[image ALT: Much of my site will be useless to you if you've got the images turned off!]
mail:
Bill Thayer

[image ALT: Cliccare qui per una pagina di aiuto in Italiano.]
Italiano

[Link to a series of help pages]
Help
[Link to the next level up]
Up
[Link to my homepage]
Home

p331 Cyma

Article by Philip Smith, B.A., of the University of London
on p331 of

William Smith, D.C.L., LL.D.:
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, John Murray, London, 1875.

CYMA (κῦμα), in architecture, an ogee, a wave-shaped moulding, consisting of two curves, the one concave and the other convex. There were two forms, the cyma recta, which was concave above, and convex below, thus, 
[image ALT: A schematic cross-section of a column molding described in the text.]
	, and the cyma reversa, which was convex above and concave below, thus, 
[image ALT: A schematic cross-section of a column molding described in the text.]
	. The diminutive cymatium or cumatium (κυμάτιον) is also used, and is indeed the more common name. The original form of the cymatium, was, however, a simple hollow (the cavetto) thus 
[image ALT: A schematic cross-section of a column molding described in the text.]
	. This was called the cymatium Doricum, and the other the cymatium Lesbicum. (Aesch. Fr. 70, ed. Dindorf; Böckh. Corp. Inscr. vol. I p284; Vitruv. III s. 5 § 7,º Schn. IV.6 § 2‑6; Gruter, Inscr. Gr. und Röm. Bauord. pp6, 7; for examples, see the profiles on p326.)


[image ALT: Valid HTML 4.01.]

Page updated: 25 Mar 10