Henry Peacham (1638) The Valley of Varietie, Contents, unnumbered pages vii-xi


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The Contents of the
CHAPTERS.

Chap. I.

What to thinke of the which [sic] length of Age, Men lived in former times, and shortly after the Creation.
Fol. 1

Chap. II.

Of the Dead Sea.
9

Chap. III.

Of that admirable Alteration or Change, which is every five hundred yeares, as well in the Church, as in everie Common-wealth: As also of the contrary Fortunes of certain Kingdomes under Princes of the same Name.
18

Chap. IV.

Of those Locusts, which the Scripture saith John Baptist did eate: where beside, many admirable things are reported of strange and unaccustomed meats.
26

Chap. V.

Of many who having received Poyson, have not onely miraculously escaped, but beene thereby cured of (else) incurable Diseases.
37

Chap. VI.

Of that fire which perpetually burneth in ancient Monuments.
49

Chap. VII.

Of the strange mixture of Vertue and Vice, in the Natures and Dispositions of manie men.
54

Chap. VIII.

The Vanitie of some mens Ambition, in Titles and Honours.
65

Chap. IX.

Of the ancient Triumphs among the Romanes.
74

Chap. X.

The extreme Madnesse, and vaine Pride of some great Persons in former Ages.
86

Chap. XI.

Of Cinnamome.
97

Chap. XII.

Of Balsamum.
101

Chap. XIII.

What Studies and Exercises best become Princes.
107

Chap. XIV.

Of incombustible Flaxe, or which will not consume by Fire.
129

Chap. XV.

Of an artificiall kinde of guilding amongst the Romanes, which they called Pyropus, as also of Electrum.
133

Chap. XVI.

Of Margaret the Wife of Herman, Earle of Henneberge.
140

Chap. XVII.

Of Glasse made Malleable, to be beaten forth every way.
144

Chap. XVIII.

Of Bells.
151

Chap. XIX.

The occasion of the alteration of the Armes of Bohemia.
158

Chap. XX.

A most ancient and pleasant manner of Choosing their Prince in Carinthia.
162

Chap. XXI.

The marveilous simplicitie of a Monke, fetched out of his Monasterie, to be crowned a King.
168

Chap. XXII.

A wittie, but a ridiculous reply, and vindication of a disgrace.
172


This page is by James Eason.