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Bill Thayer

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This webpage reproduces the reading list
at the end of

Sail On

by
Allan Nevins

published by
United States Lines
1946

The text is in the public domain.

This page has been carefully proofread
and I believe it to be free of errors.
If you find a mistake though,
please let me know!

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This site is not affiliated with the US Merchant Marine Academy.

 p103  A Shelf of Nautical Books

R. G. Albion, The Rise of New York Port, 1815‑1860 (1937)

A detailed and authoritative book explaining how New York rose to be the foremost seaport of the United States.

Robert E. Anderson, The Merchant Marine and World Frontiers (1945)

A valuable account of the development of the merchant marine since the passage of the Act of 1936, written by the Director of Finance of the United States Maritime Commission.

A. H. Clark, The Clipper Ship Era (1910)

The first really good study of the clipper ships, written with accuracy and verve.

C. C. Cutler, Greyhounds of the Sea: The Story of the American Clipper Ships (1930)

Also thorough and readable; full of detailed statistical data on the ships.

Fred E. Dayton, Steamboat Days (1925).

Especially good on the construction of New England and Sound steamboats.

W. L. Marvin, The American Merchant Marine: Its History and Romance from 1620 to 1902 (1902)

A standard work, chronological in arrangement, written from the sources, and interesting in style, but markedly anti-foreign in tone.

Samuel Eliot Morison, Maritime History of Massachusetts, 1783‑1860 (1921)

Delightfully written, and particularly illuminating on the Oriental trade.

J. H. Morrison, History of American Steam Navigation (1903)

Comprehensive, and valuable for reference, but not very interesting.


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Page updated: 19 Dec 21