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The entries on pp996‑1090 of

William Smith, D.C.L., LL.D.:
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, John Murray, London, 1875.

 

Thayer's Note: I'm not particularly interested in ancient Greece. My site therefore includes, with few exceptions, only those entries that pertain to Rome. In these index pages, those that pertain exclusively to Greece are indicated in grey; I do not plan to put them onsite, although here and there I may change my mind.

Entries in italics are not in Smith's Dictionary at all, but could or should have been, and a resource is onsite which there is no point in omitting.

SACCUS (σάκκος) signified in general any kind of sack or bag, made of hair, cloth, or other materials. We have only to notice here its meaning as — 1. A head-dress [Coma, p329.] 2. A sieve for straining wine [Vinum]. 3. A purse for holding money. Hence the phrase in Plautus ire ad saccum, "to go a begging" (Plaut. Capt. I.1.22).

Sacellum: see separate page.

SACERDOS, SACERDO′TIUM: see separate page.

Sacra: see separate page.

Sacramentum: [Jusjurandum; Vindiciae.]

Sacrarium: see separate page.

Sacrificium: see separate page.

Sacrilegium: see separate page.

Sacrorum detestatio: [Gens, p568B.]

Saeculares ludi: [Ludi Saeculares.]

Saeculum: see separate page.

SAGA′RII, the sellers or makers of the saga or soldiers' cloaks [Sagum.] They formed a collegium at Rome, and, like many of the other trade-corporations, worshipped the imperial family, as we see from inscriptions (Dig. 14 tit. 4 s5 § 15; 17 tit. 2 s52 § 4; and the inscription in A. W. Zumpt, De Augustalibus, Berol. 1846, p17).

Sagitta: see separate page.

Sagmina: see separate page.

Sagum: see separate page.

Salaminia

Salarium: see separate page.

Salii: see separate page.

Salinae: see separate page.

Salinum: see separate page.

Saltatio: see separate page.

Salvia′num interdictum: [Interdictum.]

SALUTATO′RES, the name given in the later times of the republic and under the empire to a class of men who obtained their living by visiting the houses of the wealthy early in the morning to pay their respects to them (salutare, and to accompany them when they wen abroad. This arrow from the visits which the clients were accustomed to pay to their patrons, and degenerated in later times into the above-mentioned practice. Such persons seem to have obtained a good living among the great number of wealthy and vain persons at  p1107 Rome, who were gratify 00ied by this attention. (Mercenarius Salutator, Colum. Praef. I; Martial, X.74; Becker, Gallus, vol. I p146). [Sportula].

Sambuca: see separate page.

Samni′tes: [Gladiatores, p576A.]

Sandalium: see separate page.

SANDAPILA [Funus, p559A.]

SARCO′PHAGUS [Funus, p559B.]

SA′RCULUM, (a sarriendo, Varro, de L. Lat. V.31, σκαλίς, σκαλιστήριον), a hoe, chiefly used in weeding gardens, cornfields, and vineyards ( Hor. Carm. I.1.11; Ovid, Met. XI.36, Fast. I.699, IV.930; Plaut. Truc. II.2.21; Cato, de Re Rust. 10; Columella, X.21; Pallad. I.43). It was also sometimes used to cover the seed when sown (Columella, II.11), and in mountainous countries it served instead of a plough (Plin. H. N. XVIII.19 s49). Directions for using it to clear the surface of the ground (σκάλλειν, Herod. II.14; σκαλεύειν, Schol. in Theocrit. X.14) are given by Palladius (de Re Rust. II.9).

Sarissa

Sarra′cum: see separate page.

SARTA′GO (τήγανον), was a sort of pan which was used in the Roman kitchens for a variety of purposes, such as roasting, melting fat or butter, cooking, &c. ( Plin. H. N. XVI.22; Juv. X.63). Frequently also dishes consisting of a variety of ingredients seem to have been prepared in such a sartago, as Persius (I.79) speaks of a sartago loquendi, that is, of a mixture of proper and im proper expressions. Some commentators on this passage, and perhaps with more justice, understand the sartago loquendi as a mode of speaking in which hissing sounds are employed, similar to the noise produced when meat is fried in a pan.

