Any other mistakes, please drop me a line, of course: especially if you have a copy of the printed book in front of you.

Pagination and Local Links

For citation and indexing purposes, the pagination is indicated by local links in the sourcecode: so far, that's just like any other text on my site. But because I've felt it useful to transcribe the print edition's original index, I've made the pagination apparent in the right margin of the text at the page turns (like at the end of this linep57): it's hardly fair to give you "pp53‑56" as a reference and not tell you where p56 ends. Sticklers for total accuracy will of course find the anchor at its exact place in the sourcecode.

In addition, I've inserted a number of other local anchors: whatever links might be required to accommodate the author's own cross-references, as well as a few others for my own purposes. If in turn you have a website and would like to target a link to some specific passage of the text, please let me know: I'll be glad to insert a local anchor there as well.


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