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THE

HISTORY

OF

Pompey the Little:

OR, THE

Life and Adventures

OF A

LAP-DOG.

BY

Francis Coventry


Portrait of Pompey the Little, a Lap-Dog

The portrait of Pompey the Little

There's also a GIF of the title page, for the fussy or curious among you
The page numbers below (and commented in the HTML source) refer to the third (1752) edition, which is what I have in front of me. The text is that of the 1752 edition. Typos are corrected when they would affect the reading; they are noted in the HTML.


CONTENTS.


Dedication and Contents


BOOK. I.


CHAP. I.

A Panegyric upon dogs, together with some observations on modern novels and romances

Page 1

CHAP. II.

The birth, parentage, education, and travels of a lap-dog.

p. 10

CHAP. III.

Our hero arrives in England. A conversation between two ladies concerning his master.

p. 19

CHAP. IV

.

Another conversation between Hillario and two ladies of quality.

Page 27

CHAP. V.

The characer of lady Tempest, with some particulars of her servants and Family.

p. 36

CHAP. VI.

Our hero becomes a dog of the town, and shines in high-life.

p. 48

CHAP. VII.

Relating a curious dispute on the immortality of the soul, in which the name of our hero will but once be mentioned.

p. 54

CHAP. VIII.

Various and sundry manners.

p. 66

CHAP. IX.

What the reader will know if he reads it.

Pag. 72

CHAP. X.

A matrimonial dispute.

p. 83

CHAP. XI.

A stroke at the methodists.

p. 91

CHAP. XII.

The history of a modish marriage ; the description of a coffee-house, and a very grave political debate on the good of the nation.

p. 100

CHAP. XIII.

A description of counsellor Tanturian.

p. 112

CHAP. XIV.

A short chapter, containing all the wit, and all the spirit, and all the pleasure of modern young gentlemen.

p. 117

CHAP. XV.

Our hero falls into great misfortunes.

Page. 123

CHAP. XVI.

The history of a highwayman.

p. 134

CHAP. XVII.

Adventures at the Bath.

p. 147

CHAP. XVIII.

More adventures at Bath.

p. 154


BOOK. II.


CHAP. I.

Fortune grows favourable to our hero, and restores him to high-life.

Page 165

CHAP. II.

A long chapter of characters.

p. 173

CHAP. III.

The characters of the foregoing chapter exemplified. An irreparable misfortune befals our hero.

p. 184

CHAP. IV.

Another long chapter of characters.

p. 197

CHAP. V.

A description of a drum.

Pag. 213

CHAP. VI.

In which several things are touched upon.

p. 222

CHAP. VII.

Matrimonial amusements.

p. 229

CHAP. VIII.

Describing the miseries of a garreteer poet.

p. 235

CHAP. IX.

A poetical feast, and squabble of authors.

p. 244

CHAP. X.

Our hero goes to the university of Cambridge.

p. 253

CHAP. XI.

Adventures at Cambridge.

Page 262

CHAP. XII.

The character of a master of arts at a university.

p. 267

CHAP. XIII.

Pompey returns to London, and occasions a remarkable dispute in the Mall.

p. 273

CHAP. XIV.

A terrible misfortune happens to our hero, which brings his history to a conclusion.

p. 279

CHAP. XV.

The CONCLUSION.

p. 287


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