Satisda′tio: [Actio.]

Sa′tura: see separate page.

Saturna′lia: see separate page.

Scalae: see separate page.

Scalptu′ra: see separate page.

Scalptura′tum: [Domus, p431A.]

Scamnum: see separate page.

Scapha: [Navis, p786A.]

Scaphepho′ria. [Hydriaphoria]

Scena: [Theatrum]

Sceptrum: see separate page.

SCHOENUS (ὁ, ἡ, σχοῖνος), literally, a rope of rushes, an Egyptian and Persian itinerary and land measure (Herod. I.66). Its length is stated by Herodotus (II.69) at 60 stadia, or 2 parasangs; by Eratosthenes at 40 stadia, and by others at 32 or 30 (Plin. H. N. V.9 s. 10, XII.14 s. 30). Strabo and Pliny both state that the schoenus varied in different parts of Egypt and Persia (Strabo, p803; Plin. H. N. VI.26 s.30; comp. Athen. III p122a.

Schola: [Balneae, p189B.]

 p1012  Sciadepho′ria. [Hydriaphoria]

Sciothericum: [Horologium]

SCI′PIO [Sceptrum]

Sciri′tae: [Exercitus, p485B.]

SCOR′PIO [Tormentum]

Scribae: see separate page.

Scy′ria Dike

Scytale: see separate page.

Scythae (Σκύθαι). [Demosii]

Secespita: see separate page.

SECRETA′RIUM [Auditorium]

Sectio: see separate page.

SECTOR [Sectio]

Securis: see separate page.

SECUTO′RES [Gladiatores, p576A]

Seisachtheia

SELIQUASTRUM [Sella, No. IV]

Sella: see separate page.

Senatus: see separate page.

Senatusconsultum: see separate page.

Septimontium: see separate page.

Sericum: see separate page.

Serra: see separate page.

Serta: see separate page.

Servitutes: see separate page.

Servus: see separate page.

Sestertius: see separate page.

Sextarius: see separate page.

SIBYLLINI LIBRI: see separate page.

Sica: see separate page.

SIGNA MILITARIA: see separate page.

Siparium: see separate page.

Sistrum: see separate page.

Situla: see separate page.

Soccus: see separate page.

Societas: see separate page.

Socii: see separate page.

Solea: see separate page.

Sortes: see separate page.

Speculum: see separate page.

Spira: see separate page.

Spolia: see separate page.

Sportula: see separate page.

STATOR, a public servant, who attended on the Roman magistrates in the provinces. The Statores seem to have derived their name from standing by the side of the magistrate, and thus being at hand to execute all his commands; they appear to have been chiefly employed in charge letters and messages (Cic. ad Fam. II.18, 19, X.21; Dig. 4 tit. 6 s. 10). Alexander Severus forbade the use of statores in the provinces, and commanded that their duties should be discharged by soldiers (Dig. 4 tit. 6 s. 10; Lamprid. Alex. Sev. 52).

STATUARIA ARS: see separate page.

Sthenia: see separate page.

Stilus: see separate page.

Stipendiarii: see separate page.

Stipendium: see separate page.

Stola: see separate page.

Strategus

Stratores: see separate page.

Strophium: see separate page.

Subligaculum: see separate page.

Successio: see separate page.

Suffragium: see separate page.

Suggestus: see separate page.

SUMTUARIAE LEGES: see separate page.

Superficies: see separate page.

Supplicatio: see separate page.

Sycophantes • Sylae • Syllogeis

Symbolaeon • Symbolon, Dikae apo • Symbuli • Symmoria

SYMPOSIUM: see separate page.

Synallagma • Syndicus • Synedri • Synegoricon • Synegorus • Syngeneia • Syngraphe

Synoikia: see separate page.

Synoikia (2) • Syntagma • Syntaxeis • Synteleia • Synthece

Synthesis: see separate page.

Syrinx: see separate page.

Syssitia

Systy′los: [Templum]

Page updated: 4 Nov 18