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T. I, Vol. 2
p1556
Craticula

Article by E. Saglio in

Daremberg & Saglio,
Dictionnaire des Antiquités Grecques et Romaines,
Librairie Hachette et Cie., Paris, 1877‑1919.

translation and © William P. Thayer

Craticula. — Diminutive of crates, used in particular to mean a gridiron,1 the bars of which give it the appearance of wickerwork. The model reproduced here (fig. 2049), found at Pompeii, is p1557of iron; it has a suspension ring: others have a handle.2 This one has parallel bars only, with no crossbars; others have crossbars as well, being seen for example in Christian monuments (fig. 2050), where a gridiron was represented as the instrument of martyrdom of St. Lawrence.3

The same term is also applied to other objects pierced with openings forming a grating; for example to the upper plate of a small stove,4 a boiler,5 etc.

[image ALT: A woodcut of zzz. It is an example of an ancient Roman gridiron, discussed in the text of this webpage.]
		
[image ALT: A woodcut of zzz. It is an example of an ancient Roman gridiron, discussed in the text of this webpage.]

Fig. 2049

Fig. 2050

Gridirons.


The Author's Notes:

1 Martial XIV.221.

2 Muratori, Insc. II, pl. CMLX, 4.

3 Lupi, Dissert. e lett. I, p192; Macarius, Hagioglypta, Paris, 1856, p28; Garrucci, Storia d. arte crist. p480, 8; Martigny, Dict. des antiq. Chrét. 2d ed., p35, 154.

4 Gloss. Isid. 141: "Arula, craticula."

5 Cato, De re rust. 13; see Schneider, ad loc. Others read here: "Lucernas craticulas duas", i.e., two lanterns with gratings.


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Page updated: 28 Oct 10