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Bill Thayer

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Class V "E"
Liceo Classico "J. Stellini"
of Udine (Italy)


[image ALT: A photograph of 21 teenagers sitting on an indoors staircase with nice wrought-iron railing; with them are standing two young adult women. It is a group portrait of a class of Italian students who translated into Italian some articles from Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities on this site.]

Udine is a small city in northeastern Italy, halfway between Venice and Trieste, with fewer than 100,000 inhabitants. If you'd like to learn more about our city and our school, we invite you to look at our website.

A Liceo Classico is a high-school with a concentration in classics. It is divided into a Ginnasio or Gymnasium (the first two years) and the Liceo or Lycaeum proper (the last three years). The grade numbering is one of those European quirks: 4th grade and 5th grade come first; then, in order, 1st grade, 2nd, and 3rd.

When we translated the Smith's Dictionary articles into our native Italian, we were all about 16 years old and were winding up our Ginnasio years. We'd already studied a lot of Latin and Greek, and could translate certain authors, as for example Caesar, Sallust, Xenophon or Lysias.

We've also learned a fair amount about ancient food and cooking; in 2001, to celebrate the end of the school year, we prepared a feast based on ancient Roman specialties, using recipes from Cato, Varro, Apicius, and Columella.

We translated into Italian the following articles of Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, on this website:

Apotheosis
Calceus
Carnifex
Crux
Fascia
Fritillus
Funambulus
Furca
Libertus
Praecones
Praefectus Praetorio
Salinae
Sandalium
Scribae
Tribunal

[image ALT: A photograph of 18 teenagers standing in a tight group, with 5 more seated in front of them. It is a group portrait of a class of Italian students who translated into Italian some articles from Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities on this site.]


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Page updated: 15 May 14