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Dionysius of Halicarnassus:
Roman Antiquities


[image ALT: A stone cylinder, about 1 meter tall, carved with the heads of cattle decorated with fillets and garlands. It is a Roman altar in Bodrum (Turkey).]

A Roman altar, of about the time of Dionysius, in a courtyard in Bodrum, the ancient Halicarnassus. The historian was a religious man; for all we know he may have prayed here.

Photo © Jona Lendering 2004, by kind permission.
For further details about the town, now Bodrum in Turkey, see the Halicarnassus page at Livius.

The Text of Dionysius on LacusCurtius

The text on this website is the English translation by Earnest Cary in the Loeb Classical Library, 7 volumes, Greek texts and facing English translation: Harvard University Press, 1937 thru 1950. It is now in the public domain pursuant to the 1978 revision of the U. S. Copyright Code, since the various copyrights were not renewed at the appropriate times, which would have been in certain required years between 1964 and 1978. (Details here on the copyright law involved.)

As usual, I'm retyping the text rather than scanning it: not only to minimize errors prior to proofreading, but as an opportunity for me to become intimately familiar with the work, an exercise which I heartily recommend. (Well-meaning attempts to get me to scan text, if successful, would merely turn me into some kind of machine: gambit declined.)

The individual books of the work are too long to fit comfortably on single webpages, and I divided each one into several webpages. The divisions are at the most sensible places I could find.

The transcription will eventually be subjected to a minute proofreading, of course. In the table of contents below, however, sections that remain for now unproofed are shown on red backgrounds; proofread sections are given blue backgrounds. The header bar at the top of each webpage will remind you with the same color scheme. Should you still spot an error, please do report it, of course.

Further details on the technical aspects of the site layout follow the Table of Contents.

Book
Chapters
Main Subject

I

Preface: zzz.

The Aborigines and the early waves of Greek immigration to Italy.

Aeneas

The foundation of Romulus' city.

II

Romulus: the foundation of the Roman state and of Roman law.

Romulus' wars.

After the death of Romulus.

III

zzz.

zzz.

Ancus Marcius

zzz.

IV

zzz.

zzz.

zzz.

zzz.

V

zzz.

zzz.

zzz.

zzz.

VI

zzz.

zzz.

Brutus' speech.

Concord returns between plebeians and patricians.

VII

zzz.

The trial of Marcius Coriolanus.

zzz.

VIII

The war against Rome and her allies undertaken by Coriolanus and the Volscians.

The end of Coriolanus.

zzz.

zzz.

IX

zzz.

zzz.

zzz.

X

zzz.

zzz.

zzz.

The decemvirate.

XI

zzz.

zzz.

zzz.

XII

Fragments: zzz.

XIII

Fragments: Camillus; the Gallic invasion of Rome.

XIV

zzz.

XV

Fragments: the Samnite wars.

XVI

Fragments: zzz.

XVII‑XVIII

Fragments: on the Samnite Wars.

XIX

Fragments: the war against Pyrrhus.

XX

Fragments: zzz.

Chapter and Section Numbering, Local Links

Both chapters (large numbers) and sections (small numbers) mark local links, according to a consistent scheme; you can therefore link directly to any passage.

Notes and Apparatus

Prof. Cary's translation comes with just about the right amount of notes: explanations or cross-references, I've included them all. The Greek text is not accompanied by a full apparatus, but occasional notes mark a variant or a crux; I've reproduced only those referred to in the English notes: more would have been pointless, less would have been unfair.


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Site updated: 19 Dec 07