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This webpage reproduces one of the
Lives of the Eminent Philosophers

by
Diogenes Laërtius

published in the Loeb Classical Library, 1925

The text is in the public domain.

This page has been carefully proofread
and I believe it to be free of errors.
If you find a mistake though,
please let me know!

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Dionysius

(Vol. II) Diogenes Laërtius
Lives of the Eminent Philosophers

Book VII

 p269  Chapter 3
Herillus (flor. c. 260 B.C.)

[link to original Greek text] 165 Herillus of Carthage declared the end of action to be Knowledge, that is, so to live always as to make the scientific life the standard in all things and not to be misled by ignorance. Knowledge he defined as a habit of mind, not to be upset by argument, in the acceptance of presentations. Sometimes he used to say there was no single end of action, but it shifted according to varying circumstances and objects, as the same bronze might become a statue either of Alexander or of Socrates. He made a distinction between end-in‑chief and subordinate end: even the unwise may aim at the latter, but only the wise seek the true end of life. Everything that lies between virtue and vice have pronounced indifferent. His writings, though they do not occupy much space, are full of vigour and contain some controversial passages in reply to Zeno.

[link to original Greek text] 166 He is said to have had many admirers when a boy; and as Zeno wished to drive them away, he compelled Herillus to have his head shaved, which disgusted them.

His books are the following:

p271 Of Training.

Of the Passions.

Concerning Opinion or Belief.

The Legislator.

The Obstetrician.

The Challenger.

The Teacher.

The Reviser.

The Controller.

Hermes.

Medea.

Dialogues.

Ethical Themes.


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Page updated: 15 Feb 18